Thomas Watts

Thomas Watts
Monash University (Australia)

PhD

About

9
Publications
883
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
73
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
73 Citations
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2019 - October 2021
Nanyang Technological University
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2018 - October 2019
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
March 2014 - January 2019
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Molecular microbiology and biochemistry

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Toxins produced by the Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens are primarily encoded by genes found on different conjugative plasmids. These plasmids encode highly similar replication proteins and therefore should be incompatible, but they are often found to coexist within the same isolate.
Article
The spore-forming, anaerobic Gram positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens encodes many of its disease-causing toxins on closely related conjugative plasmids. Studies of the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3 have identified many of the genes involved in conjugative transfer, which are located in the tcp conjugation locus. Upstream of this locus...
Article
Virulence Plasmids of the Pathogenic Clostridia, Page 1 of 2 Abstract The clostridia cause a spectrum of diseases in humans and animals ranging from life-threatening tetanus and botulism, uterine infections, histotoxic infections and enteric diseases, including antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and food poisoning. The symptoms of all these diseases...
Article
Conjugative transfer is a major contributor to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes in the human and animal pathogen, Clostridium perfringens. The C. perfringens plasmid pCW3 is the archetype of an extensive family of highly related conjugative toxin and antibiotic resistance plasmids found in this bacterium. These plasmid...
Preprint
Plasmids that encode the same replication machinery are generally unable to coexist in the same bacterial cell. However, Clostridium perfringens strains often carry multiple conjugative toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that are closely related and encode similar Rep proteins. In many bacteria, plasmid partitioning upon cell division involves...
Article
Full-text available
A major virulence factor in Clostridium sordellii-mediated infection is the toxin TcsL, which is encoded within a region of the genome called the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc). C. sordellii isolates carry the PaLoc on the pCS1 family of plasmids, of which there are four characterized members. Here, we determined the potential mobility of pCS1 plasmid...
Article
Clostridium perfringens produces an extensive repertoire of toxins and extracellular enzymes, many of which are intimately involved in the progression of disease and are encoded by genes on conjugative plasmids. In addition, many C. perfringens strains can carry up to five of these conjugative toxin or antimicrobial resistance plasmids, each of whi...
Article
Many pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens carry several highly similar toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that have 35 to 40 kb of very closely related syntenous sequences, including regions that carry the genes encoding conjugative transfer, plasmid replication and plasmid maintenance functions. Key questions are how are these closel...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
This question may be a little naive, but I've never seen anyone use blue white screening in a gram-positive bacteria before and wanted to know why! I know you need lacZM15 mutants in E. coli, but I was thinking about using lacZ as a reporter to look at expression driven by an enterococcus promoter in the context of different mutant backgrounds. I thought it would be good to be able to initially screen a lot of them qualitatively on a plate with X-gal.

Network

Cited By