Thomas Beelen

Thomas Beelen
University of Twente | UT · Department of Human Media Interaction (HMI)

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8
Publications
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30
Citations

Publications

Publications (8)
Chapter
Karen is a conversational agent taking the role of an angry customer in a retail context. While the user (retail employee) tries to convince Karen to follow the rules, the agent interrupts the user, and verbally and nonverbally reacts to the user’s sentiments.
Preprint
Full-text available
Our research project (CHATTERS) is about designing a conversational robot for children's digital information search. We want to design a robot with a suitable conversation, that fosters a responsible trust relationship between child and robot. In this paper we give: 1) a preliminary view on an empirical study around children's trust in robots that...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this paper, we identify challenges in children's current information retrieval process, and propose conversational robots as an opportunity to ease this process in a responsible way. Tools children currently use in this process, such as search engines on a computer or voice agents, do not always meet their specific needs. The conversational robo...
Conference Paper
This paper presents a novel platform for supporting human-centric design of future on-board user interfaces. This is conceived to facilitate the interplay and information exchange among onboard digital information systems, autonomous AI agents and human passengers and drivers. Two Human-to-AI (H2AI) Augmented Reality (AR) interfaces, characterized...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Carefully designed nonverbal behavior can supply minimally actuated non-anthropomorphic robots with the communicative power necessary to engage in playful tasks with children. However, this user group brings unique challenges for interaction designers as (i) it is often hard to understand how nonverbal robot behavior is perceived and interpreted by...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper we investigate whether remote touch in the form of force feedback from another player’s actions can enhance feelings of social presence and enjoyment of a collaborative, spatially distributed rope pulling game. Dyads of players situated in different rooms were either given an ‘elastic band’ type force feedback, or were given force fee...

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