Thomas C. Hart

Thomas C. Hart
Franklin and Marshall College · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

17
Publications
7,989
Reads
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270
Citations
Introduction
Anthropologist, archaeologist, and paleoethnobotanist whose main research focus is on the role of plants and the environment in the development of social complexity and the collapse of civilizations with occasional forays into the peopling of the Americas, the origins of agriculture, and historic archaeology.
Additional affiliations
July 2015 - present
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2015 - December 2016
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2014 - present
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Research Engineering/ Scientist Associate I-Lab Manager
Description
  • My responsibilities include participating in the research and publication of projects associated with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory; training students and visiting researchers; monitoring and maintaining laboratory equipment.
Education
August 2007 - May 2014
University of Connecticut
Field of study
  • Anthropology
August 2004 - May 2007
University of Missouri
Field of study
  • Anthropology
August 2000 - May 2004
St. Mary's College of Maryland
Field of study
  • Sociology/Anthropology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Early Archaic subsistence strategies of New England remain poorly understood despite their importance in helping researchers understand how people adapt to changing landscapes following the end of the last glacial maximum (21,000‐14,000 B.P.). Excavations at the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation in Mashantucket, Connecticut during the 1990s revealed...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from the Mongolian Neolithic to the Bronze Age is not well understood. Within Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, over a period of five years, we identified a number of sites with dense surface artefact scatters and features that seem to represent this transition period. Evident in those concentrations are characteristic microblade cores, micro...
Article
Full-text available
Since the end of the Pleistocene some 11,700 years ago, the landscape and vegetation of the Mongolian Gobi Desert has been profoundly changing, punctuated by the appearance of lakes, wetlands, and finally aridification. Vegetation communities have responded to these changes according to temperature shifts and northward to southward movements of the...
Article
Full-text available
Since Naomi Miller’s first discussion of dung fuel within macro-botanical samples from Malyan, Iran, considerations of dung fuel across Southwest Asia have become commonplace, yes archaeobotanists remain divided on: (1) the extent to which dung fuel contributed to archaeobotanical assemblages relative to remnants of repeated crop processing and hou...
Article
Full-text available
Renewed excavations at the Neolithic site of Beisamoun (Upper Jordan Valley, Israel) has resulted in the discovery of the earliest occurrence of an intentional cremation in the Near East directly dated to 7031-6700 cal BC (Pre-Pottery Neolithic C, also known as Final PPNB, which spans ca. 7100-6400 cal BC). The funerary treatment involved in situ c...
Article
This special issue examines new trends in phytolith scholarship and assesses the future direction of this field of research. The papers presented represent a broader shift in phytolith research into a new phase called the “Period of Expanding Applications”. It is characterized by 1) a rapid increase in the number of phytolith publications; 2) a div...
Article
Phytoliths are microscopic structures arising from silica present in plant tissues, are finding a wide variety of uses, from archaeology to forensics. Phytoliths, microscopic silica bodies produced in plants, can survive for millions of years and are finding new applications in diverse fields such as forensic science, vertebrate paleontology, and a...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture and subsistence practices are believed to play an important role in the development of social complexity in Mesopotamia. However, very little palaeoethnobotanical research has been conducted to test this assumption. This dissertation examines comparative plant materials from Southwest Asia and archaeological materials from the 2008–2010...
Article
Full-text available
Starch grain analysis is a rapidly growing field of archaeological research in Southwest Asia. However, much work still remains regarding which taxa produce starch grains that can be identified in the archaeological record. In this paper, I centralize what is known about starch production patterns within regional flora and analyze 64 previously uns...
Article
Early Archaic subsistence strategies of New England remain poorly understood despite their importance in helping researchers understand how people adapt to changing landscapes following the end of the last glacial maximum (21,000-14,000 B.P.). Excavations at the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation in Mashantucket, Connecticut during the 1990s revealed...
Article
Archaeologists use survey artifacts to study any number of interesting topics. The focus of this study is to test the usefulness of starch grains and phytoliths found on artifacts recovered during archaeological survey. Phytolith and starch grain analysis was used to determine the level of environmental contamination on three types of medieval cera...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We know that at La Milpa, the Maya built agricultural terraces. We don't know what they were growing there and why. What were the Maya growing in the city's public center? How do these crops relate to the rise and collapse of a city of 20,000 people by the end of AD900? To try to get to the bottom of this we will be excavating the terraces during the summer of 2017 and testing the surrounding soil for plant remains. Become part of our research team by going here: https://experiment.com/projects/feeding-the-gods-plants-food-and-the-maya-collapse-at-temple-3-la-milpa-belize