Thomas A. Daniel

Thomas A. Daniel
Westfield State University · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

35
Publications
11,924
Reads
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396
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
Westfield State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2016 - present
Westfield State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2015 - August 2016
College of William and Mary
Position
  • Visiting Assistant Professor
Education
May 2012 - May 2015
Auburn University
Field of study
  • Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences
August 2010 - May 2012
Auburn University
Field of study
  • Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences
August 2006 - December 2009
Georgia Southern University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Many species have demonstrated the capacity to learn abstract concepts. Recent studies have shown that the quantity of stimuli used during training plays a critical role in how subjects learn abstract concepts. As the number of stimuli available in the training set increases, so too does performance on novel combinations. The role of set size has b...
Article
Full-text available
The current study examined whether pigeons could learn to use abstract concepts as the basis for conditionally switching behavior as a function of time. Using a mid-session reversal task, experienced pigeons were trained to switch from matching-to-sample (MTS) to non-matching-to-sample (NMTS) conditional discriminations within a session. One group...
Article
Full-text available
The present study sought to explicate the time-course of posttraumatic stress (PTS)-related attentional bias to threat (ABT) by examining differences in attention bias variability (ABV; a measure which accounts for the temporal dynamics of ABT). A dot-probe task with four presentation durations was used to capture both subliminal and supraliminal s...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, much of what we know about human memory has been discovered in experiments using visual and verbal stimuli. In two experiments, participants demonstrated reliably high recognition for nonverbal liquids. In Experiment 1, participants showed high accuracy for recognizing tastes (bitter, salty, sour, sweet) over a 30-s delay in a recogni...
Preprint
When participants are given plot-crucial information, or a “spoiler,” before reading a short story, the story is subsequently enjoyed as much as, or more than, unspoiled stories (Leavitt & Christenfeld, 2011, 2013). Other research (Rosenbaum & Johnson, 2016; Levine, Betzner, & Autry, 2016) offers a more complicated picture, showing that these findi...
Article
Full-text available
Theory and empirical evidence suggest that those with higher posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and better attentional control (i.e., the strategic control of higher-order executive attention in regulating bottom-up, stimulus driven responses to prepotent stimuli; Sarapas et al., 2017) can use that ability to disengage and shift attention away fro...
Article
Full-text available
Background and objectives Current theories of health anxiety and a growing body of empirical literature suggest that those high in health anxiety symptoms might find uncertainty itself threatening and demonstrate attentional biases for uncertainty-related information (ABU). Moreover, a dual processes model of attention would suggest that individual...
Article
Full-text available
Individual differences in attentional control may explain null findings and inconsistent patterns of threat-related attentional bias (ABT) that are common in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) literature. At Time 1 (T1), trauma-exposed community participants (N = 89) completed a clinical interview, self-report measures, and an eye-tracking ta...
Article
There is extensive variability in cocaine-related attentional bias (AB) following trauma script exposure among cocaine-dependent (CD) patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, research is needed to identify the specific PTSD-CD patients most likely to exhibit an AB to cocaine cues. A common polymorphism in brain-derived neurotr...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is a significant number of military personnel with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) who suffer from comorbid posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTS). Although there is evidence of disruptions of the default mode network (DMN) associated with PTS and mTBI, previous studies have only studied static connectivity while ignor...
Data
APPENDIX – Supplemental material for Strength and Temporal Variance of the Default Mode Network to Investigate Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Service Members with Psychological Trauma
Article
Full-text available
As computer-mediated communication has increased, people have resorted to new ways of communicating with each other that extend beyond text. One of these ways is the emoji—a graphical symbol used to represent faces or objects. This nonverbal symbol has the ability to hold a variety of meanings: happiness, sadness, comfort, or even sarcasm (Walther...
Article
Full-text available
While spoilers are culturally regarded as something that detracts enjoyment from a narrative, research has presented a complicated picture. When Leavitt and Christenfeld presented participants plot-crucial information to individuals before reading a short story, the story was subsequently enjoyed as much as, or more than, unspoiled stories. Other r...
Article
Full-text available
While social and behavioral effects of violence in the media have been studied extensively, much less is known about how sports affect perceptions of violence. The current study examined neurofunctional differences between fans and non-fans of North American football (a contact sport) while viewing violent imagery. Participants viewed images of vio...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the present study was to examine anxiety sensitivity, attentional bias to threat (ABT), and the aggregate influence of these constructs as prospective predictors of anxiety. Participants (N = 176) completed a baseline assessment session which included the completion of self-report measures of anxiety and anxiety sensitivity, as well...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study, we examined constructs of emotion regulation (emotion regulation difficulties, expressive suppression, and cognitive reappraisal) in relation to attentional bias to threat (ABT). Participants (N = 176) completed a battery of self-report measures and an eye-tracking task in which eye movements to neutral and threat images were...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to characterize the functional activation of the neural correlates of voluntary regulation of emotion in soldiers both with and without chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a battery of cognitive and psychological health measures, we assessed differences b...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is a high comorbidity of posttraumatic stress (PTS) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), with largely overlapping symptomatology, in military service members. Objective To examine white matter integrity associated with PTS and mTBI as assessed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Method Seventy-four active-duty U.S. soldiers...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of the present study was to use eye-tracking technology to (a) show that attentional control can be used to reduce attentional bias to threat (ABT) among those with higher levels of posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, (b) identify the specific attentional control (AC) processes (i.e., inhibition, shifting, working memory updating) that...
Article
Full-text available
Although theory suggests that a bias for attending to threat information (ABT) may be a biobehavioral process underlying the transdiagnostic vulnerability factor of emotion dysregulation, there is a paucity of empirical evidence showing direct associations between emotion dysregulation and ABT. The purpose of the present study was to examine the re...
Presentation
Our ability to shape our emotional experience is termed emotion regulation (ER) [1], involving voluntary modification of emotions elicited in response to exogenous stimuli. Several functional MRI activation studies have consistently identified the middle frontal gyrus (MFG), anterior cingulate and insula to be involved in it [1]. Their limitation l...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Military service members risk acquiring posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI), with high comorbidity. Owing to overlapping symptomatology in chronic mTBI or postconcussion syndrome (PCS) and PTSD, it is difficult to assess the etiology of a patient's condition without objective measures. Using rest...
Article
Full-text available
Background Prior work examining emotional dysregulation observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has primarily been limited to fear-learning processes specific to anticipation, habituation, and extinction of threat. In contrast, the response to threat itself has not been systematically evaluated. Objective To explore potential disruption i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Previously thought to be unique to humans, abstract-concept learning has been demonstrated in a variety of species spread across the phylogenetic tree. A parameter important to abstract-concept learning is the number of training exemplars. For numerous species, increasing the number of training exemplars of the concept facilitates full transfer to...
Article
Background: One of the barriers to studying the behavioral and emotional effects of pain using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is the absence of a commercially available, MRI-compatible, pressure-based algometer to elicit pain. The present study sought to address this barrier through creation and validation of a novel MRI-safe apparat...
Article
Rhesus monkeys and humans perform more accurately in matching-to-sample tasks when the sample stimulus moves through space (Washburn, Hopkins, and Rumbaugh, 1989; Washburn, 1993). This Stimulus Movement Effect (SME) is believed to be due to movement increasing attention toward the sample stimulus, creating an easier discrimination between the sampl...
Article
Previous work in discrimination learning has shown that non-matching (oddity) tasks are learned faster and more accurately than comparable matching tasks. This learning advantage has been coined the Oddity Preference Effect (Wright & Delius, 2005). Pigeons trained in a non-matching task, following training in a same/different task, learned the abst...
Conference Paper
Military service members who sustain mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are at risk of developing post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although PTSD has been characterized by functional hyper-connectivity, results on PCS have been mixed and inconclusive. Therefore, a mechanistic neurobiological basis for PTSD wit...
Conference Paper
Functional segregation and integration are hallmarks of the human brain. The former allows specialized processing to occur within localized interconnected groups of brain regions, while the latter allows amalgamation of specialized information from distributed brain regions. These constructs have been measured using global network properties derive...
Chapter
The ability to categorize stimuli is a vital and adaptive process for humans. The cognitive and biological processes that underlie categorization, however, remain unclear. The structure of this entry follows a historical progression of the literature exploring different approaches to categorization as they pertain to exemplars and prototypes. The e...
Article
The study of visual memory has repeatedly shown qualitatively similar visual short-term memory (VSTM) systems between many human and nonhuman species. In studies of human VSTM using change detection, increasing visual object complexity has an inverse effect on accuracy. In the current study, we assessed the functional relationship between visual ob...
Article
Beaconing is a process in which the distance between a visual landmark and current position is reduced in order to return to a location. In contrast, dead reckoning is a process in which vestibular, kinesthetic and/or optic flow cues are utilized to update speed of movement, elapsed time of movement, and direction of movement to return to a locatio...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Olfactometers allow for the systematic administration of odorants to humans. I'm looking for something similar (preferably commercially-available and computer-controlled) for tastes/liquids.  I've looked around, but so far, I haven't found anything.  I'm trying to avoid making my own if possible! :-)

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