Thomas A A Prowse

Thomas A A Prowse
University of Adelaide · Environment Institute

BSc (Hons), PhD

About

77
Publications
22,780
Reads
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2,036
Citations
Citations since 2017
40 Research Items
1592 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300
20172018201920202021202220230100200300
20172018201920202021202220230100200300
Additional affiliations
February 2009 - present
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2004 - January 2008
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (77)
Article
Long‐term biodiversity monitoring programs provide important information about species’ trajectories and broader environmental change. Often constrained by funding and organisational capability and commitment, monitoring programs need to be optimised to maximise ecological and economic efficiencies, as part of sound adaptive management. The monitor...
Article
Full-text available
Flying foxes provide ecologically and economically important ecosystem services but extensive clearing and modification of habitat and drought combined with the planting of commercial and non-commercial trees across various landscapes, has meant flying foxes in Australia are increasingly seeking foraging resources in new areas. In 2011, grey-headed...
Article
Phenotypic diversity occurs in natural populations as a result of the interaction between an individual's genotype and the environment. Nevertheless, individual variation in phenotypic traits such as coat colour and body size is routinely used to differentiate between “pure” dingoes Canis dingo and dingo‐dog hybrids. Extensive anthropogenic impacts...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Movement is the major contributor to active energy expenditure in most vertebrates and it is regularly characterised by body acceleration that can be captured by animal-attached accelerometers (ACC). Overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) is a metric derived from ACC data, which can be used as a proxy for energy expenditure over fine t...
Article
Many infectious pathogens can be transmitted by highly mobile species, like bats that can act as reservoir hosts for viruses such as henipaviruses, lyssaviruses and coronaviruses. In this study, we investigated the seroepidemiology of protein antigens to Severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS‐CoV‐1) and Middle eastern respiratory syndrome vi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background As in many other settings, peak excess mortality preceded the officially reported ‘first wave’ peak of the COVID-19 epidemic in Manaus, Brazil, reflecting delayed case recognition and limited initial access to diagnostic testing. Methods and Findings To avoid early information bias, we used detailed age and gender stratified death certi...
Article
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Habitat-mediated global change is driving shifts in species’ distributions which can alter the spatial risks associated with emerging zoonotic pathogens. Many emerging infectious pathogens are transmitted by highly mobile species, including bats, which can act as spill-over hosts for pathogenic viruses. Over three years, we investigated the seroepi...
Article
Past and continuing fragmentation and modification of ecosystems, as well as other threatening processes, cause ongoing biodiversity losses and species extinctions in Australia. At the same time as biodiversity declines, government funding for conservation and restoration is diminishing, leading to reduced action and greater reliance on private inv...
Article
Invasive rodents impact biodiversity, human health and food security worldwide. The biodiversity impacts are particularly significant on islands, which are the primary sites of vertebrate extinctions and where we are reaching the limits of current control technologies. Gene drives may represent an effective approach to this challenge, but knowledge...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species pose a major threat to biodiversity on islands. While successes have been achieved using traditional removal methods, such as toxicants aimed at rodents, these approaches have limitations and various off-target effects on island ecosystems. Gene drive technologies designed to eliminate a population provide an alternative approach,...
Article
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A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper.
Article
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Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag technology permits the “resighting” of animals tagged for ecological research without the need for physical re‐trapping. Whilst this is effective if animals pass within centimeters of tag readers, short‐distance detection capabilities have prevented the use of this technology with many species. To address th...
Article
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Surgical adhesive is widely used to prevent shedding of injected PIT-tags, but the effect of this adhesive on individuals has not been documented. We recaptured 52 southern bent-winged bats up to 741 days after PIT-tagging. All recaptured individuals were in good body condition, with no signs of infection or skin irritation; however, temporary fur...
Article
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Protected areas are critical for the long-term conservation of biodiversity globally. Across agricultural landscapes, protected areas serve as refuges for threatened and declining species and provide valuable ecosystem services that support broader landscape function. However, increasing pressure on protected areas from a range of sources is underm...
Article
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Billions of hectares of natural ecosystems have been degraded through human actions. The global community has agreed on targets to halt and reverse these declines, and the restoration sector faces the important but arduous task of implementing programmes to meet these objectives. Existing and emerging genomics tools offer the potential to improve t...
Article
A transdisciplinary review of the current academic knowledge of Indigenous traditional fire management is presented for the Mt Lofty Ranges in South Australia. For a long time, the roles of Indigenous management of the landscape have either been overlooked or discounted within environmental studies. That situation is beginning to change in many par...
Article
• In Australia, the dingo Canis lupus dingo is the largest terrestrial predator. Dingoes contribute to ecological processes and functions throughout their continental geographic range. Their generalist diet enables daily energetic requirements to be met even in the resource‐limited deserts of central Australia, where irregular rainfall drives extre...
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Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA) quantifies microscopic scar or wear patterns left on teeth by different foods or extraneous ingested items such as grit. It can be a powerful tool for deducing the diets of extinct mammals. Here we investigate how intraspecific variation in the dental microwear of macropodids (kangaroos and their close relat...
Article
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Quantitative models are powerful tools for informing conservation management and decision-making. As applied modeling is increasingly used to address conservation problems, guidelines are required to clarify the scope of modeling applications and to facilitate the impact and acceptance of models by practitioners. We identify three key roles for qua...
Article
Full-text available
Self-replicating gene drives that modify sex ratios or infer a fitness cost could be used to control populations of invasive alien species. The targeted deletion of Y sex chromosomes using CRISPR technology offers a new approach for sex bias that could be incorporated within gene-drive designs. We introduce a novel gene-drive strategy termed Y-CHro...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative models are powerful tools for informing conservation management and decision‐making. As applied modeling is increasingly used to address conservation problems, guidelines are required to clarify the scope of modeling applications and to facilitate the impact and acceptance of models by practitioners. We identify three key roles for qua...
Preprint
Full-text available
Invasive species pose a major threat to biodiversity on islands. While successes have been achieved using traditional removal methods, such as toxicants aimed at rodents, these approaches have limitations and various off-target effects on island ecosystems. Gene drive technologies designed to suppress a population provide an alternative approach, b...
Article
ContextPseudogymnoascus destructans is the fungus responsible for white-nose syndrome (WNS), which has killed millions of hibernating bats in North America, but also occurs in bats in Europe and China without causing large-scale population effects. This is likely to be due to differences in species susceptibility and behaviour, and environmental fa...
Article
Accelerometers are a valuable tool for studying animal behaviour and physiology where direct observation is unfeasible. However, giving biological meaning to multivariate acceleration data is challenging. Here, we describe a method that reliably classifies a large number of behaviours using tri-axial accelerometer data collected at the low sampling...
Article
Bonamia spp. parasites threaten flat oyster (Ostrea spp.) farming worldwide. Understanding test performance is important for designing surveillance and interpreting diagnostic results. Following a pilot survey which found low Bonamia sp. intensity in farmed Ostrea angasi, we tested further oysters (n = 100–150) from each of three farms for Bonamia...
Article
Synthetic gene drives offer a novel solution for the control of invasive alien species. CRISPR-based gene drives can positively bias their own inheritance, and comprise a DNA sequence that is replicated by homologous recombination. Since gene drives can be positioned to silence fertility or developmental genes, they could be used for population sup...
Article
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Effective fisheries management generally requires reliable data describing the target species’ life-history characteristics, the size of its harvested populations, and overall catch estimates, to set sustainable quotas and management regulations. However, stock assessments are often not available for long-lived marine species such as sharks, making...
Article
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Environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding can greatly enhance our understanding of global biodiversity and our ability to detect rare or cryptic species. However, sampling effort must be considered when interpreting results from these surveys. We explored how sampling effort influenced biodiversity patterns and nonindigenous species (NIS) detection in...
Article
1. Exploiting synergies among diseases or parasites could increase the efficacy of biological control of invasive species. In Australia, two viruses were introduced to control European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus: myxoma virus in 1950 and rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus in 1995. While these biological controls caused initial declines of > 95% i...
Article
Effective fisheries management generally requires reliable data describing the target species' life-history characteristics, the size of its harvested populations, and overall catch estimates, to set sustainable quotas and management regulations. However, stock assessments are often not available for long-lived marine species such as sharks, making...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the spatial distribution of human impacts on marine environments is necessary for maintaining healthy ecosystems and supporting 'blue economies'. Realistic assessments of impact must consider the cumulative impacts of multiple, coincident threats and the differing vulnerabilities of ecosystems to these threats. Expert knowledge is oft...
Article
The eggs of marine species with planktotrophic development must contain, at a minimum, sufficient material for production of a larva that can then sequester additional materials to grow and metamorphose successfully. In echinoderms, lipids perform crucial energy storage and structural functions during larval construction, but their roles during lat...
Article
Prescribed burning is a commonly adopted fire-management strategy that attempts to protect human life and assets by removing accumulated, flammable biomass. Heterogeneous burning patterns are often favoured in an attempt to balance fuel-reduction and biodiversity goals under the ‘pyrodiversity begets biodiversity’ paradigm. Using comprehensive spat...
Article
Progressive body-size dwarfing of animal populations is predicted under chronic mortality stress, such as that inflicted by human harvesting. However, empirical support for such declines in body size due to elevated mortality is lacking. In fact, the size of three macropodid species ─ the two grey kangaroo species, Macropus fuliginosus and M. gigan...
Article
Self-replicating gene drives that can spread deleterious alleles through animal populations have been promoted as a much needed but controversial ‘silver bullet’ for controlling invasive alien species. Homing-based drives comprise an endonuclease and a guide RNA (gRNA) that are replicated during meiosis via homologous recombination. However, their...
Article
Full-text available
The pangolin is greatly sought after for its various body parts, largely driven by demand from China. The mammal has been driven to the edge of extinction in Asia, with two Asian species listed as Critically Endangered in the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. With declining Asian pangolin populations, a shift in trade from As...
Article
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The reproduction of many species is determined by seasonally-driven resource supply. But it is difficult to quantify whether the fecundity is sensitive to short- or long-term exposure to environmental conditions such as rainfall that drive resource supply. Using 25 years of data on individual fecundity of European female rabbits, Oryctolagus cunicu...
Article
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Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to ch...
Article
Stochastic simulation models requiring many input parameters are widely used to inform the management of ecological systems. The interpretation of complex models is aided by global sensitivity analysis, using simulations for distinct parameter sets sampled from multidimensional space. Ecologists typically analyze such output using an “emulator”; th...
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Effective biosecurity is necessary to protect nations and their citizens from a variety of threats, including emerging infectious diseases, agricultural or environmental pests and pathogens, and illegal wildlife trade. The physical pathways by which these threats are transported internationally, predominantly shipping and air traffic, have undergon...
Article
The Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) is a declared alien pest species on Kangaroo Island, South Australia, where it is implicated in a range of social problems and potential ecological impacts. To inform the management of feral peafowl, we aimed to (1) provide an estimate of peafowl distribution and abundance; (2) measure peafowl home ranges; (3) ca...
Article
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Biological invasions have the potential to cause extensive ecological and economic damage. Maritime trade facilitates biological invasions by transferring species in ballast water, and on ships' hulls. With volumes of maritime trade increasing globally, efforts to prevent these biological invasions are of significant importance. Both the Internatio...
Article
Geographic body-size variation characterises many mammal species. Hypotheses centring around heat conservation, heat dissipation, primary productivity and seasonality have been advanced to explain geographic body-size patterns. However, identification of the primary body-size drivers has often been hampered by a paucity of data for broadly distribu...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the population trajectory and dynamics of many marine invertebrates because of a lack of robust observational data. The giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) is IUCN-listed as Near Threatened because the largest known breeding aggregation of this species in northern Spencer Gulf, South Australia, has declined markedly sinc...
Article
1.The conservation of terrestrial carnivores is hampered by economic conflicts between predation and livestock production. Dingoes Canis dingo are the top predator in Australia's terrestrial ecosystems but their abundance is controlled because they prey on livestock. Dingo control (poisoning, shooting) is associated with increased densities of wild...
Article
1.Life-history theory predicts the progressive dwarfing of animal populations that are subjected to chronic mortality stress but the evolutionary impact of harvesting terrestrial herbivores has seldom been tested. In Australia, marsupials of the genus Macropus (kangaroos and wallabies) are subjected to size-selective commercial harvesting. Mathemat...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Spencer Gulf is the most significant economic growth area in South Australia. A lack of deep-water port facilities to meet export capacity has led to a number of companies proposing new port developments. An increase in shipping to the region is expected associated with mining and other infrastructure developments. Upper Spencer Gulf (USG) is world...
Article
The mass extinction events during human prehistory are striking examples of ecological regime shifts, the causes of which are still hotly debated. In Australia, human arrival approximately 50 thousand years ago was associated with the continental-scale extinction of numerous marsupial megafauna species and a permanent change in vegetation structure...
Article
One of the strongest generalities in invasion biology is the positive relationship between probability of establishment and the numbers of individuals introduced. Nevertheless, a number of significant questions remain regarding: (1) the relative importance of different processes during introduction (e.g., demographic, environmental, and genetic sto...
Article
To investigate potential range shifts in a changing climate it is becoming increasingly common to develop models that account for demographic processes. Metapopulation models incorporate the spatial configuration of occupied habitat (i.e. arrangement, size and quality), population demographics, and inter-patch dispersal making them suitable for inv...
Article
Full-text available
A central paradigm in invasion biology is that more releases of higher numbers of individuals increase the likelihood that an exotic population successfully establishes and persists. Recently, however, it has been suggested that, in cases where the data are sourced from historical records of purposefully released species, the direction of causality...
Article
Population viability analysis (PVA) is widely used to assess the extinction risk of threatened species and to evaluate different management strategies. However, conventional PVA neglects important biotic interactions and therefore can fail to identify important threatening processes. We designed a new PVA approach that includes species interactions...
Article
Many species of marine invertebrate larvae settle and metamorphose in response to chemicals produced by organisms associated with the adult habitat, and histamine is a cue for larvae of the sea urchin Holopneustes purpurascens. This study investigated the effect of histamine on larval metamorphosis of six sea urchin species. Histamine induced metam...
Article
Vitellogenin genes (vtg) encode large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) that are typically female-specific, functioning as precursors to major yolk proteins (MYPs). Within the phylum Echinodermata, however, the MYP of the Echinozoa (Echinoidea + Holothuroidea) is expressed by an unrelated transferrin-like gene that has a reproductive function in both...
Article
1. Increasing sophistication of population viability analysis has broadened our capacity to model population change while accounting for system complexity and uncertainty. However, many emergent properties of population dynamics, such as the coupling of demographic processes with transmission and spread of disease, are still poorly understood. 2. W...
Article
There is growing consensus in the literature on biological invasions that propagule pressure (or a component thereof) is the primary determinant of establishment success in introduced species. However, a recent paper (Moulton et al. Biodiver Conserv 20:607–623, 2011) questions whether this consensus is justified. It argues that the effect of propag...
Article
Full-text available
Australian conservation scientists, managers and decision makers must come to grips with anthropogenic climate change, imposed upon an already variable regional climate system. Pre-and post-instrumental records and climate proxies indicate that Australia has experienced wet and dry cycles over intra-decadal to millennial time scales. Precipitation...
Article
Full-text available
Question: How is maternal investment of energy storage lipids linked to the evolution of development for echinoderms with larval phases? Hypotheses: Egg nutrients sustain development to the exotrophic larval stage in echinoderms with feeding (planktotrophic) larvae and to the exotrophic juvenile stage in species with non-feeding (lecithotrophic) la...