Thorsten Treue

Thorsten Treue
University of Copenhagen · Institute of Food and Resource Economics

PhD

About

61
Publications
19,999
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1,685
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
1033 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
Unfortunately, adverse rather than positive local welfare outcomes of community-based conservation initiatives are quite common. Through the case of Burunge Wildlife Management Area (WMA) this study documents how WMAs in Tanzania appear designed to facilitate accumulation by dispossession in the name of decentralized wildlife management. Based on f...
Book
Full-text available
There is a large amount of literature on Nepalese commercial medicinal plants, fungi, and lichens. This annotated bibliography presents an overview of all literature published up to 2015, including abstracts and specification of the physical location of all references. The literature survey involved three main steps: (i) collecting, (ii) organising...
Article
This paper explains how powerful actors use scientific forestry narratives to regain power over decentralised forest resources. Through elements of trust, incentives, coercion, and avoidance forest bureaucrats convince forest user groups of the need to implement so-called scientific management and planning principles to obtain predictable harvests....
Technical Report
Full-text available
Participatory Forest Management has been shown to reaffirm domination by forest bureaucrats and other experts to the detriment of the local autonomy and decision-making that was a normative goal in and of itself as well as a key assumption underlying its promises of improving local livelihoods and forest conservation. This working paper examines th...
Article
This paper explores the forest bureaucracy's practices of implementing community forest policies in Nepal and how this shapes the realities of community forestry for forest user groups. To this end, we conducted a content analysis of community forest management plans; surveyed 74 community forest user groups; conducted intensive field observation i...
Article
Through a case-study of Arabuko-Sokoke forest, this paper investigates the potentials and limitations of participatory forest management (PFM)and forest-based income generating activities (IGAs) as conservation strategies. Based on household surveys, individual interviews, and forest transects, the paper shows how formal and especially informal ins...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) are establishments that promote wildlife conservation and rural development in Tanzania. However, through focus group discussions, key informant interviews, a questionnaire survey, and literature review, we found that the participation of local people in both the establishment and management of the WMA was limited a...
Article
Full-text available
p>Following a case study approach, this paper explains how scientific forest management plans were developed and implemented in community forests of a mid-hill district in Nepal. Field observations were carried over a period of two years (December 2014 to December 2016) in two community forests. User group members, forest officials, forest technici...
Article
Exactly how do forest bureaucracies manoeuvre to regain power and maximise benefits in the bewildering legal, financial, and administrative field of forest decentralisation? Based on a review of thirty management plans, stakeholder consultations, intensive interactions with six forest user groups, forest officials, and donor project employees in Ne...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Following a case study approach, this paper explains how scientific forest management plans were developed and how that is implemented in community forests of a Midhill district in Nepal. Field observations were carried over a period of two years (December 2014 to December 2016) in two community forests and consultations with the user groups’ membe...
Article
Full-text available
On-farm tree growing is potentially important for livelihood strategies and forest conservation, and varies greatly according to local contexts. A detailed knowledge base is therefore needed, requiring, inter alia, the documentation of factors associated with growing trees on farms. The present study surveyed 304 randomly sampled households in ten...
Article
Full-text available
Determinants of people's participation in community forestry activities in Tanahun district, Nepal were investigated through a survey of 304 households across ten community forest user groups, key informant interviews, and informal group discussions. Data were analysed through an ordered probit model as well as through the marginal effects of socio...
Article
This paper investigates how Community Based Forest Management (CBFM), when overlaid on pre-existing economic and social structures, affects rural vulnerability. Drawing on the environment entitlements and endowments framework, we analyzed the case of Ngare Ndare forest in North-Central Kenya through interviews, focus group discussions, map analyses...
Article
Natural forests and woodlands of the Eastern Arc Mountains (EAM) in Tanzania are under threat from deforestation and degradation. The estimated annual revenues from EAM hardwood for domestic use are USD 10 million in terms of planks, and twice as much when processed into furniture. Timber profits are largely captured by people whose livelihoods do...
Article
Full-text available
Community forestry has a significant role in the lives of people in Nepal as it serves the livelihood security of people to a greater extent. It is central in ensuring community participation in all the stages of CF (Community forestry) process and thus reach the objectives of sustainable forest management. However, it is quite difficult to address...
Article
Technical forest management plans have become a precondition for transferring authority to local institutions in processes of participatory forest management. The plans are intended to safeguard environmental values and are justified by their relevance in daily forest management. To serve these functions, the plans must be informed by accurate info...
Article
Full-text available
Nearly 10% of the world's total forest area is formally owned by communities and indigenous groups, yet knowledge of the effects of decentralized forest management approaches on conservation (and livelihood) impacts remains elusive. In this paper, the conservation impact of decentralized forest management on two forests in Tanzania was evaluated us...
Article
Full-text available
Tools to accurately estimate tree volume and biomass are scarce for most forest types in East Africa, including Tanzania. Based on a sample of 142 trees and 57 shrubs from a 6,065 ha area of dry miombo woodland in Iringa rural district in Tanzania, regression models were developed for volume and biomass of three important species, Brachystegia spic...
Article
Full-text available
For the majority of forest reserves in Tanzania, biodiversity is poorly documented. This study was conducted to assess species richness (woody species), diversity, and forest structure and to examine relationships between species occurrence and topographic and edaphic factors in the Gangalamtumba Village Land Forest Reserve, a dry Miombo woodland a...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 20 years, Participatory Forest Management (PFM) has become a dominant forest management strategy in Tanzania, covering more than 4.1 million hectares. Sustainable forest use and supply of wood products to local people are major aims of PFM. This paper assesses the sustainability of forest utilisation under PFM, using estimates of fore...
Article
Based on data from 1014 households in Ghana and Burkina Faso, we demonstrate that non-forest environmental products play a crucial role in rural livelihoods, especially for women and the poorest. Forest incomes are generally small but richer households and especially men from these derive comparatively higher value from forests than other groups do...
Article
Understanding the spatial distribution of the quantity and economic value of Non-Timber Forest Product (NTFP) collection gives insight into the benefits that local communities obtain from forests, and can inform decisions about the selection of forested areas that are eligible for conservation and enforcement of regulations. In this paper we estima...
Article
Mapping the distribution of the quantity and value of forest benefits to local communities is useful for forest management, when socio-economic and conservation objectives may need to be traded off. We develop a modelling approach for the economic valuation of annual Non-Timber Forest Product (NTFP) extraction at a large spatial scale, which has 4...
Article
Full-text available
Forest degradation in West Africa is generally thought to have negative consequences on rural livelihoods but there is little overview of its effects in the region because the importance of forests to rural livelihoods has never been adequately quantified. Based on data from 1014 rural households across Burkina Faso and Ghana this paper attempts to...
Article
Based on a 7year temporal comparison, the effect of joint forest management (JFM) in the New Dabaga Ulangambi Forest Reserve in the Udzungwa Mountains, Tanzania is evaluated. Using bushmeat hunting as an indicator, conservation outcomes, livelihoods effects, and changes in governance are analyzed. Results show that JFM effectively reduced bushmeat...
Article
Full-text available
Efforts to promote popular participation in forest management in Sub-Saharan Africa have faced many obstacles and disappointments. Although promises of improvements in relation to forest management, rural livelihoods and local enfranchisement have been achieved in some cases, accounts of frustration outnumber those of success. Focusing on participa...
Article
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This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.
Article
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This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.
Article
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Summary Based on a village study in Tanzania, the effects of decentralized forest management on forest conservation, rural livelihoods and good governance are evaluated. Tree growth is estimated to exceed harvest, and forest utilization appears effectively controlled. Forest revenues cover the costs of management and finance local public services,...
Article
Even after 30 years of strict de jure protection, today's de facto extraction of products from Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park (RCNP) and their great economic importance to local households suggests that this reality should be explicitly internalised in managing this world heritage park. Several studies have quantified local people's use of pro...
Chapter
Full-text available
Recent studies indicate a huge annual trade in medicinal plants from the Himalayas. Based on a national level survey of trade, this paper investigates trade in one of the most important commercial medicinal plant species from Nepal, Swertia chirayita (Roxb. ex Flem.) Karst. The survey was conducted along the marketing chain from the hills of Nepal...
Chapter
During the implementation of the Forest Resouree Management Projeet and other associated forestry sector related projects, a process of revising the 1948 forest policy took place. It was not diffieult to see that the 1948 policy on several points had been outdated for some time. Particularly the environmental and economic wisdom of continuing a del...
Chapter
In 1985, the British Government signed a UK£ 1.146 million aid project with the Government of Ghana to undertake a forest inventory in the high forest zone of Ghana, “the Forest Inventory Project” (FIP). This project was implemented during the period 1985–89 by the Forestry Department, Ghana (FD) with ODA employed expatriate assistance (long and sh...
Chapter
The timber harvest may be regulated through demand-side and supply-side measures. Both are politically determined, but they work in different ways and have different strengths and weaknesses. In practice, none of the two can stand alone in a politically regulated timber market as the case is for Ghana. How weIl demand-side measures can function dep...
Chapter
Under the forestry component of the Export Rehabilitation Project provision was actually made for two special studies to look into (Silviconsult, 1985; 1): Strategy Proposals for the Forestry Sector; Forestry Department Review and Study of the requirements of the Forest Products Inspection Bureau (FPIB) and the Timber Export Development Board (TEDB...
Chapter
Ghana is situated on the West African Continent. To the North, West, East and South the country is bordered by Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Togo and the Gulf of Guinea, respectively.
Chapter
Today the high forest zone is dominated by farmland (including fallow and some plantations), with forest and wildlife reserves covering approximately 20% of the zone (Hawthorne and Musha, 1993; 4). However, in terms of timber the standing volume is not confined to the forest reserves only. Farm and fallow land in the high forest zone carry a substa...
Chapter
In 1988, a UK£ 3.7 million agreement was signed between ODA and the Government of Ghana to essentially continue the FIP under a new name, the Forest Inventory and Management Project (FIMP). This project was designed to work within the framework of the wider World Bank, Danida, ODA and Government of Ghana sponsored UK£ 20.2 million forestry sector p...
Chapter
The export of wood products and the timber industry as such are prominent in Ghana’s economy. Estimates suggest that the timber industry accounts for 4–7% of GDP, and that wood exports represent some 18% of exports (Overseas Consultancy Service, 1995; 16–17).
Chapter
As mentioned in the previous chapters it is necessary to distinguish between on- and off-reserve timber harvest in order to assess the sustainability of timber harvest in the high forest zone. This chapter attempts to combine the on- and off-reserve inventory results with the available information about the on- and off-reserve timber harvest.
Chapter
The previous chapters have reviewed the “technical evidence” sustaining that the timber resource and certain forest areas in Southern Ghana are being degraded, and that the speed of degradation forms an immediate threat of economic extinction for some species. Furthermore, the substantial off-reserve timber harvest and the industry’s export driven...
Chapter
Standing timber in Ghana is not sold on a free and open market. Until December, 1998 logging companies operated on a concession basis and concessions were allocated by the Government through the Ministry of Lands and Forests. With the Timber Resources Management Act (1997) and the Timber Resources Management Regulations (1998), timber rights are no...
Chapter
The distribution of rights to timber and to benefits brought about by timber harvest is one of the most critical forest policy matters in Ghana. Right over land are closely linked with rights to trees and timber, and the issue of promoting sustainable forest management or sustained yield timber production may be divided into the following main poin...
Chapter
The present study is the result of studying the technical, political and economic development of high forest management in Ghana during the period 1991–99. In addition to the collection of data specifically for the thesis we have undertaken or participated in four consultancies in Ghana, which were all related to political and economic issues of hi...
Article
For the last two decades the loss of, in particular, tropical rainforest has alarmed the public in the developed parts of the world. The debate has been characterised by a lack of understand­ ing of the causes and effects of the process, leading to the prevailing reaction being unquali­ fied condemnation. Such attitude has even been observed among...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
We aim to (i) develop interdisciplinary data integration and up-scaling techniques to identify realistic transition pathways for renewable resources, that (ii) promote the development of a feasible bioeconomy approach in low-income countries.
Project
Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural teaching and research on sustainable land use and natural resource management. Sluse is a collaboration between various Universities from Denmark, Malaysia, Thailand, South Africa, Botswana, Swaziland, Kenya, and Cambodia. The collaboration started in 1998 and continues until today (although the partners have changed) See more on http://sluse.dk
Project
Trade has the potential to drive the transition to a green economy by promoting sustainable resource use, generating inclusive employment, and contributing to poverty alleviation. However, lack of empirically-based knowledge renders this transition difficult. This research project will investigate how the transition to green growth can be undertaken in the medicinal and aromatic plant (MAP) sector in Nepal. The sector involves millions of people and has potential to promote pro-poor employment and earnings as well as sustainable resource use. The project focuses on (i) identifying, describing and quantifying global production networks for MAPs traded in and from Nepal to India and China, and (ii) socially equitable employment potential by identifying points of intervention that enhance inclusive job creation, increase earnings and their redistribution, and promote sustainable resource use. Data is generated through global production network actor interviews, from harvesters through traders to end consumers and regulatory bodies, and ecological inventories. To generate knowledge to support the transit to green growth in the commercial MAP sector in Nepal, the project has the specific objectives: 1. To provide improved understanding of the dynamics of global production networks for MAPs traded in and from Nepal a. Identify, describe and quantify MAP transnational production networks from Nepal to India and China, vertically and horizontally b. Assess the sustainability of harvest of valuable commercial MAP species c. Determine the factors influencing MAP demand in final consumption countries (Nepal, India, China) d. Analyse the institutional context of the transnational production networks, with focus on Nepal e. Assess the impact of transnational production network dynamics on rural household incomes in marginalized producer communities in Nepal The project is developed and managed by the University of Copenhagen, the Federation of Community Forestry Users in Nepal, Tribhuvan University and the Agriculture and Forestry University in Nepal, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.