Tianjia Liu

Tianjia Liu
Harvard University | Harvard · Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Master of Science

About

22
Publications
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Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
In September–October 2015, El Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions set the stage for massive fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), leading to persistently hazardous levels of smoke pollution across much of Equatorial Asia. Here we quantify the emission sources and health impacts of this haze episode and compare the source...
Article
Full-text available
A rising source of outdoor emissions in northwestern India is crop residue burning, occurring after the monsoon (kharif) and winter (rabi) crop harvests. In particular, post-monsoon rice residue burning, which occurs annually from October to November and is linked to increasing mechanization, coincides with meteorological conditions that enhance sh...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Emissions of particulate matter from fires associated with land management practices in Indonesia contribute to regional air pollution and mortality. We assess the public health benefits in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore from policies to reduce fires by integrating information on fire emissions, atmospheric transport patterns, and popu...
Article
Full-text available
In north India, agricultural burning adversely affects local and regional air quality during the post-monsoon season (October to November), when the prevailing meteorology is favorable for smog and haze formation. Quantifying the contribution of smoke to air pollution in this region, however, is challenging. While the Moderate Resolution Imaging Sp...
Article
Full-text available
Since the Green Revolution in the mid-1960s, a widespread transition to a rice-wheat rotation in the Indian state of Punjab has led to steady increases in crop yield and production. After harvest of the summer monsoon rice crop, the burning of excess crop residue in Punjab from October to November allows for rapid preparation of fields for sowing o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Extreme smog in India widely impacts air quality in late autumn and winter months. While the links between emissions and air quality are well-recognized, the association of smog and its intensification with climatic trends in the lower troposphere, where aerosol pollution and its radiative effects manifest, are not understood well. Here we use long...
Article
Full-text available
The year 2020 brought unimaginable challenges in public health, with the confluence of the COVID-19 pandemic and wildfires across the western United States. Wildfires produce high levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ). Recent studies reported that short-term exposure to PM 2.5 is associated with increased risk of COVID-19 cases and deaths. We...
Article
Full-text available
Decadal trends in fire activity can reveal important human and climate-driven influences across a multitude of landscapes from croplands to savannas. We use 16 years of daily satellite observations from 2003 to 2018 to search globally for stationary temporal shifts in fire activity during the primary burning season. We focus on southwest Russia and...
Article
Full-text available
Many cities in India experience severe deterioration of air quality in winter. Particulate matter is a key atmospheric pollutant that impacts millions of people. In particular, the high mass concentration of particulate matter reduces visibility, which has severely damaged the economy and endangered human lives. But the underlying chemical mechanis...
Article
Full-text available
Since 2000, observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, have been used to monitor global burned area and its trends. The FireCCI and MCD64A1 products classify burned area using algorithms that detect change in surface reflectance and separately process each ∼10° × 10°...
Preprint
Full-text available
In north India, agricultural burning adversely affects local and regional air quality during the post-monsoon season (October to November), when the prevailing meteorology is favorable for smog and haze formation. While the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), aboard NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites, provides a nearly 20-year reco...
Article
Full-text available
Models of atmospheric composition rely on fire emissions inventories to reconstruct and project impacts of biomass burning on air quality, public health, climate, ecosystem dynamics, and land-atmosphere exchanges. Many such global inventories use satellite measurements of active fires and/or burned area from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectror...
Preprint
Models of atmospheric composition rely on fire emissions inventories to reconstruct and project impacts of biomass burning on air quality, public health, climate, ecosystem dynamics, and land-atmosphere exchanges. Many such global inventories use satellite measurements of active fires and/or burned area from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectror...
Preprint
Full-text available
Since the Green Revolution in the mid-1960s, a widespread transition to a rice-wheat rotation in the Indian state of Punjab has led to steady increases in crop yield and productivity. After harvest of the monsoon rice crop, the burning of excess crop residue in Punjab from October to November allows for rapid preparation of fields for sowing of the...
Article
Full-text available
Sea surface salinity (SSS) is sensitive to changes in ocean evaporation and precipitation, that is, to changes in the oceanic water cycle. Through the close connection between the oceanic and terrestrial water cycle, SSS can be used as an indicator of rainfall on land. Here we search globally for teleconnections between autumn-lead September-Octobe...
Article
Full-text available
Since at least the 1980s, many farmers in northwest India have switched to mechanized combine harvesting to boost efficiency. This harvesting technique leaves abundant crop residue on the fields, which farmers typically burn to prepare their fields for subsequent planting. A key question is to what extent the large quantity of smoke emitted by thes...
Preprint
A rising source of outdoor emissions in northwestern India is crop residue burning, occurring after the monsoon (kharif) and winter (rabi) crop harvests. In particular, post-monsoon rice residue burning, which occurs annually from October to November and is linked to increasing mechanization, coincides with meteorological conditions that enhance sh...
Article
Full-text available
Air pollution in many of India's cities exceeds national and international standards, and effective pollution control strategies require knowledge of the sources that contribute to air pollution and their spatiotemporal variability. In this study, we examine the influence of a single pollution source, outdoor biomass burning, on particulate matter...