Tiia Luostarinen

Tiia Luostarinen
University of Helsinki | HY · Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme / Environmental Change research Unit (ECRU)

Master of Science

About

1
Publication
129
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8
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
8 Citations
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Introduction
I am a doctoral student focusing on Arctic sea-ice proxy development. I am using both biological and geochemical methods, as well as single cell PCR analysis to improve the knowledge we have on the species commonly associated with ice.
Education
September 2014 - December 2017
University of Helsinki
Field of study
  • Environmental geology and geochemistry

Publications

Publication (1)
Article
We recorded diatom species succession over one full year (May 2017–May 2018) using automated sediment traps installed in two contrasting Greenlandic fjords: the seasonally ice-covered Young Sound in high-arctic Northeast Greenland and the nearly sea-ice free Godthåbsfjord in subarctic Southwest Greenland. The traps were positioned at differing wate...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Sea-ice decline is one of the most striking consequences of recent climate-driven changes in the Arctic. The short observational time series and current climate models are inadequate in explaining the natural variation and foreseeing responses of arctic marine ecosystems, highlighting the urgent need to exploit natural archives (proxies). Protists abundantly stored in the seafloor of the Arctic Ocean are widely applied proxies for past sea-ice reconstruction, notwithstanding that little is known of their relationships to the ice ecosystem. This project will investigate seasonal processes that result in the formation of proxy archives and apply this knowledge in ecosystem modelling and reconstruction of pre-anthropogenic sea-ice conditions. The results will improve our understanding of the seasonal behaviour of arctic marine ecosystems in the long term.