Thomas Luypaert

Thomas Luypaert
Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) · Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management (INA)

Master of Science in Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems
Doctoral candidate at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences

About

3
Publications
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37
Citations

Publications

Publications (3)
Article
Soundscape studies are increasingly used to capture landscape‐scale ecological patterns. Yet, several aspects of soundscape diversity remain unexplored. Although some processes influencing acoustic niche usage may operate in the 24‐hour temporal domain, most acoustic indices only capture the diversity of sounds co‐occurring in sound files at a spec...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Soundscape studies are increasingly common to capture landscape-scale ecological patterns. Yet, several aspects of soundscape diversity quantification remain unexplored. Although some processes influencing acoustic niche usage may operate in the 24h domain, most acoustic indices only capture the diversity of sounds co-occurring in sound files at...
Chapter
Full-text available
Marine biodiversity plays an important role in providing the ecosystem functions and services which humans derive from the oceans. Understanding how this provisioning will change in the Anthropocene requires knowledge of marine biodiversity patterns. Here, we review the status of marine species diversity in space and time. Knowledge of marine speci...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Hi all,
I'm currently working on a soundscape ecology study in which the entire acoustic community is of interest. I have been reading up about the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), and the trade-off between the time and frequency resolution, which is determined by the choice of window length.
I have however failed to find any resources which explain which temporal/frequency resolution is required for the sounds of interest.
I understand that if only one/a few species with known vocalizations are of interest, this choice can be justified easily, but what if you're dealing with an unknown acoustic community? Studies of the acoustic community which use only the audible spectrum (with a sampling rate of 44.1 kHz) often use a frequency resolution of 172 Hz, but don't offer a justification why they chose this. And what if you're also looking at the ultrasonic part of the acoustic community - how would the required frequency resolution change to capture both sonic and ultrasonic signals?
I appreciate any insights you might have.
Question
In the past years, I've been doing a lot of camera trapping in rainforests, and there is recurring issue I've been having for a while: daytime IR images. 
As the rainforest understory tends to be low-light environment, all camera trap models I've used (Reconyx Hyperfire HC500 and Browning Dark Ops Pro) often switch automatically to the IR flash mode, even during the daytime. Since color is an important attribute for the differentiation of otherwise similar species, I find this problematic. Is anyone else having the same problem, and if so, have you found a way around it?
I was wondering whether it would be possible to change the light threshold at which the camera decides to switch to infrared. Browning addresses this issue on their webpage (https://browningtrailcameras.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360009748473-...), but does not provide any solutions. 
All insights are welcome :). 
Cheers,  Thomas

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