Theresa Redl

Theresa Redl
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics & Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University

PhD

About

11
Publications
1,001
Reads
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24
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
24 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
2016201720182019202020212022024681012
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics & Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • It's a peculiarity that many languages share: when referring to people in general, grammatically masculine word forms are often used. In my PhD project on Dutch, I investigate if their use (esp. that of masculine pronouns) leads to a cognitive male bias.
Education
September 2014 - July 2016
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Linguistics
October 2011 - July 2014
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Linguistics
October 2010 - July 2011
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Oriental Studies

Publications

Publications (11)
Preprint
An eye-tracking experiment was conducted with speakers of Dutch (N=84, 36 male), a language that falls in between grammatical and natural gender languages. We tested whether a masculine generic pronoun causes a male bias when used in generic statements, that is, in the absence of a specific referent. We tested two different types of generic stateme...
Article
Full-text available
In Polish, it is obligatory to mark feminine or masculine grammatical gender on second-person singular past tense verbs (e.g., Dostałaś list ‘You received-F a letter’). When the addressee’s gender is unknown or unspecified, masculine but never feminine gender marking may be used. The present self-paced reading experiment aims to determine whether t...
Article
Full-text available
The results of a self-paced reading experiment show that reading times in Dutch increase when there is a gender mismatch between the subject and a subsequent possessive pronoun, signaling an increase in processing difficulty. We hypothesized that Dutch learners of French incorrectly apply the rules of their L1 in their L2 and should therefore also...
Article
In an online production experiment, we investigated the effect of sentence position on the preference for either a nominative or object form of an object pronoun restricted by a relative clause in Dutch. Results show a significant preference for the nominative form of the restricted object pronoun in sentence-initial position as it was chosen in 95...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments tested whether the Dutch possessive pronoun zijn ‘his’ gives rise to a gender inference and thus causes a male bias when used generically in sentences such as Everyone was putting on his shoes . Experiment 1 ( N = 120, 48 male) was a conceptual replication of a previous eye-tracking study that had not found evidence of a male bias....
Preprint
A self-paced reading experiment tested if a generically-used masculine personal pronoun leads to a male bias in online processing. We presented Dutch native speakers (N=95, 47 male) with generic statements featuring the masculine pronoun hij ‘he’ (e.g., Someone who always promises that he will really be on time, such as Ms/Mr Knoop, will sometimes...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers of a language sometimes use particular constructions which violate prescriptive grammar rules. Despite their prescriptive ungrammaticality, they can occur rather frequently. One such example is the comparative construction in Dutch and similarly in German, where the equative particle is used in comparative constructions instead of the pres...
Article
Full-text available
Gender-(mis)matching pronouns have been studied extensively in experiments. However, a phenomenon common to various languages has thus far been overlooked: the systemic use of non-feminine pronouns when referring to female individuals. The present study is the first to provide experimental insights into the interpretation of such a pronoun: Limburg...
Article
Full-text available
Language users often infer a person’s gender when it is not explicitly mentioned. This information is included in the mental model of the described situation, giving rise to expectations regarding the continuation of the discourse. Such gender inferences can be based on two types of information: gender stereotypes (e.g., nurses are female) and masc...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Our aim is to explore the interpretation of pronouns. We investigate properties such as person, gender, and politeness in different types of pronouns, such as personal and possessive pronouns.