Thomas R. Hester

Thomas R. Hester
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Department of Anthropology

Ph.D UC Berkeley 1972

About

128
Publications
12,873
Reads
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1,852
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
374 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
20172018201920202021202220230204060
Introduction
Texas archaeology; Colha, Belize, obsidian source analysis for Texas sites
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 1987 - August 2003
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Professor of Anthropology, emeritus
Description
  • Prof/ of Anthropology. UT-Austin 1987-2003 (prior, Prof. of Anthropology, UT-San Antonio 1973-1987 Dir. Texas Archeological Res. Lab, UT Austin 1987-2000 (prior , Dir. Center for Archaeol.Research, UT-San Antonio)
September 1974 - September 1987
University of Texas at San Antonio
Position
  • Managing Director

Publications

Publications (128)
Article
Full-text available
A corner-tang biface made of obsidian is reported and described in this paper. Unique among this well known lithic form of the Late Archaic, we were further able to obtain XRF data to link the obsidian to its source.
Article
Full-text available
In late October, 1974, the Center for Archaeological Research of the University of Texas at San Antonio carried out an archaeological survey of the upper Salado Creek Watershed. Localities slated for the construction of 10 Soil Conservation Service floodwater retarding structures were examined, and 29 prehistoric and historic archaeological sites w...
Article
Full-text available
In accordance with an agreement (Purchase Order No. 427-TX-SCS-75) between the U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service and the Center for Archaeological Research at The University of Texas at San Antonio, an archaeological survey was carried out in a potion of the Chiltipin-San Fernando Creeks Watershed in Jim Wells County, Texas....
Article
Full-text available
Obsidian artifacts are one of the few material culture remains on East Texas sites that provide direct evidence of distant links between East Texas’s native American peoples and native American communities in the Southwest or the Northwestern Plains. Other such material culture items include marine shells from the Gulf of California, turquoise from...
Chapter
Full-text available
The First Maya Lithics Conference was organized 1976 by Norman Hammond and Thomas Hester and held in Orange Walk, Belize. The conference was held to highlight the unique site of Colha, rediscovered by the Corazal Project of the British Museum. Interest stimulated by the conference resulted in 16 field seasons of investigations at the site directed...
Article
Full-text available
This volume is an overview of Texas Indian cultures from a historian's perspective. It suffers, in places, from both technical and interpretative errors often made by non-specialists trying to synthesize broad topics in anthropology and archaeology. For example, the author states that some Texas Paleo Indians used spear points with "blood gutters,"...
Article
This chapter examines some of the data that have emerged in recent years, illuminating various aspects of prehistoric cultural patterns during the latter part of the Archaic in southern Texas (Figure 10.1). The region under consideration is known as the Rio Grande Plain, south of the Edwards Plateau and between the Guadalupe River and the Rio Grand...
Article
The southern Texas archeological area (Fig. 4.1) has been the subject of synthesis in a book-length treatment by Hester (1980b; see also Hester 1995), an overview of the western Gulf Coast Plain (Story 1985), two papers that dealt with the interior and coastal portions of this region (Black 1989a, 1989b), and a regional synthesis written in the con...
Article
Full-text available
The Maya archaeological site at Colha in northern Belize, Central America, has yielded several spouted ceramic vessels that contain residues from the preparation of food and beverages. Here we analyse dry residue samples by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry, and show t...
Article
Spouted vessels are diagnostic forms of Middle Preclassic (1000-400 B.C.) and Late Preclassic (400 B.C.-A.D. 250) Maya ceramic assemblages. Mayanists have traditionally called these vessels "chocolate pots," but until recently there has been little direct evidence to support this interpretation. In fact, few studies have focused on the role these s...
Article
Full-text available
The Maya archaeological site at Colha in northern Belize, Central America, has yielded several spouted ceramic vessels that contain residues from the preparation of food and beverages. Here we analyse dry residue samples by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization mass spectrometry, and show t...
Chapter
relative time period: Follows the Early Mesoamerican Archaic tradition, precedes the Preclassic maya tradition.
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies of the Northern Belize chert-bearing zone, which was widely exploited by the ancient Maya for the production of chipped stone artefacts, have suggested that chert from different parts of this zone might be chemically distinct. This hypothesis is tested with an expanded data base of neutron activation analyses of raw chert and chalc...
Article
Full-text available
[English] Archaeologists have long noted similarities between the lithic artifacts of the first colonists of the Greater Antilles (ca. 3500-2000 B.C.) and those from the eastern Yucatán Peninsula. Recent archaeological work in northern Belize has provided additional archaeological information on the characteristics and dating of the mainland assemb...
Article
Changes in federal legislation are challenging cultural resource managers studying Native American lifeways of the recent or distant past to document and evaluate a new class of properties-traditional cultural properties. As a class, however, traditional cultural properties are difficult to identify, and the arguments to verify their existence some...
Article
Full-text available
The results of trace-element analysis of 200 prismatic blades from Colha, Belize, are reported. Questions concerning possible elite control and restriction of obsidian distribution, and the relative decline and increase of the El Chayal and Ixtepeque sources in varying functional contexts within lower- and upper-status areas are the primary focus o...
Article
A high-precision, non-destructuve x-ray fluorescence (XRF) method has been developed for the determination of both trace and major elements in obsidian archaeological artifacts. Other than brushing the artifact surface clean, no sample preparation is required. The method developed proves XRF to be an extremely valuable technique for the analysis of...
Article
[English] Moholy-Nagy (1990) has argued that concentrations of chipped-stone debitage from mesoamerican sites, including Colhá, Belize, represent dumps and not workshops as we have suggested (Shafer and Hester 1983, 1986). She emphasizes microdebitage as the most reliable indicator of workshop location. Her argument is supported by the use of ethno...
Article
More than a decade of research has been conducted at the Maya site of Colha in northern Belize. These investigations have demonstrated that lithic craft specialization flourished there for perhaps two millennia. Archaeological evidence reveals that both utilitarian and non‐utilitarian tools were exported in large numbers to regional Maya consumers.
Book
Full-text available
The South Texas area, Region 3 of the Southwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is synthesized from archeological and bioarcheological perspectives. Three distinct geographic units within Region 3 are treated in detail: Central Texas Plateau Prairie, South Texas Plains, and Lower Pecos Canyonlands. More than 11,000 years of human adaptat...
Article
Comments are offered on the inappropriate use of Texas-derived projectile point typology at certain Mesoamerican sites. Moholy-Nagy et al. (1984) recently applied labels to point groups from the Maya site of Tikal that are misleading in terms of the original type descriptions. Similar misuse of the Texas typology in central Mexico and in the Tehuac...
Article
The definition and existence of specialized chert tool workshops and workshop deposits at Colha, Belize are addressed in this reply. Density estimates are provided for workshop deposits along with revised production estimates for the Late Preclassic Period. A pattern is beginning to emerge in the Maya lowlands with regards to communities of craft s...
Article
The region of the Maya Lowlands that is now northern Belize has two major lithic resources that were utilized by prehistoric populations. The major resource is chert, restricted to a 500‐square kilometre zone. To the west and north, geologic faults have exposed outcroppings of chalcedony, a much poorer quality material, in this instance, for stone...
Article
In a recent paper, Marcus (1983) provides a timely synthesis of the rapidly accumulating body of data from various projects in the Maya Lowlands. One of the specific problems discussed by Marcus is that of temporal and cultural definition of the Swasey phase at the sites of Cuello and Colha, and its relationship to other early components. Our comme...
Article
Recent archaeological work at Colha and at other localities in the geographically restricted chert-bearing zone of northern Belize has revealed large-scale exploitation of chert for stone tool production. Workshops dated during the Late Preclassic period signal the beginning of craft specialization in chert working that continued in the Late Classi...
Article
The first occurrence of a fluted point from the Maya lowlands of Belize is documented in this paper. This heavily patinated artifact was found at Ladyville #1, a surface site near Belize City. It is of interest that similarly patinated chert tools from various periods of Maya culture were also found at the site and the paper discusses the nature of...
Article
Full-text available
Robert Fleming Heizer, 1915-1979 - Volume 47 Issue 1 - Thomas R. Hester
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of a contemporary alabaster-working technology in a small village in Upper Egypt. It discusses a variety of information pertaining to ancient alabaster vessel manufacture in Egypt. The contemporary industry operates under different social and economic pressures than those of dynastic times. Ancient workshops have b...
Article
Archaeological and ethnohistorical research has been greatly accelerated in southern Texas in the past five years. A new body of data obtained through extensive surveys, major excavations and intensified archival studies make possible a more detailed view of the area’s 11 ,000-year record of hunting and gathering lifeways. We can begin to replace t...
Article
This article is a response to the review article by William Longacre published in this issue of the Journal of Field Archaeology.
Article
In late March 1978, Tennessee Gas Pipeline (Houston) authorized the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio, to carry out Phase II investigations along the proposed route of the Del Norte pipeline, southern Texas. The Center had conducted an initial historical and archaeological assessment of the pipeline route in...
Article
The Chaparrosa Ranch, located in Zavala County, southern Texas constitutes an ideal area for long-range archaeological research. Flowing' through the ranch are Chaparrosa and Turkey Creeks, two major tributaries in the Nueces River system. These creeks and subsidiary drainages have cut pronounced valleys and terrace systems. As of this writing, nea...
Article
In 1970, a controlled surface collection was carried out at site 24 PW 320 in the Avon Valley of Montana. Lithic samples were obtained from two areas within the site. Analysis of the chipped stone debris, as well as the finished tools, has provided information on aboriginal activities at these two loci during the late prehistoric era.
Article
On March 2 and 3, 1977, an archaeological survey of the area surrounding Tule Lake, in Corpus Christi, Texas, was conducted by the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio. The reconnaissance was authorized by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Galveston District, prior to disposal of fill resulting from harbor dre...
Article
In January, 1977, the City of San Antonio Department of Parks and Recreation (Ronald L. Darner, Director) and the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio (Thomas R. Hester, Director), entered into a contract for the archaeological assessment of John James Park. The park property (Fig. 1), is located just north of...
Article
During October and November 1976, the Center for Archaeological Research of The University of Texas at San Antonio carried out an archaeological survey of the Radium Springs area in southern New Mexico (Fig. 1). This survey was conducted under the terms of a contract (YA-5l2-RFP6-80) between the Center and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Dr. T...
Article
In the Spring of 1975, the Center for Archaeological Research was approached by the Parks and Recreation Department of the City of San Antonio regarding possible archaeological and historical research at Alamo Plaza. The proposed investigations were in connection with the city's plan to renovate the plaza, to coincide with the American Bicentennial...
Article
During late March, 1976, the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio, conducted an archaeological reconnaissance in the vicinity of McQueeney, in Guadalupe County, Texas. This reconnaissance had been authorized by the McQueeney Municipal Utility District in connection with its plans for sewage lines and waste trea...
Article
In May, 1976, archaeological testing was carried out adjacent to the tower on the southeast corner of Mission San Francisco de la Espada (Fig. 1). The field work was conducted by an archaeological team from the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio. Principal investigator for the project was Dr. Thomas R. Hester...
Article
Full-text available
In January, 1976, Hayden Whitsett, archaeologist for the Texas Water Quality Board, carried out an initial archaeological reconnaissance of areas to be affected by the construction of new sewage treatment plant and lines in Natalia, Texas (Medina County WCID #3; Whitsett 1976). As a result of Whitsett's survey, five archaeological sites (41 ME 18-M...
Article
As a result of intensified archaeological activity in northern Belize, and specifically the work of the joint British Museum-Cambridge University research project (directed by Norman Hammond), a variety of new data have been obtained on the prehistory of this region. Of the many sites that have been mapped, tested, or otherwise investigated in the...
Article
Full-text available
In August, 1976, the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio, conducted an intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Floodwater Retarding Structure No.1 area, in the Upper Cibolo Creek Watershed, Kendall County, Texas. The work was carried out under the terms of a contract (135-TX-SCS-76) with the U.S.D.A. S...
Article
Evidence of a late prehistoric and protohistoric blade technology has been found at a number of sites on the central and southern Texas coast. Blades and cores from two major sites, Kirchmeyer and Indian Island, are described in detail. Wear pattern analyses of the materials indicate that laterally-trimmed blades functioned as cutting tools or kniv...
Article
Full-text available
In November, 1974, an archaeological survey was carried out portions of the Comal River Watershed, Comal County, Texas (Figs. 1, 2). These investigations resulted from an agreement (427-SCS-TX-75) between the U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service and the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio. Fieldwork was conducte...
Article
In accordance with an agreement between URS/Forrest and Cotton, Inc., consulting engineers (Dallas, Texas), and the Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio, an archaeological survey was conducted on property adjacent to the Del Rio International Airport, Val Verde County, Texas. The specific area examined during...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is concerned with the last several hundred years of the prehistoric period in the southern part of Texas. The earlier human occupation of this region, extending back perhaps 11,000 years, has been summarized elsewhere (Hester 197la). The Paleo-Indian period is represented by scattered surface finds of Clovis and Fol6om projectile points,...
Article
During February, 1975, the Center for Archaeological Research at The University of Texas at San Antonio carried out an archaeological survey of the Upper Cibolo Creek Watershed in Kendall County, Texas. The Soil Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture proposes to construct four floodwater retarding structures on upper Ci...
Article
Full-text available
In September, 1975, personnel of the Center for Archaeological Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio, carried out archaeological survey and assessment of areas slated for modification in the Laredo International Bridge II project. The field work followed standard archaeological procedures and was conducted under the terms of an ordinance...

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