Thomas J. Nyman

Thomas J. Nyman
NYU Shanghai

PhD

About

31
Publications
4,090
Reads
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84
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
84 Citations
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Introduction
My research is focused on legal psychology (LP), human-machine communication (HMC), and artificial intelligence (AI). LP: I focus on the thresholds for when an eyewitness can sufficiently encode the face of a perpetrator in circumstances of increased distance and decreased lighting that allow for a later correct identification. HMC & AI: I focus on how humans engage with and are assisted by AI systems. Also, the use of serious gaming in digital mental health interventions (DMHIs).
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - August 2022
New York University Shanghai
Position
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Practice in Psychology
January 2020 - December 2020
New York University Shanghai
Position
  • Instructor
Education
September 2016 - June 2020
Åbo Akademi University
Field of study
  • Legal Psychology
September 2011 - December 2015
Åbo Akademi University
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2003 - December 2010
Åbo Akademi University
Field of study
  • Philosophy

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Descriptions of perpetrators given by eyewitnesses are important in criminal cases, but the accuracy of eyewitnesses is often low. Research suggests that increased distance lowers accuracy of some descriptions and children and older adults tend to be the least accurate. To investigate the effects of distance and age on descriptive accuracy simultan...
Article
Full-text available
Information on the degree to which individuals can make accurate estimations of someone’s age can be of importance in legal contexts, such as child sexual abuse cases in which the victim is an adolescent. There is, however, a scarcity of studies concerning age estimations conducted with young target persons. Using facial photos of target persons ag...
Preprint
Information on the degree to which individuals can make accurate estimations of someone’s age can be of importance in legal contexts, such as child sexual abuse cases in which the victim is an adolescent. There is, however, a scarcity of studies concerning age estimations conducted with young target persons. Using facial photos of target persons ag...
Article
Full-text available
In eyewitness research the frequent use of video playback presented on a computer screen (i.e., 2D videos) in laboratory-based research is problematic due to the low realism of this method when presenting, for example, threatening (and non-threatening) first-person (and third-person) scenarios. However, in contrast to 2D videos, 360-degree videos p...
Article
Full-text available
It is known that children and older adults produce more false alarms in target absent line-ups and that weaker facial encoding increases choosing bias. However, there has been no investigation of how age or facial encoding strength impacts line-up position selections in either sequential or simultaneous line-ups. In the present study, we presented...
Thesis
Full-text available
(Abbreviated): The four studies included in this thesis are based on two samples with a total of 1766 participants and 7657 line-up decisions in a live ecological setup. To the best of our knowledge, the data collection of Study I represents the largest live eyewitness experiment ever conducted. Our sample is also unique in that it contains an age...
Article
Cognitive mechanisms underlying the limited transfer effects of working memory (WM) training remain poorly understood. We tested in detail the Strategy Mediation hypothesis, according to which WM training generates task-specific strategies that facilitate performance on the trained task and its untrained variants. This large-scale pre-registered ra...
Article
Full-text available
Increased distance between an eyewitness and a culprit decreases the accuracy of eyewitness identifications, but the maximum distance at which reliable observations can still be made is unknown. Our aim was to identify this threshold. We hypothesized that increased distance would decrease identification, rejection accuracy, confidence and would inc...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research shows that increased distance and decreased light result in less correct eyewitness identifications, yet their combined effect is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to establish the maximum distance in low lux (lx) where an eyewitness’s later identification in target present (TP) line-ups is no longer reliable. We...
Preprint
Prior research shows that increased distance and decreased light result in less correct eyewitness identifications, yet their combined effect is unknown. The aim of the present study was to establish the maximum distance in low lux (lx) where an eyewitness’s later identification in target present (TP) line-ups is no longer reliable. We randomized p...
Preprint
Increased distance between an eyewitness and a culprit decreases the accuracy of eyewitness identifications, but the maximum distance at which reliable observations can still be made is unknown. Our aim was to identify this threshold. We hypothesized that increased distance would decrease identification and rejection accuracy, confidence, and incre...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying working memory training remain unclear, but one possibility is that the typically limited transfer effects of this training reflect adoption of successful task-specifc strategies. Our pre-registered randomized controlled trial (N=116) studied the early effects of externally given vs. internally generated strategies in an u...
Article
Full-text available
Research shows that psychological time (i.e., the subjective experience and assessment of the passage of time) is malleable and that the central nervous system re-calibrates temporal information in accordance with situational factors so that psychological time flows slower or faster. Observed motion-speed (e.g., the visual perception of a rolling b...

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