Thomas Jusselme

Thomas Jusselme
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland · Energy — Institut de recherche appliquée en systèmes énergétiques

Professor

About

53
Publications
8,657
Reads
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476
Citations
Citations since 2017
39 Research Items
474 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
The building stock is responsible for 24% of carbon emissions in Switzerland and 44% of the final energy use. Considering that most of the existing stock will still be in place in 2050, it becomes essential to better understand this source of emissions. Although the Swiss Cantonal Energy Certificate for Buildings (CECB) database has been used in pr...
Article
Full-text available
Challenging climate goals demand immediate greenhouse gas emissions reductions for long-term temperature stabilization. Given the nearly linear relationship between warming and cumulative net emissions, the carbon budget approach is a useful tool to quantify remaining carbon allowances for countries, sectors, and even buildings. The built environme...
Article
Full-text available
The building sector consumes about one-third of total final energy and contributes to 38% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions around the world. Thus, the EU has established a set of directives that includes the EPBD and the EED to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. Hence, France adopted more challenging legislation by introducing the new environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
Stringent limits and reduction strategies paths on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are being defined at different levels for long-term temperature stabilization. Given the nearly linear relationship between warming and cumulative net emissions, a carbon budget approach is required to limit global warming, as stated by the IPCC. In this setting, the...
Article
Full-text available
To tackle the problem of climate change, Swiss energy strategies aim to reach the carbon neutrality by 2050. However, this challenge cannot simply be solved by focusing on the operational energy performance and instead, on a lifecycle evaluation. Thus, in order to reduce the sector’s carbon footprint, building stakeholders need to consider embodied...
Article
Full-text available
In order to limit global warming, remaining carbon budgets have been defined by the IPCC in 2018. In this context translating global goals to local realities implicates a set of different challenges. Standardized methodologies of allocation can support a target-cascading process. On the other hand, local strategies and norms are not currently desig...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The impact of daylighting strategies on a building’s carbon emissions have so far been assessed mostly based on the building’s use phase and their resulting operational benefits, overlooking embodied carbon emissions of material production, construction, maintenance and end of life. This paper proposes a new methodological framework that combines d...
Article
Full-text available
Target values for creating carbon budgets for buildings are important for developing climate-neutral building stocks. A lack of clarity currently exists for defining carbon budgets for buildings and what constitutes a unit of assessment—particularly the distinction between production- and consumption-based accounting. These different perspectives o...
Article
Generally, the environmental impacts of buildings are benchmarked per square meter as a functional unit. However, this practice prevents developing a user-centered approach in which performance is linked to real usage and not building size. Currently, the less a building is used, the lower the energy consumed during its use and, consequently, the i...
Article
Recognized as a powerful methodology for the evaluation of environmental burdens, life cycle assessment (LCA) must be performed with close-to-reality inputs to be robust and accurate. However, the necessary real-world data is hardly available at the design stage, resulting in current LCA practice being mainly based on standards and norms as hypothe...
Article
The international greenhouse gas agreements call for mitigations in the building industry. Thus, the number of scientific publications about life-cycle performance assessment (LCPA) follows an exponential trend since the 2000s. However, previous surveys highlighted that the use of these methods is still not a common practice. Hence, it is of primar...
Article
Environmental performance objectives in terms of energy consumption and carbon emission targets can be found in various building norms and certifications schemes. These targets are often dependent upon the building program (e.g. office), but independent from its context; the same value is imposed for two buildings of the same program regardless of...
Article
Full-text available
While ambitious environmental objectives are being set for new constructions in Switzerland, the assessment of urban-scale projects and comparison of their performance to national targets are made possible by a growing number of life-cycle assessment (LCA) tools. However, previous research emphasizes the lack of existing tools to support the decisi...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental performance assessment of the built environment tends to focus mostly on operational final energy consumption of buildings located within a specific context. Such a limited scope prevents broader usability of findings in practice. In Switzerland, the ‘2000-W society’ vision provides a theoretical framework towards energy transition. I...
Chapter
This chapter aims to summarize key findings in the form of operational recommendations in order to encourage professionals in the construction business to develop comfortable, low-carbon buildings. The key drivers of a living lab research process are also highlighted to help those who are or will be involved in a living lab to improve its usability...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The built environment is facing environmental regulations more ambitious than ever before. In Europe, a law will lead all new buildings to the Nearly Zero-Energy performance level. However, even if a building does not have any energy consumption for its operation phase, it still has embodied impacts. To that end, Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) methods...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Coupling photovoltaic (PV) systems with energy storage (ES) in buildings, enables to increase the building's energy autonomy and the self-consumption of onsite renewables. ES increases nonetheless the life cycle environmental impact of the stored energy. As such, there exists a threshold where the GHG emission benefits of using ES start to compensa...
Article
Full-text available
The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Temporal variations in the primary energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of the electricity provided to the Swiss grid” Vuarnoz and Jusselme (2018). The provided data are the hourly CO2-eq emission factors, and the hourly conversion factors for the cumulative energy...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A variety of building labels and norms exist that set evermore-ambitious environmental and energy performance targets. In parallel, a growing number of building performance evaluation tools are adopting the life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to allow verifying if a project, based on its detailed description, reaches these targets. However, suc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Due to climate change, the built environment is facing increasingly strict environmental targets. Thus, architects are challenged to design evermore high-performing buildings, a task for which they can no longer depend solely on their experience and intuition. Building performance simulation (BPS) tools have become central in this context to suppor...
Article
Exploration methods combine parametric energy assessments and data visualization to support building designers at early design stages. When exploration methods come to Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) and the Global Warming Potential (GWP) assessment, a larger number of input parameters induces a very high computation load. Previous researches suggested...
Article
Huge amount of energy resources greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is devoted to the built environment. Therefore, an accurate assessment method of these indicators is compulsory. To take advantage of the temporal variation in the primary energy use and associated GHG emissions of the energy supply, we propose two ways of integrating hourly life-cycle...
Article
It is a frequent practice nowadays to use mean annual conversion factors (CFs) when performing life-cycle assessment (LCA) of processes and products that use electricity supplied by the grid. In this paper, we conduct an hourly assessment of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factor, along with the conversion factors for the cumulative energy demand...
Article
Full-text available
Free cooling strategies are gaining importance in design practice due to the increased risk of overheating in well-insulated buildings with high internal loads such as offices. The state of the art highlights that the most efficient passive solution for indoor temperature stabilization and control is the integration of thermal mass with an optimize...
Article
Building envelope design has gained importance as a means to reduce heating and cooling demand related to a building’s operational phase. However, in high internal load buildings, such as offices, internal gains can easily lead to overheating. Thermal inertia (TI) and night ventilation have a great potential for reducing heat loads and temperature....
Article
The built environment is one of the major contributors of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To tackle climate change, global targets have been set for this sector. Although life-cycle assessment (LCA) methods are typically used to evaluate a building project's embodied energy in its final stages of development, this evaluation would be especially val...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The architecture, environment and construction industry is facing, on the one hand, ambitious environmental regulations for low carbon and net zero energy buildings, and on the other hand, the emergence of new techniques such as parametric assessment and cloud computing. As a result, there is a dramatic increase of performance analysis and collecte...
Article
Assessment of the environmental impacts of furniture and appliances throughout the LCA of a nearly net-zero energy building. • Furniture is responsible for around 10% and appliances for 25% of the building''s overall impacts. • Embodied impacts dominate over the operational phase impacts. • For offices, laptops have the greatest impacts the source...
Article
Buildings are increasingly required to be efficient not just in their operation, but from construction to demolition. Thus, interest in natural construction materials with low embodied environmental impacts has increased, (re)inventing materials and components from vernacular architecture. Compressed Earth Bricks (CEBs) are an example of this kind...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To investigate the relationship between occupants’ perception of control over building elements and their comfort, we conducted a study where two prototype office rooms were compared: while the first room allowed occupants to open or close the window and configure the shading, the second one was fully automated. The quantitative analysis of collect...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To face climate change, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets are specified into national policies. In France, the objective is to divide by 4 (Factor 4) the GHG emissions by 2050 comparing to 1990. The built environment, as a main contributor, is targeted by these policies: the future 2020 French regulation will set up GHG emissions targets for th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The smart living lab project is a pioneering, inter-disciplinary and inter-institutional platform that combines several fields of research related to construction technologies. It aims to be a center of national scope, recognized on an international level and involving a variety of players and institutions. One of the smart living lab’s projects is...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Developing building projects with low environmental impacts is a real challenge, yet a problem faced every day by designers. To that end, in the design process, iteration between propositions and objectives have been used that are complex and time consumption. The impact targets leading to low-carbon buildings have the potential to simplify this co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To face climate change, Switzerland has introduced the 2050 energy strategy by fixing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the built environment. Designers will, as a result, have to use Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) to increase operating performances while minimizing embodied impacts, but the integration of LCA at an early design stage adds a degree o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Due to different temporal combinations of energy generation processes, the global warming potential (GWP) of energy supply evolves constantly. Despite this, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to the energy consumption in buildings are commonly assessed with yearly averaged carbon content of the energy supply. The knowledge of the hourly car...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Although a building lifetime is not predictable, it is an essential data in the yearly impact calculation. Yet, in the assessment of the environmental impacts of building the lifetime is considered as a fixed value. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new dynamic interpretation of LCA results, which aims at improving the reliability of asse...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The building sector is known as a major contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy consumption. These impacts are commonly evaluated by life cycle assessment (LCA), which assess the potential impacts of a building from the construction to the end of life. LCA considers: the operating impacts (OI) occurring during the service life of b...

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Projects (2)
Project
Constructing the smart living building means producing a building ahead of its time, since it will respond to goals set for the year 2050. Nowadays, a person consumes in average 5,500 watts. The goal is to reduce this consumption to 3,500 watts by 2050. Likewise, a person emits 7.2 tons of CO2 a year. The objective is to reduce this emission to 2 tons per person per year. Therefore, the construction of the the smart living building implies finding answers to these 2050 goals and setting an example. Its construction will start in 2017 and this building will house the research activities of the smart living lab as of 2020. Around 80-100 workstations are planned to be installed. While waiting for the final building, the smart living lab research teams will work on the temporary premises in the Blue Hall on the blueFACTORY site in Fribourg. A very full agenda! The smart living building shall not be erected without a deep preliminary research. This preparatory research consists in defining a novel approach to conceive an innovative building able to meet the criteria that actual techniques and methods cannot meet. An ambitious and trail-blazing project, the smart living building will help put into practice the energy and environmental goals set for 2050. This novel approach will eventually be applicable to the construction of other buildings. For the time being, the smart living building research group has identified five strategic directions: the life cycle assessment, the building’s flexibility, the energy strategy, the interactions with the local economy and the architectural quality. From research to practice Concrete actions will be undertaken to make sure that the results of the preliminary research will be respected during the design and construction of the smart living building. Hence, the research group places a particular emphasis on confronting the results to field reality. In order to do so, some events encouraging meeting and debating with building experts are organized. Furthermore, experiments with a view to constructing the smart living building will be conducted in the Blue Hall, which will temporarily welcome the smart living lab. Gigantic lab The smart living lab research teams will be able to carry out hands-on and real-time tests on certain specific uses and technologies on this futuristic construction, which explains the “living lab” denomination. A real laboratory designed to perform architectural and environmental experiments, whose goal is to optimize current techniques and innovate. While elaborating this technological exhibit, the focus will be put on the users’ well-being and on the environmental issues. Space for offices, experiments and lodgings The smart living building will not only welcome the research teams’ offices, but also spaces for carrying out experiments on prototypes and housing. Around 1'000 m² are planned for flats, which will be designed with a focus on the future inhabitants’ well-being. Research to improve this well-being will be conducted before moving in, but also once inhabitants have settled down. Improvements can also be done when the building will be achieved. Flexibility The ability to adjust a building to the users’ needs, to potential changes of function (such as offices being transformed into lodgings and vice-versa) as well as to new standards, can be summed up into one word: flexibility. The smart living building will be an example of flexibility and its initial architectural design will enable its transformation all throughout its lifecycle while reducing environmental impacts, costs and time. In that sense, flexibility goes against the buildings’ obsolescence.