Thomas Thurnell-Read

Thomas Thurnell-Read
Loughborough University | Lough · Scool of Social Sciences and Humanities

About

47
Publications
6,551
Reads
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776
Citations
Citations since 2017
28 Research Items
596 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
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Introduction
Thomas has over a decade of experience researching alcohol consumption and drinking culture and is internationally recognised as a leading scholar of sociological approaches to the study of alcohol, drinking and drunkenness. He is the editor of Drinking Dilemmas: Space, culture and identity (Routledge, 2015), is a founding member of the British Sociological Association’s Alcohol Study Group and has presented his research to diverse audiences in the UK, Denmark, Portugal, France, Sweden, Japan and Taiwan. He has extensive experience of media engagement and public dissemination and his research has featured in The Observer; The Conversation; Vice.com; The Morning Advertiser; and on BBC Radio 4’s Thinking Allowed.

Publications

Publications (47)
Chapter
In this chapter, we review debates relating to addiction and treatment. Recognising that the terms addiction and addict are fiercely contested, we examine the emergence of the concept of addiction as a process involving the struggle between various groups to define what problematic relationships with alcohol and drugs are and how they should be res...
Chapter
This concluding chapter reviews the main themes of the book and briefly traces some key strands of insight that have run throughout the book. This includes revisiting the three scales—self, state and society—that have underpinned the focus of the book. In a section titled ‘The Futures of Intoxication’, we then close the book by making speculations...
Chapter
In this chapter we consider recent developments which have seen new substances and new cultures around their use emerge in what we term the ‘design’ of novel substances. This starts with a discussion of the regulatory challenges posed by so-called Novel Psychoactive Substances. We then explore the trend for use of substances that are used with the...
Chapter
In this chapter we offer an overview of the historical emergence of alcohol and drugs and examine how attitudes and responses to intoxication have changed over time. This starts by looking at the pre-modern origins of intoxication before considering how a number of processes related to the advent of the modern era have shaped understandings and att...
Chapter
In this chapter we explore the regulation of intoxication and review the various approaches to the control of alcohol and drunkenness. Following a brief review of the historical development of alcohol legislation in the UK, it is to the US that we turn for the most prominent example of an attempt to eradicate alcohol from society through state-wide...
Chapter
In this chapter we review some of the most prominent theories used to explain the place of alcohol and drugs in society. We start with an acknowledgement of the physiological basis of intoxication as a state created in the human body but soon move on to set out how anthropological, sociological and criminological approaches to intoxication locate s...
Chapter
In the last of three chapters exploring the diverse ways in which identity and inequality shape experiences of and attitudes to intoxication, we look at the role of race, ethnicity, nation and religion. We start this with a consideration of the concept of national drinking cultures. We then tackle the racist ideologies underpinning both historical...
Chapter
In this chapter, we consider how experiences of intoxication are shaped by gender and sexuality. Whilst we note that alcohol, in particular, has historically been the preserve of men, it is in recent decades that women’s drinking has become more widespread and, with it, more frequently addressed in academic and public debates. We then consider how...
Chapter
In the second of two chapters addressing the regulation of intoxication, we review both historical and contemporary drug control policies. First we focus on legislation in the UK and US designed to prohibit the production, supply and consumption of illicit drugs. We then explore the assortment of draconian and often militarised policies which have...
Article
Full-text available
While it is well established that alcohol consumption is a gendered practice, the supposedly more progressive ethos of the emerging craft drinks sector suggests the possibility for great gender equality. However, as a growing body of research shows, craft drinks cultures, and that of craft beer in particular, remain heavily gendered with a number o...
Chapter
In many cultures, alcohol consumption is interwoven into the cultural traditions and ceremonies surrounding key occasions in the life course. Often, drinking alcohol is integrated into the customs of courtship and marriage (Bennett, 2004; Heath, 2000). Weddings are a particularly significant occasion in the life course of most people living in West...
Chapter
This book is about alcohol and its role in people’s lives. Lives which unfold as we age and move in and out of different roles and responsibilities and across which alcohol, drinking and drunkenness are likely to offer different rewards, pose diverse risks and harms and mean different things. Consistent with wider developments in social theory emph...
Article
Full-text available
The reappearance of VHS skateboarding movies produced during the 1990s on YouTube presents a timely opportunity to examine how the subcultural identities of former skateboarders are reassessed in later life. Drawing on subcultural studies and theories of mediated memory, this article analyses comments made by viewers of YouTube re-postings of 411 V...
Article
Full-text available
While the form and function of pubs is diverse and has changed over time, there remains an at least notional consensus that the pub plays an important social function by providing a place for people to come together in pleasurable and meaningful social interaction. Drawing on qualitative research involving focus groups with pub goers and interviews...
Article
Ale Trails, where a series of pubs noted for serving real ale and craft beer are linked together along a prescribed route followed either on foot or by bus or train, are now a well-established activity in the UK and beyond. However, in some cases they have become associated with large groups of rowdy drinkers characterised by excessive consumption...
Article
While there is a tradition of viewing both craftwork and entrepreneurship as characteristically individualistic and autonomous activities, this article examines the way in which social ties of family and kinship are often integral to many entrepreneurial ventures. Instead of a neat divide between ‘separate spheres’, work and home permeate each othe...
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Full-text available
This special issue of Boyhood Studies considers how a group of international scholars have engaged with the concepts of boyhood and belonging as a complex personal and powerful process. In different ways, the authors highlight how belonging is an ongoing negotiation within one’s surroundings. The international research presented here compels us to...
Article
There is a long academic tradition which positions the desire for authenticity as emerging as a symptom of dissatisfactions with modernity. Most recently, this has involved consumption of products that are valued for being authentic in contrast to mass produced commodities which are seen as being homogeneous, standardized and therefore inauthentic....
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While the increased scale and importance of international students to the UK Higher Education sector is now well established, little is known about the ways in which students from non-UK countries experience and interact with the heavy drinking culture that predominates on and near many British universities. Drawing on qualitative interviews, this...
Article
The concept of the Bucket List has achieved rapid and widespread recognition. This article makes an original Critical Discourse Analysis of the Bucket List as a cultural phenomenon that provides important insights into the interrelation between identity and tourism. The Bucket List is used to communicate specific suggestions of desirable tourism ex...
Article
Recent years have seen changes in the practice of beer consumption, which appear to indicate raised standards of cultural prestige. This article focuses on the practice of Real Ale consumption, which has been promoted by the UK consumer pressure group, the Campaign for Real Ale, since 1971, and analyses how beer consumption has achieved an increase...
Chapter
Full-text available
PurposeTo reflect on the central role of gender and age in qualitative research practice, particularly in regard to how the gender and age of the researcher influence fieldwork interactions. Methodology/approachA reflection of three separate qualitative research undertakings, all of which made use of interviews and participant-observation fieldwork...
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Full-text available
While the real and perceived excesses of ‘binge drinking’ have received considerable attention in policy, media and academic debates, the concept of ‘sensible drinking’ is poorly defined and has rarely been subject to empirical analysis. Using qualitative research, this article explores the drinking discourses of ale enthusiasts as a means of highl...
Article
Full-text available
The article uses the concept of serious leisure to explain the leisure commitments made by members of the British consumer campaign group the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) and that of Real Ale enthusiasts in general. Drawing on in-depth qualitative research including interviews with CAMRA branch members and staff, the article demonstrates that beer...
Chapter
Full-text available
The emergence in recent decades of the stag tour as a premarital ritual undertaken by large numbers of British men sheds new, and at times vivid, light on an array of connections linking notions of masculinity and travel. Starting with cities such as Amsterdam and Dublin in the 1990s, the stag tour ‘phenomenon’ soon spread east, with destinations i...
Conference Paper
While the implicit masculine position of the tourist gaze has been identified and problematised, understandings of specific male tourists has often failed to engage with the gendered notions of independence, adventure, embodiment and ‘risk’ which underpin much tourism experience and practice. Drawing on the author’s own ethnographic study of Britis...
Conference Paper
Since its formation in 1971, the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) has been a frequent, if at times contentious and often derided, voice in debates relating to British drinking culture, the drinks industry and, by association, contemporary leisure. This paper explores the various ways in which CAMRA has sought to challenge and influence consumer tastes...
Article
Full-text available
In offering particular intrinsic rewards, craftwork has been situated in recent debates as a possible antidote to some of the alienating features of work in modern capitalist societies. The revival of traditional beer in the UK, led by the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), has provided the context in which a proliferation of small-scale breweries has...
Article
Full-text available
The cultural linkages between the drinking of alcohol and the assertion of masculinity have been well explored. In particular drinking alcohol is still assumed to be a site where masculinity can be tested and proved. However, equally, drinking can be seen to undermine and discredit the male body. further, older men's drinking practices are commonly...
Article
The article explores the premarital all-male stag tour made by groups of British men to an Eastern European city as a homosocial bonding ritual. Homosocial groups help sustain hegemonic masculinity and play a significant role in establishing accepted forms of masculinity. Male friendships have been characterized as lacking in intimacy and typically...
Article
The British premarital stag tour to Central and Eastern European destinations is commonly associated with drunk and unruly behaviour. This link frequently focuses on the inappropriate use of public spaces by stag tour groups. Drawing on participant observation with British stag tourists Krakow, Poland, it is suggested that the meanings attributed t...
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Full-text available
Entrenched conceptions of masculinity have constructed the male body as bounded and controlled. This article discusses the centrality of a particular construction of the male body to the phenomenon of British premarital stag party tourism to Eastern European cities. Drawing on data from participant-observation in Kraków, Poland, it is shown that th...
Article
Full-text available
The article reflects on the experience of conducting participatory research with all-male premarital stag tour groups in Krakow, Poland. The research therefore concerns the performative and embodied aspects of hegemonic male behaviour that are encouraged and enacted by the British men who take part in such tours. Vital to the process of gaining an...
Article
This article considers the experiences of young travellers visiting the site of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in Poland. Semi-structured interviews were used to generate qualitative data on the way individuals approach, engage with and interpret their experience of visiting Auschwitz. In analysing findings from interviews, this paper fo...
Article
This thesis explores the recent phenomenon of premarital stag party tours made to Eastern European cities by groups of British men. It is based on ethnographic field research in Krakow, Poland, conducted over the course of one year. The use of qualitative methods, primarily participant-observation, allows for the exploration of the in situ meanings...
Article
As an occupation, firefighting is replete with images of maleness operating around a series of highly masculinised codes and values most notably comprising: risk/danger, heroism, fearlessness/courage, physicality, and bodily strength. This qualitative study of the UK Fire Service seeks to uncover the ways in which these masculine codes and values w...

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