Thomas E Sheridan

Thomas E Sheridan
The University of Arizona | UA · Southwest Center and School of Anthropology

Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Arizona

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54
Publications
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886
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
292 Citations
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Introduction
I am a historical and environmental anthropologist who works primarily in the U.S. Southwest and Northern Mexico. I have an abiding interest in ranching, collaborative conservation, real estate speculation, and the preservation of large, unfragmented rural landscapes in the American West. I also have devoted much of my career to the study of the interactions of Native peoples like the Comcaac (Seri) and Hopi with the Spanish empire, combining documentary research and Native oral traditions.

Publications

Publications (54)
Book
The first of a two-volume series, Moquis and Kastiilam tells the story of the encounter between the Hopis, who the Spaniards called Moquis, and the Spaniards, who the Hopis called Kastiilam, from the first encounter in 1540 until the eve of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. By comparing and contrasting Spanish documents with Hopi oral traditions, the edit...
Article
The following document and interview constitute the first chapter in Volume I of Moquis and Kastiilam: Hopis, Spaniards, and the Trauma of History. When published, the two volumes will tell, from both Hopi and Spanish points of view, the story of Spanish attempts to conquer and missionize the Hopi Indians of northeastern Arizona between 1540, when...
Article
In 1871 an O’odham war party slipped north of the Salt River and attacked a group of Yavapais below Four Peaks in the Mazatzal Mountains. The Pimas killed most of the adults but took the children captive, including a little boy named Wassaja. They sold him to an Italian photographer named Carlos Gentile for thirty dollars, and Gentile renamed him C...
Article
The modern American West is one of the most contested landscapes in the world, yet anthropologists are just beginning to grapple with its dynamic political ecology. Since World War II, the West has been transformed from an overwhelmingly rural landscape dominated by extractive industries to an overwhelmingly urban landscape characterized by explosi...
Article
This is a slightly modified version of chapter eight in Landscapes of Fraud: Mission Tumácacori, the Baca Float, and the Betrayal of the O'odham, published in 2006 by the University of Arizona Press. Landscapes of Fraud explores how the Upper Santa Cruz River Valley of southern Arizona was transformed from a landscape of community occupied by O'odh...
Article
The first biography of an eighteenth-century Basque immigrant who became a silver miner, cattle rancher, and commander of the cavalry in Sonora, Mexico. For this comprehensive biography of Anza, Garate spent more than ten years researching archives in Spain and the Americas. The result is a striking and important account of the Spanish borderlands...
Article
Hispanic American Historical Review 84.3 (2004) 523-525 A Settling of Accounts is the sixth and final volume in the Journals of don Diego de Vargas, the series that noted historian John Kessell initiated and which, as Kessell graciously acknowledges in his preface, his three coeditors have carried through to conclusion. The series focuses on one of...
Article
Despite the rapid urbanization of the Arizona-Sonora borderlands, cattle ranching continues to play a major, if increasingly contested, political, economic, and ecological role in the region. Unlike other industries, technological manipulation has failed to increase productivity in the range cattle industry. The constraints of aridity and climatic...
Article
Hailed as a model state history thanks to Thomas E. Sheridan's thoughtful analysis and lively interpretation of the people and events shaping the Grand Canyon State, "Arizona" has become a standard in the field. Now, just in time for Arizona's centennial, Sheridan has revised and expanded this already top-tier state history to incorporate events an...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I argue that the emerging research strategy of political ecology needs to incorporate an active nature into its analysis of the commodification of natural resources and the politics of resource control. I make reference to earlier work among small rancher-farmers in Cucurpe, Sonora, where the nature of the crucial resources themselve...
Article
The Spanish conquest of the Americas was one of the most dramatic cultural and biological transformations in the history of the world. Small groups of conquistadores toppled enormous empires. Millions of Native Americans died from epidemic disease. Old World animals and plants revolutionized Native American societies, while New World crops fundamen...
Article
Originally a presidio on the frontier of New Spain, Tucson was a Mexican community before the arrival of Anglo settlers. Unlike most cities in California and Texas, Tucson was not initially overwhelmed by Anglo immigrants, so that even until the early 1900s Mexicans made up a majority of the town's population. Indeed, it was through the efforts of...
Article
The Seri Indians of coastal Sonora. Mexico, are perhaps the least known of the surviving Indian groups of North America. Not surprisingly, reconstructions of Seri social organization have reflected, often uncritically, the ongoing anthropological debate about the nature of hunter-gatherer societies in general. Most modem studies conclude that abori...
Article
In southwestern North America, agriculture is limited by both arable land and available water supplies. In the upper Rio San Miguel, as well as in other narrow river valleys of eastern Sonora, Mexico, floodplain farming is dependent upon living fencerows for its environmental stability. Propagated fencerows of willow and cottonwood maintain, extend...
Article
Spanish colonial documents verify exploitation of eelgrass seeds as a major food resource by the Seri and possibly other Indian groups along the mainland coast of northwestern Mexico at least as early as the 17th century. Use of this unique marine seed plant was apparently common knowledge among local Jesuit missionaries.
Article
Full-text available
The Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) is both an archive of past ecological research and a laboratory for continuing research embedded in the southern Arizona landscape. The scientific questions being asked there have changed over the last 100 years, but SRER with its monitoring stations and its legacy of repeat photography still offers a unique...
Article
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, 1983. Reproduction. Includes bibliographical references.

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