Thomas Claud Michot

Thomas Claud Michot
University of Louisiana at Lafayette | ULL · Institute for Coastal and Water Research

Doctor of Philosophy

About

118
Publications
17,290
Reads
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1,149
Citations
Introduction
Thomas Claud Michot currently is retired from the Institute for Coastal and Water Research, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and from the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (formerly known as National Wetlands Research Center). Thomas does research in Avian Ecology, Marine Biology, Zoology, Coastal Ecology, and Wildlife Management. See https://tcmichot.wixsite.com/tommymichot
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
U.S. Department of the Interior
Position
  • Retired
Description
  • Note: In 2016 the National Wetlands Research Center became the Wetlands and Aquatic Research Center
October 2010 - December 2015
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • In 2015 The Institute for Coastal Ecology and Engineering became the Institute for Coastal and Water Research
October 2010 - December 2022
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Position
  • Graduate Faculty, Adjunct Undergraduate Faculty
Description
  • Courses taught: BIOL 309 - Wildlife Ecology and Management BIOL 312 - Coastal Ecology BIOL 410 – Coastal Community Resilience Studio ENVS 364 – Environmental Field Assessment
Education
September 1976 - December 1981
Louisiana State University
Field of study
  • Zoology and Physiology (Wildlife Management minor)
September 1973 - February 1976
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Science (Botany minor)
August 1968 - August 1972
University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Field of study
  • Zoology, Wildlife Management (Botany minor)

Publications

Publications (118)
Data
The attached two pages are copies of the front and back covers for the RRWW FWCA report (Michot and Hardaway 1982). The cover art was put together by TCM using cut-and-paste technology that was available at the time. Special thanks to Robert W. Strader who had used a similar method in an earlier report from the same office; TCM used Strader’s repor...
Data
Artist Diane Baker created the cover art for this report that was published and distributed by BTNEP. The painting depicts the seaplane (N727) making a low pass over a colony to count roseate spoonbills, snowy egrets, and other wading birds nesting in woody vegetation during this study.
Article
Full-text available
"Cajun Music: A Reflection of a People, Volume II," follows Volume I of the same title published in 1984, also by Ann Allen Savoy. Like its predecessor, Volume II is a substantial work that includes biographical, musical, and discographical information on 38 artists (musicians or groups) and 101 songs by those artists—but covers different artists f...
Preprint
Full-text available
The history of decline of the Ivory-billed Woodpecker is long, complex, and controversial. The last widely accepted sighting of this species in continental North America was 1944. Reports of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers have continued, yet in 2021 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed declaring the species extinct. We draw on 10 years of search e...
Article
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Few photographs exist of living Ivory-billed Woodpeckers (Campephilus principalis), and no previously known photographs show the species foraging. We found a reference in James T. Tanner's field notes to several photographs taken on 23 April 1939 of a group of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers foraging in a recently dead pecan tree (Carya illinoinensis). We...
Article
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Aim Climate change is expected to result in the tropicalization of coastal wetlands in the northern Gulf of Mexico, as warming winters allow tropical mangrove forests to expand their distribution poleward at the expense of temperate salt marshes. Data limitations near mangrove range limits have hindered understanding of the effects of winter temper...
Article
Full-text available
Citation: Day, R.H., Michot, T.S., Twilley, R.M., and From, A.S., 2020, Geographic distribution of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) in coastal Louisiana in 2009: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9RC8EIE. Summary: Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans (L.) L.) has historically occurred along the Louisiana coast in sa...
Chapter
Woodin, M. C. and T. C. Michot (2020). Redhead (Aythya americana), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (A. F. Poole and F. B. Gill, Editors). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA.
Article
Full-text available
• Understanding how introduced species succeed and become widely distributed within non‐native areas is critical to reduce the threats posed by them. Our goal was to reconstruct the main invasion routes and invasion dynamics of a global freshwater invader, the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, through the analysis of its genetic variability...
Article
While it has been well established that waterfowl can sometimes control the distribution and abundance of seagrasses, relatively little is known about their effects in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM). Seagrass meadows provide critical habitat for commercially important finfish and shellfish and as winter waters continue to warm, the nGOM will li...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses are submerged marine plants that are anchored to the substrate and are therefore limited to assimilating nutrients from the surrounding water column or sediment, or by translocating nutrients from adjacent shoots through the belowground rhizome. As a result, seagrasses have been used as reliable ecosystem indicators of surrounding nutrie...
Article
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We determined the interactive effects of nutrient loading and salinity pulsing on Vallisneria americana Michx., the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation species in the lower St Johns River (LSJR), FL, USA, and its associated algal community. Five hundred and ninety 6-inch diameter intact plant plugs of Vallisneria were collected from the LSJR in M...
Article
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Anthropogenic disturbances in wetland ecosystems can alter the composition and structure of plant assemblages and affect system functions. Extensive oil and gas extraction has occurred in wetland habitats along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast since the early 1900s. Activities involved with three-dimensional (3D) seismic exploration for these reso...
Conference Paper
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The Professional sphere, although adapting, is still not structured to address these issues across disciplines. The Academic sphere, where we both conduct research and educate the future professionals, is even less adept at crossing disciplines. This paper discusses and critiques a new transdisciplinary initiative that seeks to better understand th...
Article
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Abstract Migratory birds are often suggested to be important vectors for long-distance dispersal (LDD) of plant and animal propagules. The scale of such dispersal events (hundreds to thousands of kilometers) can influence landscape-level biological processes and species distributions. However, the few vector species studied and the lack of proper i...
Article
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Given their abundance and migratory behavior, waterbirds have major potential for dispersing plants and invertebrates within North America, yet their role as vectors remains poorly understood. We investigated the numbers and types of invertebrates and seeds within freshly collected faecal samples (n=22) of migratory dabbling ducks and shorebirds in...
Article
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Long distance dispersal (LDD) of propagules is an important determinant of population dynamics, community structuring and biodiversity distribution at landscape, and sometimes continental, scale. Although migratory animals are potential LDD vectors, migratory movement data have never been integrated in estimates of propagule dispersal distances and...
Article
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We report the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) in Spartina alterniflora Loisel roots. Roots were sampled for AM in field-collected and greenhouse-maintained Spartina patens (Aiton) Muhl. and S. alterniflora, the dominant species of Louisiana’s brackish and saline marshes, respectively. Previous reports of AM association in these Spartina sp....
Technical Report
Full-text available
ABSTRACT – All known existing published and unpublished data on seabird colonies from Louisiana during the years 1976 to 2012 were assembled and put into a Geographical Information System. The data were then synthesized and restructured so that the history of each individual colony could be displayed in tabular form. In addition, data were summariz...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Shifts in plant community composition and structure can affect the quality of habitat for wildlife species. Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Louisiana was established in 1937 with a primary goal of providing habitat for wintering waterfowl species. A large freshwater impoundment constructed on the refuge to improve waterfowl habit...
Article
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Aerial surveys are often used to quantify sizes of waterbird colonies; however, these surveys would benefit from a better understanding of associated biases. We compared estimates of breeding pairs of waterbirds, in colonies across southern Louisiana, USA, made from the ground, fixed-wing aircraft, and a helicopter. We used a marked-subsample metho...
Article
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Rising sea level poses critical ecological and economical consequences for the low-lying megadeltas of the world where dependent populations and agriculture are at risk. The Mekong Delta of Vietnam is one of many deltas that are especially vulnerable because much of the land surface is below mean sea level and because there is a lack of coasta...
Article
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Black mangrove (Avicennia germinans), a subtropical species, has historically occurred in saline marsh habitat along the Louisiana coast, but their distribution has always been sparse and they seldom achieved heights of greater than 1 m. The distribution of black mangrove in Louisiana has been largely limited by freezing temperatures. Weather recor...
Article
Full-text available
Accelerated eutrophication is common to many freshwater and marine environments and often co-occurs with the presence of anthropogenic chemicals. However, the toxic effects of common chemical stressors such as herbicides in the presence of elevated nutrients are not well understood for most aquatic flora, particularly vascular species. To provide i...
Article
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Waterfowl management on breeding grounds focuses on improving nest success, but few studies have compared waterfowl nest success and factors affecting nest survival along a wetland gradient and simultaneously identified nest predators. We monitored nests (n = 195) of common pochards (Aythya ferina) in Trebon Basin Biosphere Reserve, Czech Republic,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Currently, there are no known Ivory-billed Woodpecker activity areas that can be carefully delineated and studied to determine habitat relations. Research conducted on the last known populations by James Tanner (Singer Tract, Louisiana: 1930s) and George Lamb (Cuba; 1950s), have provided known historical locations of Ivory-billed Woodpecker habitat...
Data
Full-text available
Baldwin, H.Q., W.C. Barrow, Jr., C.J. Wells, J.B. Grace, T.C. Michot, L.R. Handley, T.L. Hatch, and J. Dugas. 2009. Habitat relations of the ivory-billed woodpecker on the Singer Tract, Louisiana: a retrospective analysis. Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting, Madison, Wisconsin, June 22-26, 2009.
Article
Full-text available
A mesocosm study was conducted to determine the effects of variable salinity and light on Vallisneria americana Michx. (wild celery) and associated algal community components in the lower St. Johns River, Florida. Fifteen centimeter diameter intact plant plugs were collected from the LSJR in March 2001 and transported to mesocosm facilities in Lafa...
Article
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Understanding the consequences of hurricanes on the food resources available to neotropicalnearctic migrant songbirds may provide important insight into the effects of hurricanes on migratory populations. During autumn migration 2006 we investigated the foraging ecology of two species of insectivorous migrants, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila cae...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Currently, there are no known Ivory-billed Woodpecker activity areas that can be carefully delineated and studied to determine habitat relations. Work conducted on the last known populations by James Tanner (Singer Tract, Louisiana; 1930s) and George Lamb (Cuba; 1950’s), have provided thirteen known locations of Ivory-billed Woodpecker home ranges....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Ivory-billed Woodpecker, long suspected to be extinct, is now known to persist in remnant lowlands of the Cache River, Arkansas. Planning efforts are underway for extensive searches to find more birds in Arkansas and other river bottoms of the southern United States. Anecdotal reports of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers in the southern United States co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This is a bundled project including a primary study of attack rates of Cerambycid beetles and other wood boring insects as potential prey organisms of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers, with a growing number of collateral projects made possible by the initial design. The primary study addresses the concern that food availability is a likely limiting factor...
Article
Full-text available
Diets of wintering redheads (Aythya americana) have been studied in the past, but none of the previous studies compared diets of the upper gastrointestinal tract to determine if they differed due to sex, age, location, year, or time of year. We compared diets of redheads collected over seagrass beds at Chandeleur Sound, Louisiana (n = 287) and Lagu...
Article
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Redheads (Aythya americana) migrate annually from their breeding range in the interior of North America to winter along the coasts of the United States and Mexico. Two of the most important areas where redheads traditionally concentrate in winter are the Laguna Madre and nearby bays in southern Texas and the Chandeleur Sound in southeastern Louisia...
Article
Full-text available
Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana on August 29, 2005, and Hurricane Rita made landfall in southwest Louisiana on September 24, 2005. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) flew aerial surveys to assess damages to natural resources and to lands owned and managed by the U.S. Department of the Interior and other agencie...
Article
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Hurricane Rita significantly impacted the chenier forests of southwestern Louisiana, an important habitat for Neotropical migratory birds. Sediment deposition was measured along transects at Hackberry Beach chenier, and Rita's effects on chenier structure and morphology were determined.
Article
Full-text available
Redheads, Aythya americana, concentrate in large numbers annually in traditional wintering areas along the western and northern rim of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of these areas are the Laguna Madre of Texas and Chandeleur Sound of Louisiana. We collected data on 54,340 activities from 103 redhead flocks in Texas and 51,650 activities from 57 redhead f...
Article
Full-text available
Diurnal time-activity budgets were determined for wintering redheads (Aythya americana) from estuarine seagrass beds in Louisiana (Chandeleur Sound) and Texas (Laguna Madre) and from ponds adjacent to the Laguna Madre. Activities differed (p<0.0001) by location, month, and diurnal time period. Resting and feeding were the most frequent activities o...
Article
Full-text available
Diurnal time-activity budgets were determined for wintering redheads (Aythya americana) from estuarine seagrass beds in Louisiana (Chandeleur Sound) and Texas (Laguna Madre) and from ponds adjacent to the Laguna Madre. Activities differed (p<0.0001) by location, month, and diurnal time period. Resting and feeding were the most frequent activities o...
Article
Full-text available
Redheads, Aythya americana, concentrate in large numbers annually in traditional wintering areas along the western and northern rim of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of these areas are the Laguna Madre of Texas and Chandeleur Sound of Louisiana. We collected data on 54,340 activities from 103 redhead flocks in Texas and 51,650 activities from 57 redhead f...
Article
Full-text available
We found SAV was generally more abundant in areas managed with an unusual combination of a water control structure that allows drawdown but without levees that prevent over marsh water exchange, than in unmanaged areas. Although SAV was generally more abundant in managed than in unmanaged areas, the effect varied among areas and over time. Manageme...
Article
Full-text available
Waterfowl often have been assumed to disperse freshwater aquatic organisms between isolated wetlands, but no one has analyzed the impact of this transport on the population structure of aquatic organisms. For three cladocerans (Daphnia ambigua, Daphnia laevis, and Sida crystallina) and one bryozoan (Cristatella mucedo), we estimated the genetic dis...
Article
Full-text available
Waterfowl often have been assumed to disperse freshwater aquatic organisms between isolated wetlands, but no one has analyzed the impact of this transport on the population structure of aquatic organisms. For three cladocerans (Daphnia ambigua, Daphnia laevis, and Sida crystallina) and one bryozoan (Cristatella mucedo), we estimated the genetic dis...
Article
Full-text available
: Waterfowl often have been assumed to disperse fresh-water aquatic organisms between isolated wetlands, but no one has analyzed the impact of this transport on the population structure of aquatic organisms. For three cladocerans (Daphnia ambigua, Daphnia laevis, and Sida crystallina) and one bryozoan (Cristatella mucedo), we estimated the genetic...
Article
Full-text available
It is not known whether en route fall migratory birds (August-October) are likely to suffer more from direct or secondary effects of hurricanes. On September 24, 2005, Hurricane Rita wreaked havoc on Louisiana's coast by toppling trees over vast areas and by stripping away microhabitats that harbor the invertebrates and produce the fruits upon whic...
Chapter
Full-text available
Redhead Aythya americana Fuligula americana Eyton, 1838, Monogr. Anatidae, p. 155 North America Etymology:‘of America’. Other names: French:Canard Tête-rouge,Milouin Tête-rouge, Canard Violon (south Louisiana, Canada); French: Milouin Americain (Europe); German: Rotkopfente; Spanish: Pato cabeza roja, Guayareja, Cabeza colorado (Mexico). Variation:...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We established five pairs of study sites in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, to investigate a dieback of Spartina alterniflora Loisel (smooth cordgrass) marsh. The dieback was first observed in May 2000. We established two sites in 2000 and three in 2001. Each study site pair consisted of a Dead site (impacted by the dieback) and an adjacent Live site...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We conducted monthly or bimonthly aerial surveys to track the extent of coastal marsh dieback in Louisiana from June 2000 to August 2002; we conducted a follow-up survey in June 2003. We estimated the total affected area in the Deltaic Plain (southeast Louisiana) to have been about 35,000 acres in June 2000, at the start of the dieback. The dieback...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Catahoula Lake is the largest natural freshwater lake in Louisiana, covering more than 46 square miles (120 km2) at peak capacity. The lake is a principal stopover and wintering site for hundreds of thousands of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds. Scientists from the USGS National Wetlands Research Center were approached by Louisiana Department of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
ABSTRACT We surveyed all known waterbird nesting colonies (locations from surveys conducted in 1976, 1978, 1983, 1990, and 1991-1999), and all areas en route between known locations (5,908 km), in south Louisiana during April, May, and June 2001. We conducted the surveys from fixed-winged amphibious aircraft configured to collect GIS-ready spatial...
Article
Full-text available
Videography is an effective tool for cataloging forest damage caused by wide area impacts of large scale disturbances such as hurricanes. Where ground accessibility is hampered by damage to social infrastructure and downed trees following hurricane disasters, aerial observations are an efficient and comprehensive means to achieve regional assessmen...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Doyle, T. W., T. C. Michot and C. J. Wells. 2002. Mapping and modeling the bathymetry of Catahoula Lake, Louisiana for wetland and waterfowl management. USGS Fact Sheet FS-098-02.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Doyle, T. W., T. C. Michot, R. Day, and C. Wells. 2002. History and ecology of mangroves in the Dry Tortugas. USGS Fact Sheet FS-047-02.
Article
Full-text available
Aerial surveys of American White Pelicans ( Pelecanus erythrorhynchos ) were conducted over coastal Louisiana and the delta region of Mississippi on 1-2 days during December, February, and April each year from 1997 to 1999. Additional surveys were conducted in coastal Texas and Mexico during January 1998 and 1999. The numbers, location, and habitat...