Tiff-Annie Kenny

Tiff-Annie Kenny
Laval University | ULAVAL

About

30
Publications
11,584
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1,005
Citations
Citations since 2017
30 Research Items
1004 Citations
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Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Background Academic research on food security in Inuit Nunangat and Alaska frequently adopts the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations' working definition of food security and Western conceptualisations of what it means to be ‘food secure’. However, in 2014, the Alaskan branch of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) stated that aca...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Country (traditional) foods are integral to Inuit culture, but market food consumption is increasing. The Qanuilirpitaa? 2017 Nunavik Health Survey (Q2017) reported similar country food consumption frequency compared to that in 2004; however, examining food items individually does not account for diet patterns, food accessibility, and co...
Article
Understanding mechanisms that promote social-ecological resilience can inform future adaptation strategies. Among seafood dependent communities, these can be illuminated by assessing change among fisheries portfolios. Here, in collaboration with a Coast Salish Nation in British Columbia, Canada, we used expert Indigenous knowledge and network analy...
Article
Full-text available
Calls to address social equity in ocean governance are expanding. Yet ‘equity’ is seldom clearly defined. Here we present a framework to support contextually-informed assessment of equity in ocean governance. Guiding questions include: (1) Where and (2) Why is equity being examined? (3) Equity for or amongst Whom? (4) What is being distributed? (5)...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is disproportionally impacting the Circumpolar North, with particular impacts among Indigenous populations. Environmental changes are felt in many aspects of daily life of Northern communities, including both physical and mental health. Thus, health institutions from around the Arctic must meet emerging needs, while the phenomenon re...
Technical Report
Full-text available
12th Edition of Canada's Food Price Report which predicts food prices for 2022
Article
A multi-stage sampling strategy selected 1387 on-reserve First Nations adults in Ontario. Foods from a 24-hour dietary recall were assigned to the 100 most common food groups for men and women. Nutrients from market foods (MF) and traditional foods (TF) harvested from the wild as well as MF costs were assigned based on the proportions of total gram...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean conditions can affect human health in a variety of ways that are often overlooked and unappreciated. Oceans adjacent to Canada are affected by many anthropogenic stressors, with implications for human health and well-being. Climate change further escalates these pressures and can expose coastal populations to unique health hazards and distres...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples in high-income countries experience higher burdens of food insecurity, obesity, and diet-related health conditions compared to national averages. The objective of this systematic scoping review is to synthesize information from the published literature on the methods/approaches, findings, and scope for research and interventions...
Article
Objective: The current study undertook a systematic scoping review on the drivers and implications of dietary changes among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. Design: A keyword search of peer-reviewed articles was performed using PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database and High North Research...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the feasibility of linear programming (LP) to develop diets that were economical, included traditional (cultural, non-market) foods and met the dietary reference intakes (DRI) in a Canadian Indigenous population. Diet optimisation using LP is a mathematical technique that can develop food-based dietary guidelines for healthy eating in I...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) is the top dietary source of iron and several micronutrients necessary for red blood cell production (erythropoiesis) in the contemporary diet of Inuit adults across Canada. Many caribou populations across the circumpolar north, however, have experienced dramatic declines in recent decades. Restricted access...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Traditional food systems are under pressure from various stressors, including climate change which is projected to negatively alter the abundance of marine species harvested by coastal First Nations (FNs) in British Columbia (BC). Objective: To model the potential impacts of the climate-related declines in seafood production on the n...
Data
Nutrient content of top 20 most consumed seafood species (Canadian Nutrient File, Health Canada, 2015). *—μg RAE, retinol activity equivalent, “–mg NE, niacin equivalent. (DOCX)
Data
Projected changes in nutrient intakes after substitution by potential alternative foods (chicken, canned tuna, and bread)1. 1—Average daily intake of nutrients, estimated base on gram-to-gram replacement by alternative foods. 2 –Baseline nutrient intakes from seafood based on the food frequency questionnaire of the FNFNES. 3 –Chicken: nutrient cont...
Chapter
Full-text available
This Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere1 in a Changing Climate (SROCC) was prepared following an IPCC Panel decision in 2016 to prepare three Special Reports during the Sixth Assessment Cycle2 . By assessing new scientific literature3 , the SROCC4 responds to government and observer organization proposals. The SROCC follows the other two Sp...
Article
Full-text available
This review summarizes aspects of the 2017 Canadian Nutrition Society symposium, "Modelling diets for quality and cost: examples from Inuit and First Nations in Canada". Indigenous peoples in Canada experience a high prevalence of nutrition-related chronic disease because of the poor quality and high cost of their food supply. Since European coloni...
Article
Background: It is generally believed that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is rare in the Inuit population because of their traditional marine-based diet, but the evidence is inconsistent. Objective: To describe the cardiovascular health profile of Canadian Inuit, including disease prevalence, risk factors, country food consumption, and contaminant...
Article
Indigenous Peoples living in rural and remote regions of Canada, the United States, and Australia experience the highest food prices in each country. High food prices, low incomes, and limited access to nutritious perishable foods foster increased reliance on poor quality non-perishable foods. In northern Canada, Inuit experience food insecurity at...
Article
Full-text available
Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) has been fundamental to the diet and culture of Arctic Indigenous Peoples for thousands of years. Although caribou populations observe natural cycles of abundance and scarcity, several caribou herds across the Circumpolar North have experienced dramatic declines in recent decades due to a range of interrelated factors. B...
Article
Full-text available
Food insecurity among Indigenous Peoples of northern Canada is a significant public health issue that is exacerbated by changing social and environmental conditions. While a patchwork of programs, strategies and polices exist, the extent to which they address all “pillars” of food security (food availability, access, quality, and utilization) remai...
Article
Background: Inuit have experienced a rapid transition in diet and lifestyle over the past several decades, paralleled by the emergence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Objective: To identify contemporary dietary patterns among Inuit and investigate their association with cardiovascular disease outcomes. Design:...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To characterize the major components of the contemporary Inuit diet and identify the primary sources of energy and essential nutrients. Design Dietary data were derived from the 24 h recall collected by the Inuit Health Survey (IHS) from 2007 to 2008. The population proportion method was used to determine the percentage contribution of e...
Article
Full-text available
A Traditional Food Program was developed at East Three Schools (Inuvik, Northwest Territories) in the western Canadian Arctic as part of a research collaboration with school staff and local Indigenous organizations focused on building evidenced-based strategies to promote food security in the region. The program promoted youth engagement with tradi...
Article
Full-text available
Achieving the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) results in many ecological, social, and economic consequences that are inter-related. Understanding relationships between sustainability goals and determining their interactions can help prioritize effective and efficient policy options. This paper presents a framework that integ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Achieving ocean sustainability is paramount for coastal communi es and marine industries, yet is also inextricably linked to much broader global sustainable development—including increased resilience to climate change and improved social equity—as envisioned by the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the co-bene ts fr...
Article
Full-text available
The harvest and consumption of wildlife are integral to the livelihood, culture, and nutritional status of the Inuit of northern Canada. When wildlife populations are perceived to be vulnerable, harvest restrictions may be enacted to protect species conservation interests. Such restrictions may also have consequences for the nutrition and food secu...

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Project (1)
Project
http://www.nereusprogram.org/ Who we are: The Nereus Program is a global interdisciplinary initiative created to further our knowledge of how best to attain sustainability for the world’s oceans. The Nereus Program, a collaboration between the Nippon Foundation and the University of British Columbia, has engaged in innovative, interdisciplinary ocean research since its inception in 2011. The Program is currently a global partnership of six leading marine science institutes with the aim of undertaking research that advances our comprehensive understandings of the global ocean systems across the natural and social sciences, from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. What we do: The Program is built around three core objectives: Research: conducting collaborative ocean research across the natural and social sciences Capacity building: developing a network of experts that can engage in discussion of complex and multifaceted questions of ocean sustainability Public outreach: transferring these ideas to practical solutions in global policy forums and public engagement Mission Statement: The Nereus Program strives to explore a broad range of perspectives and scientific opinions on ocean sustainability, and to create an inclusive community of researchers and other marine professionals. This principle is founded on the Nippon Foundation’s vision of global capacity building to ensure that our oceans’ legacy is preserved and potential is protected for future generations.