Theodoros Karyotis

Theodoros Karyotis
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Conflict and Development Studies

About

11
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Introduction
My current area of study is housing and property. I am a doctoral researcher with the ERC-funded project "Property and Democratic Citizenship", headed by Prof. Marianne Maeckelbergh at the University of Ghent. The project ethnographically explores the antinomies between claims to property and access to housing in the many areas where the two conflict.

Publications

Publications (11)
Chapter
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From 2009 on, Greece has become a laboratory of implementation of neoliberal austerity policies but has also seen fierce resistance and a surge of creative alternatives. This article aims to outline the central political imaginaries of overcoming austerity that arose in this period –Plan A of reform and redistribution, Plan B of national economic r...
Chapter
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Modern social struggles erupt as urban phenomena with a strong spatial component. City dwellers may define their desire for full participation in the city’s socio-political life as a right to the city to be reclaimed against authorities, or they may dive right in and self-manage the urban space as a commons – or they may do both. The right to the c...
Chapter
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This chapter discusses the politics of housing precarity in the time of pandemic. In Greece, the biopolitical response to the pandemic has been taking place in a context of ongoing austerity, whereby essential public services have been degraded and housing precarity, previously reserved for those at the margins, is invading the lives of the homeown...
Conference Paper
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In this presentation, I trace the mutations in political subjectivation in Greece through three important moments in the latest cycle of mobilisation: the December 2008 revolt, the square occupations of 2011, and the referendum of 2015. In all these events, political time was condensed, bringing forth different, overlapping but divergent, contentio...
Chapter
En este breve capítulo pretendo rastrear las mutaciones en los procesos de subjetivación política en Grecia en la última década a través del análisis de tres momentos importantes en los que el tiempo político se vio condensado: la Revuelta de diciembre de 2008, la ocupación de las plazas en 2011, y el referéndum de 2015, poniendo el foco sobre dive...
Conference Paper
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Owing to its particular sociopolitical history and its status as a semi-peripheral country, Greece has followed a pattern of economic and urban development radically different to that of most northern European countries. A main characteristic of that pattern is informality. This paper consists of two parts. In the first part, I examine the origins...
Chapter
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“Worker-led production” refers to a diverse set of practices that aim to give protagonism to the subjects of labour: the workers themselves. The vision of a future society directed by the “associated producers” themselves cuts across all historical currents of the left; to this day, democratic self-management at the workplace is for many an effecti...
Chapter
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Palabras clave: autogestión, recuperación, cooperativas, control obrero, trabajo La «producción dirigida por los trabajadores» se refiere a un diverso conjunto de prácticas cuyo objetivo es dar protagonismo a los sujetos del trabajo: los propios trabajadores. En las empresas recuperadas por los trabajadores se generan «ecosistemas solidarios» en...
Book
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Marks’ın konsey komünizmi, anarko-sendikalizm, İtalyan operaismo’su ve diğer “heretik” sol akımlar yoluyla Paris Komünü hakkındaki yazılarını izleyen “Emeğin Alternatif Tarihi”, şimdiye kadar görmezden gelinen tarihsel ve çağdaş otonom işçi hareketlerinin uygulama ve amaçlarını açığa çıkarmaktadır. Bu kitap, işçilerin işyerlerinde süreklilik ve öng...
Chapter
Full-text available
The history of the 20th century is the history of the push and pull between the market and the state, between private and public property, at the expense, usually, of cooperative and communal forms of social existence and production. Following the dismantling of the apparatuses of redistribution by the triumphant neoliberalism in the late 20th cent...
Book
Full-text available
The global financial crisis has led to radical forms of social protest and worker takeovers all over the globe. Tracing Marx’s writings on the Paris Commune through council communism, anarcho-syndicalism, Italian operaismo, and other autonomous social movements, this book uncovers the intentions and practices of workers’ struggles that continue in...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The Property and Democractic Citizenship project explores the impact of property regimes on experiences of citizenship across five democratic countries: Greece, The Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. Property rights are a foundational element of democracy, but the right to private property exists in tension with values of equality and a right to shelter. An investigation of property is urgent given the recent normalisation of economic models that have resulted in millions of evictions every year. Through an ethnographic study of conflicts over property this research provides a comparative analysis of the benefits and limitations of contemporary property regimes for democratic citizenship. A property regime is defined as the combination of moral discourses about real landed property with the regulatory policies and market mechanisms that shape the use, sale and purchase of property. The selected countries represent a diverse set of property regimes, but all five are experiencing a housing and eviction crisis that has created new forms of disadvantage, exacerbated inequalities of race, gender, age and income, and led to social unrest. This research critically examines the concept of property through a qualitative approach centred on moments of conflict resulting from the use, sale or purchase of specific properties to answer: how do property regimes shape people's experience of citizenship and what can this tell us about the role of property in contemporary models of democratic governance? This research provides the opportunity to rethink the role of property within democracy based on extensive empirical data about how moral assumptions combine with particular ways of regulating and marketing property to exacerbate, alleviate or create inequalities within contemporary experiences of democratic citizenship. The full research team is as follows: Principal Investigator: Marianne Maeckelbergh (US case study); Four PhD researchers: Aleksandra Hall (UK case study), Marta Ill-Raga (Spain case study), Theodoros Karyotis (Greek case study), Seppe Malfait (Netherlands case study); Two postdoctoral researchers: Carlos Delclós (Comparative research, based at the Autonomous University of Barcelona) Christina Sakali (Cross-case comparative research).
Archived project
This volume arose from proceedings of the conference The Right to the City and Social Ecology—Towards Ecological and Democratic Cities, held in Thessaloniki 1–3 September, 2017. The conference was organized by the Transnational Institute of Social Ecology (TRISE). TRISE is an association of activists and intellectuals based in Europe, who are concerned with current socio-ecological crises. It was founded in Greece in 2013 and focuses on research, education, and training. The asso- ciation initiates, supports and facilitates research on social ecology, urban social movements, and the democratization of society. Historically, its inspi- ration can be traced to Vermont, US, where the Institute for Social Ecology was co-founded by Murray Bookchin and Dan Chodorkoff in 1974. At the heart of the organization’s mission lies the theory of social ecology. Multiple definitions of social ecology exist. However, TRISE largely follows the innovative philosophy of Murray Bookchin, as well as other writers and activists who developed his work. TRISE aims to foster and develop social ecological analysis and practice that can be adopted for the struggles to come. This book answers this call, exploring the contemporary discourse surrounding urban rights—the right to the city—and presents a selection of new essays on social ecology. This volume seeks to bring the ideas of social ecology into conversation with the worldwide call for the right to the city, thereby challenging and extending existing discussions on both topics in a fruitful cross-fertilization. Theories and practices need to be discovered, engaged with, and transformed in order to build an effective culture of resistance.