Tie-Yuan Zhang

Tie-Yuan Zhang
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University · Psychiatry

MD., PhD.

About

41
Publications
5,534
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3,272
Citations
Introduction
next generation sequencing
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - December 2012
McGill University
January 1998 - present
Yonsei University college of medicine
Position
  • Yonsei University

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
The multifactorial etiology of stress-related disorders necessitates a constant interrogation of the molecular convergences in preclinical models of stress that use disparate paradigms as stressors spanning from environmental challenges to genetic predisposition to hormonal signaling. Using RNA-sequencing, we investigated the genomic signatures in...
Article
Childhood abuse significantly increases the lifetime risk of negative mental health outcomes. The oxytocinergic system, which plays a role in complex social and emotional behaviors, has been shown to be sensitive to early-life experiences. While previous studies have investigated the relationship between early-life adversity and oxytocin, they did...
Preprint
Full-text available
The multifactorial etiology of stress-related disorders is a challenge in developing synchronized medical standards for treatment and diagnosis. It is largely unknown whether there exists molecular convergence in preclinical models of stress generated using disparate construct validity. Using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), we investigated the genomic si...
Article
Full-text available
BDNF-oxytocin interactions in the brain are implicated in mammalian maternal behavior. We found that BDNF gene expression is increased in the hippocampus of rat mothers that show increased pup licking/grooming (high LG mothers) compared to low LG mothers. High LG mothers also showed increased BDNF protein levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAcc). Imm...
Preprint
Full-text available
Exposure of mice to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) produces depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and widespread transcriptomic changes in several brain regions in susceptible animals. Here we present the first study of genome-wide cytosine methylation patterns of mice susceptible to CSDS using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on DNA from th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human MRI studies show that experience can lead to changes in the volume of task-specific brain regions; however, the behavioural and molecular processes driving these changes remain poorly understood. Here, we used in-vivo mouse MRI and RNA sequencing to investigate the neuroanatomical and transcriptional changes induced by environmental enrichmen...
Article
Full-text available
Most people exposed to stress do not develop depression. Animal models have shown that stress resilience is an active state that requires broad transcriptional adaptations, but how this homeostatic process is regulated remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyze upstream regulators of genes differentially expressed after chronic social def...
Article
Full-text available
Early life experience influences stress reactivity and mental health through effects on cognitive-emotional functions that are, in part, linked to gene expression in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is a major site for experience-dependent plasticity associated with sustained transcriptional alterations, potent...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Child abuse has devastating and long-lasting consequences, considerably increasing the lifetime risk of negative mental health outcomes such as depression and suicide. Yet the neurobiological processes underlying this heightened vulnerability remain poorly understood. The authors investigated the hypothesis that epigenetic, transcriptom...
Article
Early life adversity increases the risk for later infection. The febrile response is a potent mechanism to combat infection. We found that variations in maternal care influence the febrile response to 50 µg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in adult male rats. Offspring from low-licking/grooming (LG) mothers had an increased febrile response co...
Chapter
Parental care influences development across mammals. In humans, such influences include effects on phenotypes, such as stress reactivity, that determine individual differences in the vulnerability for affective disorders. Thus, variations in maternal care regulate hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression resulting in stable individual differe...
Article
Variations in maternal care in the rat affect hippocampal morphology and function as well as performance on hippocampal-dependent tests of learning and memory in the offspring. Preliminary genome-wide analyses of gene transcription and DNA methylation of the molecular basis for such maternal effects suggested differences in the epigenetic state and...
Article
Parental care influences development across mammals. In humans such influences include effects on phenotypes, such as stress reactivity, which determine individual differences in the vulnerability for affective disorders. Thus, the adult offspring of rat mothers that show an increased frequency of pup licking/grooming (ie, high LG mothers) show inc...
Chapter
There are numerous examples in the behavioral sciences of the enduring effects of early experience on neural and immune function. In this article we review the emerging evidence for epigenetics as a candidate mechanism for these effects. Epigenetics refers to functionally relevant modifications to the genome that do not involve a change in nucleoti...
Article
Maternal care in mammals is the prevailing environmental influence during perinatal development. The adult rat offspring of mothers exhibiting increased levels of pup licking/grooming (LG; High LG mothers), compared to those reared by Low LG dams, show increased hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression, complex dendritic tree structure, and a...
Article
Full-text available
Parental effects are a major source of phenotypic plasticity. Moreover, there is evidence from studies with a wide range of species that the relevant parental signals are influenced by the quality of the parental environment. The link between the quality of the environment and the nature of the parental signal is consistent with the idea that paren...
Article
Full-text available
Parenting and the early environment influence the risk for various psychopathologies. Studies in the rat suggest that variations in maternal care stably influence DNA methylation, gene expression, and neural function in the offspring. Maternal care affects neural development, including the GABAergic system, the function of which is linked to the pa...
Article
Variations in maternal behavior among lactating rats associate with differences in estrogen-oxytocin interactions in the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAcc). Thus, stable, individual differences in pup licking/grooming (LG) are abolished by oxytocin receptor blockade or treatments that eliminate differ...
Article
There are numerous examples in psychology and other disciplines of the enduring effects of early experience on neural function. In this article, we review the emerging evidence for epigenetics as a candidate mechanism for these effects. Epigenetics refers to functionally relevant modifications to the genome that do not involve a change in nucleotid...
Article
Full-text available
Dextromethorphan (DM), an over-the-counter cough suppressant, has been recently used as a drug of abuse by teenage groups in some countries, such as the United States, Canada, and Korea. We previously showed that repeated administration of DM, a noncompetitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, impairs spatial learning performance...
Article
There are profound maternal effects on individual differences in defensive responses and reproductive strategies in species ranging literally from plants to insects to birds. Maternal effects commonly reflect the quality of the environment and are most likely mediated by the quality of the maternal provision (egg, propagule, etc.), which in turn de...
Article
Familial transmission of mental illness is common. Recent studies in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychiatry reveal the importance of epigenetic mechanisms of transmission that center on the developmental consequences of variations in parental care. Studies with rats suggest that environmental adversity results in patterns of parent-offsp...
Article
Full-text available
In rats, naturally occurring variations in maternal care contribute to the development of individual differences in the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress during adulthood. The dopamine (DA) projection to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays an important role in mediating stress responsivity and is thought to be involved also in...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes the results of a series of studies showing that variations in mother-pup interactions program the development of individual differences in behavioral and endocrine stress responses in the rat. These effects are associated with altered expression of genes in brain regions, such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, tha...
Article
Maternal care in the rat influences the development of cognitive function in the offspring through neural systems known to mediate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. The offspring of mothers that exhibit increased levels of pup licking/grooming (high-LG mothers) show increased hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subunit mRNA expression, en...
Article
Full-text available
Lactating rats exhibit stable individual differences in pup licking/grooming. We used in vivo voltammetry to monitor changes in extracellular dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (n. Acc) shell of lactating rats interacting with pups and found that (1) the DA signal increased significantly with pup licking/grooming; (2) the onset of such increase...
Article
While many experiment with drugs, relatively few individuals develop a true addiction. We hypothesized that, in rats, such individual differences in the actions of addictive drugs might be determined by postnatal rearing conditions. To test this idea, we investigated whether stimulant- and stress-induced activation of nucleus accumbens dopamine tra...
Article
The role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor activity in prenatal ischemia was studied, by injecting 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT; 50μg/kg, s.c.), a 5-HT1A agonist on gestation day 17, and 30 min later inducing transient ischemia by ligating the uterine vessels for 30 min. On postnatal day 95, rats that had experienced prenatal...
Article
Dextromethorphan, an antitussive widely available over-the-counter, is abused, mostly by teenagers at high doses. In our previous report, a high dose of dextromethorphan activated the midbrain dopamine neurons of adolescent rats. In the present study, we performed c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the dopaminergic terminal regions of adolescent rat bra...
Article
Dextromethorphan (DM), an antitussive widely available in over-the-counter, has been abused mostly in teenage groups at high doses. To examine effects of DM on the reward pathway, we injected a high dose of DM (40 mg/kg; intraperitoneally) into the adolescent rat and measured tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA by in situ hybridization in the ventral te...