Thomas J. Cooke

Thomas J. Cooke
University of Connecticut | UConn · Department of Geography

Ph.D.

About

58
Publications
12,686
Reads
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2,756
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
1398 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
While I have traditionally defined myself as a migration scholar, two decades of research have actually focused on immobility; such as the role of demographic (primarily familial), structural (e.g., occupational regulation and child custody arrangements), and technological constraints on residential relocation and inter-regional migration. My research is now coalescing into a comprehensive perspective on the need for a more coherent conceptual and empirical focus on the causes and consequences of rootedness.
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - present
University of Connecticut
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2000 - August 2007
University of Connecticut
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 1994 - September 2000
University of Connecticut
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 1988 - March 1993
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Geography
August 1986 - May 1988
Indiana University Bloomington
Field of study
  • Geography
January 1982 - March 1988
The Ohio State University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
This study builds on recent research on the growth of suburban poverty by tracking bi-annual poverty trends in inner suburbs from 1989 to 2005 through data reported by the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Contrary to analyses based on the 1990 and 2000 censuses, this research finds that inner-ring suburban poverty increased from 1989 through 1997 bu...
Article
Americans have always been viewed, both by themselves and by others, as a migrant society. However, migration rates have reached record lows: only 1.6% of Americans moved from one state to another in 2009, and only 3.7% moved from one county to another. This research conducts a decomposition of the change in migration rates between 1999 and 2009 us...
Article
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This article uses longitudinal data for the United States and Great Britain to examine the impact of residential mobility and childbirth on the earnings of women, their family earnings, and the related division of earnings by gender. This project is the first to compare explicitly the impact of childbirth and family migration on women's earnings, a...
Article
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Separation from a spouse or cohabiting partner is associated with a high likelihood of moving, even over long distances. In this paper, we use longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the United States to analyze the role of non-resident family in the migration of separated people immediately after and in the years following un...
Article
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Using detailed geocoded microdata from the British Household Panel Survey and longitudinal random-effects models, we analyse the determinants and trajectories of geographical distances between separated parents. Findings of particular note include the following: (1) post-separation linked lives, proximities and spatial constraints are characterised...
Article
Full-text available
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1007/s10680-017-9437-1.].
Article
Wilbur Zelinsky's 1971 paper in Geographical Review entitled the “Hypothesis of the Mobility Transition” was both forward‐looking and offered innovative ideas regarding human geographic mobility. One of the most interesting aspects of the paper was a set of predictions for mobility in a “future superadvanced society”. Many of these predictions have...
Article
The paper explores why internal migration rates fell in England and Wales between 1971 to 1981 and 2001 to 2011. It considers all‐address changing rates, short‐distance migration (address changes involving moves of 10 km or less) and long‐distance migration (moves of 50 km or more). It does so by using the Blinder–Oaxaca method to decompose the dif...
Book
The frequency with which people move home has important implications for national economic performance and the well-being of individuals and families. Much contemporary social and migration theory posits that the world is becoming more mobile, leading to the recent ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences. Yet, there is mounting evidence to sug...
Article
A common presumption is that the widespread adoption of advanced information and communication technologies (ICTs) over the last several decades enhances residential mobility and migration. This research critically evaluates this presumption from the perspective of the long-term decline in residential mobility and migration in many developed countr...
Article
It is widely presumed that information and communication technologies, or ICTs, enable migration in several ways; primarily by reducing the costs of migration. However, a reconsideration of the relationship between ICTs and migration suggests that ICTs may just as well hinder migration; primarily by reducing the costs of not moving. Using data from...
Article
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Following considerable social and demographic change over the past six decades, macro-social theories have attempted to explain contemporary society through trends of weakening traditional institutions (e.g. state, church and family) and certainties (e.g. life-long full-time work and marriage) and growing self-articulation, individualisation, desta...
Article
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BACKGROUND While there is a limited body of research regarding residential mobility and migration following union dissolution, there is a particular dearth of studies that go into detail about the factors that shape how union dissolution may result in long-distance migration. OBJECTIVE This research isolates and identifies the processes that influe...
Article
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The human capital and creative class hypotheses argue that the agglomeration of skilled and creative people is key to economic growth. Migration is assumed to play an important role in forming these agglomerations. However, the results of this study indicate that while younger cohorts of skilled and creative individuals are highly mobile, skilled a...
Article
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A popular and powerful narrative focuses on a crisis of suburban decline in the United States. However, a consensus regarding the scope and scale of one dimension of suburban decline—poverty—is hindered by the use of contradictory definitions of suburban space. This research presents an alternative approach to measuring suburban poverty that is les...
Article
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Internal migration rates in the United States have been steadily declining for at least twenty-five years: In 1984, 6.4 percent of the population moved between counties but by 2006—well before the most significant economic crisis since the Great Depression—annual intercounty migration rates had already declined to 4.7 percent and by 2010 to 3.5 per...
Article
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BACKGROUND The family migration literature presumes that women are cast into the role of the tied migrant. However, clearly identifying tied migrants is a difficult empirical task, since it requires the identification of a counterfactual: who moved but did not want to? OBJECTIVES This research develops a unique methodology to directly identify both...
Article
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The National Center for Education Statistics reports that over 250,000 high school graduates moved across state lines to enroll in college in 2008. The choices made by these high ability individuals may have long-lasting implications for state economies; not only do they contribute to state and local economies through their tuition and daily living...
Article
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Women's earnings, employment, and commutes have generally lagged men's. Geographers emphasize the effects of women's gender roles on their spatial entrapment as limiting their job opportunities and labor market status. This research methodologically advances spatial entrapment research by utilizing a national model of commuting with spatial fixed e...
Article
Costa and Kahn hypothesize that the growing concentration of skilled couples in large cities is due to their migration to large cities to solve their dual-employment problem. However, there is only limited empirical evidence in support of this hypothesis. This research tests an alternative hypothesis: The intermetropolitan distribution of skilled c...
Article
In this paper, and in the Special Issue it introduces, the focus is on the role of family ties in residential location choice and, conversely, the role of residential locations in maintaining family ties. Not only do events in the nuclear family trigger residential relocations, but nearby family members living outside the household prevent some peo...
Article
This review traces the evolution of family migration research from one that was very narrowly focused on the trailing wife effect, to a transdisciplinary research topic which has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of family dynamics, life course events, family well-being, gender differences in employment and earnings, and most impor...
Article
Consistent empirical evidence demonstrates that demographic indicators associated with traditional gender roles, such as the presence of children, are linked to the negative effect of moving on married women's employment and earnings. However, very few studies have directly examined how gender role beliefs are related to family migration behaviour....
Article
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This paper examines the effect of migration and residential mobility on union dissolution among married and cohabiting couples. Moving is a stressful life event, and a large, multidisciplinary literature has shown that family migration often benefits one partner (usually the man) more than the other Even so, no study to date has examined the possib...
Article
This research investigates the interregional migration of partnered gays and lesbians between 1995 and 2000 as the first attempt at understanding the determinants of gay and lesbian migration using data from the Public Use Microdata Sample of the 2000 U.S. Census. Briefly, the findings are as follows. Both partnered gays and lesbians are regionally...
Article
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The purpose of this research is to explore the changing geographical distribution of high-poverty neighbourhoods both between and within American metropolitan areas between 1990 and 2000. Of particular concern is the relative shift in the number of high-poverty neighbourhoods between central-city, inner-ring and outer-ring suburbs. A classification...
Article
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This paper examines the effect of migration and residential mobility on union dissolution among married and cohabiting couples. While there is a large, multi-disciplinary literature looking at the determinants of union dissolution in Europe and North America, the possible impact of geographical mobility has received little attention. This is despit...
Article
The trailing wife literature finds that migration harms the employment of married women for at least several years following a move. The bulk of empirical evidence also suggests that this is due to the social construction of gender roles within the family. This research tests the gender role argument by examining the effect of moving on a family ty...
Article
Despite significant gains in educational attainment and attitudes toward women in the labor force, women continue to lag behind men in economic and labor market success. The role of family migration in social science and policy discussions of this gender-gap has gone unnoticed, in spite of the fact that nearly 25 years ago the noted economist Jacob...
Article
Despite the lack of substantive research, the spatial mismatch hypothesis remains a pervasive explanation for the high rate of African American male unemployment. This research tests the hypothesis that census tract African American male unemployment rates are negatively related to the number of local job opportunities. This hypothesis is tested fo...
Article
Objectives. This article attempts to directly observe the effect of being a tied migrant on the economic status of the civilian husbands and wives of military personnel in order to confirm whether previously observed trailing-wife effects are consistent with being a tied migrant. Methods. A sample of the civilian husbands of women in the military a...
Article
This article focuses primarily on determining the economic consequences of family migration for husbands and wives in matched married-couple families, using data from waves 1 and 2 of the National Survey of Families and Households. The analysis is designed to determine whether or not the return to migration for husbands and wives is similarly affec...
Article
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In this paper we explore how family relations influence the migration decisions of partners in dual-earner households. Specifically, we focus on how care responsibilities link the lives of partners, their children, and their parents, and how these 'linked lives' enable and constrain migration. We adopt a grounded theory approach and interview partn...
Article
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Many studies of long-distance family migration demonstrate that female partners are often disenfranchised in the labour market. One factor that has not been fully considered is the role of children. Heterosexual couples may be more likely to migrate in favour of the male 'breadwinner's' career if the couple have children, or are planning to commenc...
Article
Previously we have demonstrated that long-distance family migration has a negative effect on the employment status of partnered women in both Great Britain (GB) and the USA; in fact the results for GB and the USA were remarkably similar. Here we investigate three issues that might have masked potential differences in the results between GB and the...
Article
Previously we have demonstrated that long-distance family migration has a negative effect on the employment status of partnered women in both Great Britain (GB) and the USA; in fact the results for GB and the USA were remarkably similar. Here we investigate three issues that might have masked potential differences in the results between GB and the...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we consider the effects of family migration on women's employment status, using census microdata from Great Britain and the United States. We test a simple hypothesis that families tend to move long distances in favor of the male's career and that this can have a detrimental effect on women's employment status. Unlike many previous st...
Article
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Numerous studies demonstrate that married women sacrifice their own careers in order to support their husbands' careers by following them as tied migrants, largely independent of their own occupational status. Thus, it appears as if family migration is shaped by the dominant gender roles and gender identities which configure the lives of women and...
Article
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This article presents an interpretive progress report on the neighborhood‐level effects of homeownership policy. The expansion of targeted lending initiatives has created unprecedented opportunities for ownership among low‐ to moderate‐income (LMI) families, racial and ethnic minorities, and other populations once excluded from the nation's mainstr...
Article
Presents the findings of a study of long distance migrations for employment opportunities in both the US and the UK. Compares the cross-national differences between the two countries and tries to investigate the effects of the relative resources of the partner in their subsequent search for employment. Attempts to discover any gender differences ba...
Article
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This research conceptualises, measures and evaluates the effects of sample selection bias on models of commuting time. Data are drawn from the Public Use Microdata Sample of the 1990 US Census for the Boston metropolitan area. The major finding of the analysis is that the process that determines entry into employment introduces sample selection bia...
Article
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Responding to previous analyses that assume that places are passive recipients of the various macro-level social phenomena associated with concentrated urban poverty, I hypothesize that concentrated urban poverty takes on different forms in different places as a result of how macro-level social phenomena are mediated by locally specific structures....
Article
PIP This paper investigates the problems in integrating different data sets for social science research. A cross-national analysis of the effects of family migration on labor market participation rates for female partners was used as an example to concretize these problems. The data used in the cross national analysis came from the 1991 British Cen...
Article
"This article uses event history data to specify a model of employment returns to initial migration, onward migration, and return migration among newly married persons in the U.S. Husbands are more likely to be full-time employed than wives, and being a parent reduces the employment odds among married women. Employment returns to repeated migration...
Article
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PIP Mexican-Americans comprise the US's second largest minority group and one of its fastest growing minorities. Between 1980 and 1990, there was a 54% increase in the number of Mexican-Americans in the US, with half of the increase due to births and the remainder from immigration. The authors analyzed the effects of migration upon the employment o...
Article
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The spatial-mismatch hypothesis argues that African American labor-force participation is reduced by African Americans' inability to gain access to relatively distant suburban job opportunities. A significant limitation of the mismatch literature is that it has failed to recognize that a number of factors associated with gender may interact with ra...
Article
This research tests the spatial mismatch hypothesis by comparing the employment probabilities of central city versus suburban African American males in nine metropolitan areas. Treatment effects models are used to control for the effects of both individual characteristics and residential self-selection on the probability of employment. A positive e...
Article
"This research reconsiders the human capital hypothesis that married women have a lower probability of employment after family migration. The empirical analysis focuses on a sample of married parents in the economically active population residing in the midwestern United States in 1980. Our analysis establishes that, after controlling for the effec...
Article
Full-text available
This research focuses on the spatial mismatch hypothesis as an explanation for the concentration of unemployment in the central cities of the industrial Midwest. It is argued that the immobility of low-wage labor relative to the mobility of employment results in either the exploitation or isolation of low-wage labor. In the contemporary period, the...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have been added to the US Fulbright Specialist Roster. The Fulbright Specialist Program sends U.S. faculty and professionals to serve as expert consultants on curriculum, faculty development, institutional planning, and related subjects at academic institutions abroad for a period of 2 to 6 weeks. One dimension of the program that interests me is that an eligible host institution can design a project directly naming a specialist for the project. See https://exchanges.state.gov/us/program/fulbright-specialist-program.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Partner relationships, residential relocations and housing are crucial to people’s well-being and are known to be connected with each other. Many aspects of this connection, however, have remained under-researched or unexplored thus far: living-apart-together besides co-residential partnerships, long-term effects, mutual causality, full trajectories rather than one-at-a-time events, and the impact of the contextual background. The PartnerLife project addresses the following research question: How do partner trajectories and residential trajectories develop in relation to each other in people’s life courses? How are these trajectories and the interactions between them related to the contextual backgrounds of Germany, the UK and the Netherlands? We derive and test hypotheses from various micro-level theories, including rational-choice theory and bargaining models, and also develop hypotheses on the macro-level impact of welfare regimes and housing markets. Large-scale longitudinal datasets are used for the three countries. We analyse these using a variety of standard and advanced longitudinal methods, including multilevel event history analysis, sequence analysis and dyadic models. Our results will enhance the scientific insight into partner trajectories and residential trajectories in the life courses of linked individuals. PartnerLife is a collaborative project between the University of Groningen (Prof. Clara H. Mulder & Dr Michael J. Thomas), the University of Cologne (Prof. Michael Wagner & Dr Sandra Krapf), and the University of Liverpool (Prof. Hill Kulu & Dr. Julia Mikolai).