Thanavit Jirapanjawat

Thanavit Jirapanjawat
Monash University (Australia) · School of Biological Sciences, Clayton

Bachelor of Science (Honours)

About

18
Publications
3,026
Reads
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230
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Officer
August 2016 - December 2019
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
February 2012 - July 2016
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Major in Biology and minor in Chemistry and Microbiology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a gold standard method for the detection and quantification of pathogenic organisms. Standard qPCR is inexpensive, sensitive and highly specific to the pathogen of interest. While qPCR assays can be multiplexed to allow the detection of multiple organisms in one reaction, it is prohibitively labour i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Molecular hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are supersaturated in seawater relative to the atmosphere and hence are readily accessible energy sources for marine microbial communities. Yet while marine CO oxidation is well-described, it is unknown whether seawater communities consume H2. Here we integrated genome-resolved metagenomics, biogeoch...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Diverse microbial life has been detected in the cold desert soils of Antarctica once thought to be barren. Here, we provide metagenomic, biogeochemical, and culture-based evidence that Antarctic soil microorganisms are phylogenetically and functionally distinct from those in other soils and adopt various metabolic and ecological strate...
Article
Significance Termites are textbook examples of the “extended phenotype” given their ability to construct complex mounds and regulate environments. Here, we show that termites also control microbial composition and biogeochemical cycling in their mounds through their emissions of hydrogen. These emissions drive remarkable enrichments of mound bacter...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Multiple bacteria, viruses, protists, and helminths cause enteric infections that greatly impact human health and wellbeing. These enteropathogens are transmited via several pathways through human, animal, and environmental reservoirs. Individual qPCR assays have been extensively used to detect enteropathogens within these types of sam...
Article
Full-text available
Soil microorganisms globally are thought to be sustained primarily by organic carbon sources. Certain bacteria also consume inorganic energy sources such as trace gases, but they are presumed to be rare community members, except within some oligotrophic soils. Here we combined metagenomic, biogeochemical and modelling approaches to determine how so...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric trace gases such as dihydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) play important roles in microbial metabolism and biogeochemical cycles. Analysis of these gases at trace levels requires reliable storage of discrete samples of low volume. While commercial sampling vials such as Exetainers® have been tested for CH4 and other gr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Multiple bacteria, viruses, protists, and helminths cause enteric infections that greatly impact human health and wellbeing. These enteropathogens are transmitted via several pathways through human, animal, and environmental reservoirs. Individual quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays have been extensively used to detect enteropathogens within...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric trace gases such as dihydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) play important roles in microbial metabolism and biogeochemical cycles. Analysis of these gases at trace levels requires reliable storage of discrete samples of low volume. While commercial sampling vials such as Exetainers® have been tested for CH4 and other gr...
Article
Full-text available
Termite mounds have recently been confirmed to mitigate approximately half of termite methane (CH4) emissions, but the aerobic CH4 oxidising bacteria (methanotrophs) responsible for this consumption have not been resolved. Here, we describe the abundance, composition and CH4 oxidation kinetics of the methanotroph communities in the mounds of three...
Article
Full-text available
Most aerobic bacteria exist in dormant states within natural environments. In these states, they endure adverse environmental conditions such as nutrient starvation by decreasing metabolic expenditure and using alternative energy sources. In this study, we investigated the energy sources that support persistence of two aerobic thermophilic strains...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bacteria within aerated environments often exist within a variety of dormant forms. In these states, bacteria endure adverse environmental conditions such as organic carbon starvation by decreasing metabolic expenditure and using alternative energy sources. In this study, we investigated the energy sources that facilitate the persistence of the env...
Article
Full-text available
F420 is a microbial cofactor that mediates a wide range of physiologically important and industrially relevant redox reactions, including in methanogenesis and tetracycline biosynthesis. This deazaflavin comprises a redox-active isoalloxazine headgroup conjugated to a lactyloligoglutamyl tail. Here we studied the catalytic significance of the oligo...
Article
Full-text available
An unusual aspect of actinobacterial metabolism is the use of the redox cofactor F420. Studies have shown that actinobacterial F420H2-dependent reductases promiscuously hydrogenate diverse organic compounds in biodegradative and biosynthetic processes. These enzymes therefore represent promising candidates for next-generation industrial biocatalyst...
Article
A defining feature of mycobacterial redox metabolism is the use of an unusual deazaflavin cofactor, F420. This cofactor enhances the persistence of environmental and pathogenic mycobacteria, including after antimicrobial treatment, although the molecular basis for this remains to be understood. In this work, we explored our hypothesis that F420 enh...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Recent work has demonstrated that redox and energy homeostasis is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence. Multiple new antitubercular agents all operate through disrupting these processes, including the clinically approved bedaquiline and delamanid. Our work is focused on understanding the molecular basis of these processes and identifying novel drug targets. This research is focused on two many areas: (i) understanding the biochemistry and physiology of the unique redox cofactor F420, (ii) elucidating the role of DosR-regulated enzymes implicated in redox and energy homeostasis.