Theresa Rueger

Theresa Rueger
Newcastle University | NCL

PhD

About

20
Publications
2,119
Reads
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136
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
125 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
In social groups, high reproductive skew is predicted to arise when the reproductive output of a group is limited, and dominant individuals can suppress subordinate reproductive efforts. Reproductive suppression is often assumed to occur via overt aggression or the threat of eviction. It is unclear, however, whether the threat of eviction alone is...
Article
Full-text available
A central issue in evolutionary ecology is how patterns of dispersal influence patterns of relatedness in populations. In terrestrial organisms, limited dispersal of offspring leads to groups of related individuals. By contrast, for most marine organisms, larval dispersal in open waters is thought to minimize kin associations within populations. Ho...
Article
Full-text available
Animals forming social groups that include breeders and non‐breeders present evolutionary paradoxes; why do breeders tolerate non‐breeders? And why do non‐breeders tolerate their situation? Both paradoxes are often explained with kin selection. Kin selection is, however, assumed to play little or no role in social group formation of marine organism...
Article
Full-text available
Research on sociality in marine fishes is a vibrant field that is providing new insights into social evolution more generally. Here, we review the past two decades of research, identifying knowledge gaps and new directions. Two coral reef fishes, with social systems similar to other cooperative breeders, have emerged as models: the clown anemonefis...
Article
Many animal groups consist of dominance hierarchies. Theoretical models suggest that higher-ranked individuals should increase aggression but should decrease helping unless the cost of helping decreases with higher rank. Most empirical tests focus on systems with kin selection, whereas tests for groups in which individuals are unrelated are rare. H...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the patterns and causes of variation in reproductive success is key to understanding mating systems and sexual selection, but they are challenging to study in cryptobenthic coral reef fishes. Here, we investigate characteristics of breeding habitat, the genetic mating system, and correlates of male mating success in the neon goby Elacat...
Article
Full-text available
Vertebrate growth can be phenotypically plastic in response to predator–prey and competitive interactions. It is unknown however, if it can be plastic in response to mutualistic interactions. Here we investigate plasticity of vertebrate growth in response to variation in mutualistic interactions, using clown anemonefish and their anemone hosts. In...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many animal groups consist of individuals organised in dominance hierarchies, based on age, size or fighting ability. Lower ranked individuals often do not reproduce themselves but perform cooperative behaviours to help the reproductive output of dominant individuals or the group as a whole. Theoretical models suggest that individuals of higher ran...
Article
Plasticity, the capacity of individuals to respond to changing environments by modifying traits, may be critically important for population persistence by allowing for adaptive responses on shorter timescales than genetic change. Here, we use the clown anemonefish (Amphiprion percula), whose access to resources is constrained by their anemones, to...
Article
Full-text available
Many vertebrates form monogamous pairs to mate and care for their offspring. However, genetic tools have increasingly shown that many offspring arise from matings outside of the monogamous pair bond. Social monogamy is relatively common in coral reef fishes, but there have been relatively few studies that have confirmed monogamy or extra‐pair repro...
Article
Full-text available
It is being increasingly recognized that small coral reef fishes are highly specialised on branching coral substrata and are threatened by reef degradation. In the past, it has been assumed that medium-sized mobile coral reef fishes may be less at risk. This assumes medium-sized mobile fishes are not as equally associated with and susceptible to th...
Article
Full-text available
Colonial animals often form stable pair bonds, returning to the same site to breed with the same partner every year. Familiarity with both partner and breeding site has the potential to enhance an individual’s reproductive success. However, it is often unknown whether the mating system arises because of site fidelity, mate fidelity or both. Here, o...
Article
Full-text available
It was tested whether the pajama cardinalfish Sphaeramia nematoptera (Apogonidae) could home by displacing individuals up to 250 m within and among isolated reefs. Contrary to expectations, only two of 37 (5·4%) displaced S. nematoptera returned home and another 16 (43·2%) were found to have joined other social groups and did not home after 26 mont...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals exhibit size-assortative mating, and matching theory predicts this occurs because both males and females prefer bigger mates. Monogamy and size-assortative pairing have been described for coral reef fishes, but the underlying behavioral mechanism has not been tested. Here, we took a long-term observational and experimental study to res...
Article
Full-text available
Many coral reef fishes exhibit unique reproductive strategies that can play a central role in conservation programs. Cardinalfishes (f. Apogonidae) are all paternal mouthbrooders, where the male holds the fertilised eggs in his mouth until they hatch. Males may fertilise the eggs of multiple females resulting in polygyny and skewed reproductive suc...
Article
The concern about climate change has re-vitalised the interest in the relationships between body-size of organisms and temperature both at the intraspecific level (James’ rule, Temperature-Size-Rule) and at the interspecific level (Bergmann's rule). In order to test the expected shifts towards smaller body size under warming conditions, a mesocosm...

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