Thomas W Murphy

Thomas W Murphy
Edmonds Community College · Department of Anthropology

PhD Anthropology

About

37
Publications
6,257
Reads
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96
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
58 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. Murphy (PhD, Anthropology, U of Washington, 2003) is Chair of the Department of Anthropology at Edmonds Community College and founder of the Learn and Serve Environmental Anthropology Field (LEAF) School. Awards include Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics in 1993, Lifetime Honorary Triton Outstanding Faculty in 2005, Excellence in Education Award in 2008, Washington State Conservation Educator of the Year in 2011, and KSER Voice of the Community - Community Impact by an Individual in 2014.
Additional affiliations
September 1998 - present
Edmonds Community College
Position
  • Department Chair
September 1998 - present
Edmonds Community College
Position
  • Instructor
Education
September 1994 - June 2003
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
The establishment of protected areas (PAs) is a central strategy for global biodi- versity conservation. While the role of PAs in protecting habitat has been high- lighted, their effectiveness at protecting mammal communities remains unclear. We analyzed a global dataset from over 8671 camera traps in 23 countries on four continents that detected 3...
Article
In two extended Latter-day Saint families, individuals have employed a well-worn settler colonial trope of an Indian princess, as well as a Mormon variation on the legend of Sacagawea, to shape memories about Indigenous women as ancestors. Following larger national trends in the United States and Canada, these Mormons have employed selective memori...
Article
Human activity and land use change impact every landscape on Earth, driving declines in many animal species while benefiting others. Species ecological and life history traits may predict success in human-dominated landscapes such that only species with "winning" combinations of traits will persist in disturbed environments. However, this link betw...
Article
Full-text available
A question posed by a student after a guest lecture about a community-based environmental anthropology field school provoked reflection on community needs in Coast Salish Country. The student expressed an interest in an ethnographic account of field work that had been responsive to community requests. The challenge is that in over two decades of co...
Article
Full-text available
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issued an online statement in February 2012 rejecting all racism, in any form. The statement followed nearly two centuries of tortured struggles with racism promulgated by church leaders, instituted in everyday practices, and integrated into Latter-day Saint scriptures. While rhetoric renouncing racis...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Recovery of the Puget Sound is more than a scientific and technological endeavor. Sustainable solutions require attention to human factors that contributed to the current situation and that may slow or accelerate efforts to achieve a balanced and healthy ecosystem. Various behaviors, structures, processes, and practices in local governments, for ex...
Article
Full-text available
Other Mormon Histories, narratives in which formerly passive objects of history become active subjects, draw attention to the power relationships in the production of Mormon history. The Book of Mormon and traditional Mormon history imagine and then subjugate American Indians as Lamanites in a story of Christian triumphalism. Nahua authors, Margari...
Article
At the request of the City of Mukilteo, students and staff from the Learn and Serve Environmental Anthropology Field (LEAF) School at Edmonds and Everett Community Colleges surveyed Japanese Gulch and Big Gulch for spawning salmon from November 1 through December 15, 2013. The survey demonstrated that adult coho have returned to Japanese Gulch for...
Article
Between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010 the Washington Watershed Education Teacher Training (WWETT) Program, funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Bay Watershed and Training Program, offered sixteen marine-based professional development workshops, an online curriculum development course and support for meaningful wa...
Article
Connect 2 Complete (C2C) is a Campus Compact program with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. At Edmonds Community College C2C employs community-engaged peer advocacy to foster the success and completion of low-income students who need developmental education courses. Our strategy is two-pronged. First, we have supported four facult...
Article
Wildlife constitutes a vital, but often unseen, component of Western Washington ecosystems. Wildlife tracking and motion sensor cameras offer a window into the secretive life of animals as they intersect with our roads and highways. The Learn and Serve Environmental Anthropology Field (LEAF) School at Edmonds Community College, in collaboration wit...
Article
A rapid ethnographic assessment of the septic industry in Snohomish County, Washington reveals that the knowledge of professionals in the field can contribute valuably to a social marketing campaign directed at homeowners. Intensive daily interaction with homeowners gives septic designers, installers and pumpers a front row seat for observing commo...
Article
Wildlife tracking can make an excellent service-learning activity for engaging anthropology, biology and environmental science/studies students in their local communities and ecosystems. This project describes an advanced project for a well-developed field school as well as possible entry-level activities that would be easier to integrate into a wi...
Article
Full-text available
More than 50,000 people annually come to a two-mile long, man-made island in Everett, Washington to relax on sandy beaches, wade in warm and shallow water, join guided nature hikes, watch wildlife, kayak around the perimeter and kite board with steady afternoon winds. Jetty Island is recognized today as one of Snohomish County’s top recreational an...
Article
On August 2, 1990 Iraq invaded Kuwait. In the next month, political discussion centered around how the United States should react to this invasion. Not just political parties or groups of citizens debated about what to do in the face of war, individual families struggled through politics, patriotism, and ideology to deal with the possibility that o...
Article
Full-text available
Common understandings of the Book of Mormon in communities of the Latter-day Saint restoration face a fundamental challenge from emerging biogenetic research. Mormon folklore about skin color, patriarchal seed, and Native American origins naturalizes the power and authority of white men; yet, it is undermined by twentieth century discoveries in the...
Article
This autobiographical account details the author's upbringing in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in southern Idaho and outlines how his encounters with history and science undermined his faith. Dr. Thomas W Murphy presented this story as a keynote speaker at the Help for the Hurting Conference in Keokuk, Iowa in September, 2003, les...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2003 The Book of Mormon, first published by Joseph Smith, Jr. in 1830 in Palmyra, New York, draws upon colonial and antebellum biblical hermeneutics and nineteenth century myths of the origin and fate of an ancient American civilization of Mound Builders to construct a textual image of people of Hebrew des...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic research into Native American and Polynesian origins has provoked controversy within the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Book of Mormon claims that the principal ancestors of the American Indians came from the ancient Middle East, an historical assertion now repudiated by mtDNA evidence. Mormon interpretations of the script...
Article
Full-text available
Based on a decade of field research, this work is the first book-length, scholarly examination in English of the role of Catholicism in Mexican society since the 1970s through 1995, and the increasing political activism of the Catholic church and clergy. It is also the first analysis of church-state relations in Latin America that incorporates deta...
Article
Full-text available
This essay examines the ability of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to attract people of color in Mexico in the early twentieth century despite central teachings that associated a dark skin with a curse from God. Although Mormon theology is imbued with colonial metaphors and racially charged symbolism, the meanings that Mormons apply...
Article
This study examines the interactions between an imported religious health code and local medicinal concepts among members of a Latter-day Sainte congregation in Antigua, Guatemala. It challenges David Martin's assertion that if any of the rapidly growing religious groups originating in North America is engaged in the (North) Americanization of Lati...
Article
Full-text available
Mormonism in Guatemala is being locally reinvented. Cultural translation can be observed through a variety of avenues. One particular example is a public assertion by a Guatemalan Mormon of an ethnic difference with Euro-American Mormons. This claim is examined with insights from anthropological literature on ethnicity. Comparable avowals of ethnic...
Article
Full-text available
In the mid-1930s Mexican Mormons held a series of conventions to express dissatisfaction with estrangement from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah. After the Third Convention many Latter-day Saints in the Central Valley of Mexico separated from the LDS Church and remained independent for nearly a d...
Article
Full-text available
The ability of Latter-day Saint scholars to repeat assertions of a limited geographic setting for the Book of Mormon should not be confused with actual scientific or historical evidence. Claims of a limited geography or local colonization in Mesoamerica do not save the Book of Mormon from genetic evidence. No evidence from molecular anthropology su...
Article
Full-text available
When writing is viewed simply as a source of enlightenment it conceals a network of possibly exploitative social relations. In the case of Mormonism, writing both conceals and shapes social relations. The Book of Mormon was presented by Joseph Smith as a history of the American Indians, a bridge between the historical Judeo-Christian tradition and...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic research into Native American origins was widely hailed as a "Galileo Event" for Mormons. The author examines the origins of this term in Mormon scholarly circles and its adoption and evolution in the media accounts of efforts to excommunicate him for scholarly articles about the implications of DNA research for interpretations of the Book...
Article
Full-text available
The Word of Wisdom, a health code introduced by Joseph Smith in 1833, has a history of varied interpretations within the larger body of Mormon faiths. Among the lesser known of these interpretations is that held by the Peyote Way of Church of God, founded in 1977 by Reverend Immanuel P. Trujillo, Rabbi Matthew S. Kent and Right Sister Anne L. Zapf...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
To monitor a 4'x4' box culvert used in the design of a new road alignment to allow for the passage of wildlife between riparian habitat and wetland mitigation site.. Monitored re-emergence of habitat over five years.