Theresa R Keates

Theresa R Keates
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Ocean Sciences

PhD Ocean Sciences

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10
Publications
2,178
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99
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
98 Citations
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Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Chlorophyll concentration in the ocean is a metric for phytoplankton biomass, which forms the base of most pelagic food webs and is a critical component of the planet's carbon cycle. Phytoplankton biomass has been designated an Essential Ocean Variable (EOV), but in situ chlorophyll measurements are challenging and expensive to obtain, especially i...
Article
Full-text available
Bio‐logging data obtained by tagging animals is key to addressing global conservation challenges. However, the many thousands of existing bio‐logging datasets are not easily discoverable, universally comparable, nor readily accessible through existing repositories and across platforms. This slows down ecological research and effective management. A...
Article
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Small mesopelagic fishes dominate the world's total fish biomass, yet their ecological importance as prey for large marine animals is poorly understood. To reveal the little-known ecosystem dynamics, we identified prey, measured feeding events, and quantified the daily energy balance of 48 deep-diving elephant seals throughout their oceanic migrati...
Article
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Marine animals equipped with biological and physical electronic sensors have produced long-term data streams on key marine environmental variables, hydrography, animal behavior and ecology. These data are an essential component of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS). The Animal Borne Ocean Sensors (AniBOS) network aims to coordinate the long-t...
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The role of mesoscale features in structuring trophic transfer in the mesopelagic zone is poorly understood. Deploying sensors on marine animals, or “biologging,” is a powerful tool to infer the organism's behavior and simultaneously collect high-resolution oceanographic data to describe physical-biological interactions. We investigated whether mes...
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Plain Language Summary Marine heatwaves, extended periods when ocean temperatures are abnormally warm, have occurred with greater frequency and magnitude over the last few decades. As the planet continues to warm, these events will increase, with substantial effects on marine life and on the socioeconomics of communities that depend on marine resou...
Article
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Sex‐specific diet information is important in the determination of predator impacts on prey populations. Unfortunately, the diet of males and females can be difficult to describe, particularly when they are marine predators. We combined two molecular techniques to describe haul‐out use and prey preferences of male and female harbor seals (Phoca vit...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This study will evaluate the potential of 30 years of archival Animal-Borne Instrument (ABI) datasets from a variety of marine predators for oceanographic studies in two regions of the Southern Ocean. Animal tracking data will be quality controlled and processed to obtain location-based measurements of depth, temperature, light, and salinity in near-shore and under ice regions. Nearshore and under ice collected datasets will be analyzed to determine the feasibility of ABI data to explore features such as coastal mixed layer depth, melt water intrusions and light penetration that could supplement more traditional, but further from shore, ocean observing system data. Data from poorly studied hotspot regions where predators feed could be of particular importance. Funding: National Science Foundation - Office of Polar Programs