Thomas Kantermann

Thomas Kantermann
FOM Hochschule für Oekonomie & Management gGmbH | FOM · Institut für Arbeit & Personal (iap)

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Dr. habil. med.

About

64
Publications
34,012
Reads
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3,256
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - January 2022
FOM Hochschule für Oekonomie & Management gGmbH
Position
  • Wissenschaftlicher Direktor
September 2017 - present
June 2016 - present
SynOpus
Position
  • Freelancer
Description
  • Research and consultancy on human sleep, health, performance and light
Education
January 2009 - June 2016
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Field of study
  • Medical Psychology
December 2005 - December 2008
October 1998 - June 2003
Bielefeld University
Field of study
  • Neuroanatomy and Psychology

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Der soziotechnische Wandel hin zur Durchdringung der Arbeitswelt mit immer mehr digitalen Geräten verläuft schleichend. Eine mögliche Folge ist eine Entstrukturierung des Alltags, wodurch die innere Uhr aus dem Takt geraten kann. Erholsamer Schlaf ist untrennbar mit der inneren Uhr verbunden und maßgeblich am Wohlbefinden beteiligt. Bei der Entwick...
Article
Full-text available
To examine the effect of night shift on salivary cortisol at awakening (C1), 30 min later (C2), and on the cortisol awakening response (CAR, the difference between C2 and C1). We compared shift and non-shift workers with a focus on the impact of worker chronotype. Our study included 66 shift-working females (mean age = 37.3 years, SD = 10.2) and 21...
Book
Full-text available
Der Band „Research Network International: Von Wissenschaft, Vernetzung und Emotionen“ berichtet über das Projekt RNI, insbesondere über die Einbindung der Studierenden aus dem Gesundheitsbereich in die internationale Forschung an der FOM. Zudem wird der Ausbau der Internationalisierungsstrategie der Hochschule sowie die nachhaltige Verankerung des...
Article
Full-text available
Available evidence on the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the days after the spring daylight saving time (DST) transition suggests either a modest increase or no risk increase. Partial sleep deprivation and enhanced circadian clock misalignment have been implicated as the underlying mechanisms for increased AMI risk, probably via enhan...
Chapter
Gesundheit und sicheres Arbeiten sind im Schichtbetrieb in besonderem Maße strapaziert, mit Konsequenzen für sowohl Schichtarbeiter selbst wie auch für diejenigen, die davon abhängig sind, dass Schichtarbeiter ihre Arbeit verlässlich erfüllen (z.B. im Flugverkehr, Operationsaal, bei Notfalleinsätzen). Ein Grundproblem für diese Strapazen ist eine S...
Article
In dem Artikel „Virtuelle Hürden nehmen – wissenschaftlicher Diskurs im Studium“ werden die gewonnenen Erkenntnisse der 1. RNI Master Days, welche erfolgreich im Januar 2021 am Institut für Gesundheit & Soziales der FOM Hochschule, in Kooperation mit der FH Joanneum, durchgeführt worden sind, präsentiert. Der Fokus des Artikels liegt auf der Vorber...
Book
Full-text available
Das Arbeitspapier „Integration von berufsbegleitend Studierenden in die Forschung - Evaluation des digitalen Master-Forschungsforums 2020 der FOM Hochschule“ stellt die Evaluationsergebnisse des bundesweiten digitalen Master-Forschungsforum 2020 der FOM Hochschule für Oekonomie & Management vor. Der Bericht zeigt eine positive Bewertung der Veranst...
Article
Two new studies show that the social lockdown imposed as a result of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has helped unlock more time for sleep. Although daily stress during the lockdown increased, and sleep quality decreased, sleep behaviour was generally healthier.
Preprint
The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic related social lockdown has helped unlock time to give more room to sleep. Although daily stress during lockdown increased, and sleep quality decreased, sleep behaviour was generally healthier, as two novel research papers show.
Article
Full-text available
Daylight stems solely from direct, scattered and reflected sunlight, and undergoes dynamic changes in irradiance and spectral power composition due to latitude, time of day, time of year and the nature of the physical environment (reflections, buildings and vegetation). Humans and their ancestors evolved under these natural day/night cycles over mi...
Article
Full-text available
Annual rhythms in humans have been described for a limited num- ber of behavioral and physiological parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate time-of-year variations in late arrivals, sick leaves, dismissals from class (attendance), and grades (performance). Data were collected in Dutch high school students across 4 academic years (indic...
Article
Full-text available
Light is necessary for vision; it enables us to sense and perceive our surroundings and in many direct and indirect ways, via eye and skin, affects our physiological and psychological health. The use of light in built environments has comfort, behavioural, economic and environmental consequences. Daylight has many particular benefits including exce...
Article
Full-text available
Background: We compared psychomotor vigilance in female shift workers of the Bergmannsheil University Hospital in Bochum, Germany (N = 74, 94% nurses) after day and night shifts. Methods: Participants performed a 3-minute Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) test bout at the end of two consecutive day and three consecutive night shifts, respectively...
Article
Sleep duration and food intake are interconnected and important for health. New research shows that reducing sleep across five nights leads to more snacking after dinner and metabolic disturbances, which ad libitum weekend sleep could only partially compensate for.
Article
Full-text available
There is no standard definition of shift work universally, and no validated reports of complete biological adjustment to shift work in workers. Similarly, the evidence for shift work tolerance is limited due to a small number of studies and a narrow range of outcome measures This paper discusses evidence to date regarding individual differences in...
Article
The timing of sleep is under the control of the circadian clock, which uses light to entrain to the external light‐dark cycle. A combination of genetic, physiological and environmental factors produces individual differences in chronotype (entrained phase as manifest in sleep timing). A mismatch between circadian and societal (e.g. work) clocks lea...
Article
Full-text available
Night shift work can have a serious impact on health. Here, we assess whether and how night shift work influences the metabolite profiles, specifically with respect to different chronotype classes. We have recruited 100 women including 68 nurses working both, day shift and night shifts for up to 5 consecutive days and collected 3640 spontaneous uri...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Sleep is essential for health and performance and its timing and consolidation are regulated by the biological clock. There is a rich variety in sleep timing (chronotype) that is often disregarded by society when imposing uniform school/working starting times. This has consequences, for instance, for school performance. Previous stud...
Article
Full-text available
The Working Time Society (WTS), and the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Scientific Committee on Shiftwork and Working Time, are twin organisations focused on conducting research, and informing practice, regarding the impact of work hours in general, and shiftwork in particular, on the efficiency, productivity, safety, well-be...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we review how light affects humans: first by describing the ways in which light impacts physiology and behavior, and then by discussing how different char- acteristics of light (timing, pattern, intensity, duration, and past light exposure) can influence alertness, cognitive performance, mood, sleep, and well-being, in addition to...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we review how light affects humans: first by describing the ways in which light impacts physiology and behavior, and then by discussing how different char- acteristics of light (timing, pattern, intensity, duration, and past light exposure) can influence alertness, cognitive performance, mood, sleep, and well-being, in addition to...
Article
The timing of the circadian clock, circadian period and chronotype varies among individuals. To date, not much is known about how these parameters vary over time in an individual. We performed an analysis of the following five common circadian clock and chronotype measures: 1) the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO, a measure of circadian phase), 2) p...
Article
Assessments of circadian phase using melatonin are laborious. Sleep-time indices allow for less laborious phase calculations, but common indices weakly represent melatonin phase. We show how a single sleep-time assessment can represent melatonin phase by over 60%, improving the use of subjective sleep to mirror objective circadian phase.
Article
Full-text available
Success at school determines future career opportunities. We described a time-of-day specific disparity in school performance between early and late chronotypes. Several studies showed that students with a late chronotype and short sleep duration obtain lower grades, suggesting that early school starting times handicap their performance. How chrono...
Article
Full-text available
Presentation
Full-text available
TEDx Groningen - One of the most beautiful and bizarre days of my life ... thanks TEDx! http://tedxgroningen.com/tedxgroningen2016/thomas-kantermann/
Article
The dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is the most reliable measure of central circadian timing in humans. However, it is not always possible to measure the DLMO because sample collection has to occur in the hours before usual sleep onset, it requires staff support and considerable participant effort, and it is relatively expensive. Questionnaires th...
Article
The objectives of this study were to (1) examine whether need for recovery differs between workers (i) not on-call, (ii) on-call but not called and (iii) on-call and called, and (2) investigate the associations between age, health, work and social characteristics with need for recovery for the three scenarios (i-iii). Cross-sectional data of N = 16...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Previous qualitative research has revealed that people with fibromyalgia use daytime napping as a coping strategy for managing symptoms against clinical advice. Yet there is no evidence to suggest whether daytime napping is beneficial or detrimental for people with fibromyalgia. The purpose of this study is to explore how people use day...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to elucidate associations between stroke onset and severity as well as chronotype (phase of entrainment) and internal time of stroke. Fifty-six first-ever ischemic stroke patients participated in a cross-sectional study assessing chronotype (mid-sleep on work-free days corrected for sleep deficit on workdays; MSFsc) by applying the...
Article
Full-text available
Circadian clocks of adolescents typically run late – including sleep times – while adolescents generally are expected at school early in the morning. Due to this mismatch between internal (circadian) and external (social) times, they suffer from chronic sleep deficiency, which, in turn, affects academic performance negatively. This constellation im...
Conference Paper
We present an approach to estimate a persons light exposure using smartphones. We used web-sourced weather reports combined with smartphone light sensor data, time of day, and indoor/outdoor information, to estimate illuminance around the user throughout a day. Since light dominates every human's circadian rhythm and influences the sleep-wake cycle...
Article
The aim of this pilot study was to explore the risk of metabolic abnormalities in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations. Male workers in a steel factory [16 employed in a fast clockwise rotation (CW), 18 in slow counterclockwise rotation (CC), 9 day workers (DW); mean age 43.3 ± SD 6.8 years] with at least 5 years experience in t...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about human entrainment under natural conditions, partly due to the complexity of human behavior, torn between biological and social time and influenced by zeitgebers (light-dark cycles) that are progressively "polluted" (and thereby weakened) by artificial light. In addition, data about seasonal variations in sleep parameters are s...
Article
The current study investigated the accident rates across morning, late, and night shifts in rotating shift-workers employed in two different shift rotations at the same steel work factory. A retrospective analysis has been performed of accident data (N = 578) over a 5-year period (2003 through 2007) of 730 male shift-workers employed in either a cl...
Article
This analysis assessed whether seasonal change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was associated with bone resorption, as evidenced by serum parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide concentrations. The main finding was that increased seasonal fluctuation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with increased levels of parathyroid hormone and...
Article
Light and darkness are the main time cues synchronising all biological clocks to the external environment. This little understood evolutionary phenomenon is called circadian entrainment. A new study illuminates our understanding of how modern light- and lifestyles compromise circadian entrainment and impact our biological clocks.
Article
Full-text available
The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light–dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the field’s pioneers, and the astonishing finding that...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The aim of this study was to identify atherosclerotic risk using pulse wave velocity (PWV) in steel workers employed in different shift-work rotations, and to elucidate its relationship to social jetlag and shift schedule details. Participants: Male workers in a steel factory (n=77, 32 fast clockwise (CW), 30 slow counterclockwise (CC...
Chapter
Working around the clock is common for many occupations, as diverse as nurses, truck drivers, physicians, steel workers, and pilots. Each shift-work profession is individual in more aspects than just work hours and individual work scenarios, each posing a different impact on the health of workers. Related health problems in shift workers, therefore...
Conference Paper
1Charite´ University Hospitals, Berlin, DE, 2CBMT, Charleroi, BE, 3ArcelorMittal Industeel Belgium, Charleroi, BE, 4University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, 5Free University of Brussels, Charleroi, BE, 6University of Basel, Basel, CH Objective: Pulse wave velocity (PWV; a marker for atherosclerotic risk), glucose, insulin and social jetlag (difference...
Article
Working around the clock is common for many occupations, as diverse as nurses, truck drivers, physicians, steel workers, and pilots. Each shift-work profession is individual in more aspects than just work hours and individual work scenarios, each posing a different impact on the health of workers. Related health problems in shift-workers, therefore...
Article
Full-text available
The human circadian clock regulates the daily timing of sleep, alertness and performance and is synchronized to the 24-h day by the environmental light-dark cycle. Bright light exposure has been shown to positively affect sleepiness and alertness, yet little is known about its effects on physical performance, especially in relation to chronotype. W...
Article
Sleep has strong links to the symptomology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), a diffuse musculoskeletal pain disorder. Information about the involvement of the circadian clock is, however, sparse. In this study, 1548 individuals with FMS completed an online survey containing questions on demographics, stimulant consumption, sleep quality, well-being a...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to analyze individual cortisol levels in relation to work conditions, sleep, and health parameters among truck drivers working day shifts (n=21) compared to those working irregular shifts (n=21). A total of 42 male truck drivers (39.8±6.2 yrs) completed questionnaires about sociodemographics, job content, work environment, health,...
Article
Shift-work seriously affects the health and well-being of millions of people worldwide, and the number of shift workers is constantly rising (currently approximately 20% of the workforce). While some effects are acute, others lead to chronic syndromes that persist after retirement. Though health problems in shift workers are well established, we st...
Article
In 2007, the IARC (WHO) has classified "shift-work that involves circadian disruption" as potentially carcinogenic. Ample evidence leaves no doubt that shift-work is detrimental for health, but the mechanisms behind this effect are not well understood. The hormone melatonin is often considered to be a causal link between night shift and tumor devel...
Article
Humans show large inter-individual differences in organising their behaviour within the 24-h day-this is most obvious in their preferred timing of sleep and wakefulness. Sleep and wake times show a near-Gaussian distribution in a given population, with extreme early types waking up when extreme late types fall asleep. This distribution is predomina...
Article
A quarter of the world's population is subjected to a 1 hr time change twice a year (daylight saving time, DST). This reflects a change in social clocks, not environmental ones (e.g., dawn). The impact of DST is poorly understood. Circadian clocks use daylight to synchronize (entrain) to the organism's environment. Entrainment is so exact that huma...
Data
Humans show large inter-individual differences in organising their behaviour within the 24-h day—this is most obvious in their preferred timing of sleep and wakefulness. Sleep and wake times show a near-Gaussian distribution in a given population, with extreme early types waking up when extreme late types fall asleep. This distribution is predomina...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
1) Understanding the influence of chronotype and sleep on school performance and attendance 2) Understanding the influence of school starting times on sleep and school performance