Tesfay Araya

Tesfay Araya
University of the Free State | ufs · Department of Soil- and Crop and Climate Sciences

PhD in Applied Biological Sciences

About

51
Publications
14,408
Reads
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842
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
University of Fort Hare
Position
  • Professor
September 2014 - August 2015
Fort Hare University
Position
  • Postdoctoral fellow in Soil Science
September 2005 - August 2014
Mekelle University
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Significant research has been conducted on the effects of soil salinity issue on agricultural productivity. However, limited consideration has been given to its critical effects on soil biogeochemistry (e.g., soil microorganisms, soil organic carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions), land desertification, and biodiversity loss. This article is ba...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The exotic Tamarix species, T. ramosissima and T. chinensis, were introduced into South Africa in the early 1900s reportedly either for ornamental or soil wind erosion control purposes in the mines. They are, however, currently invading several riparian ecosystems in the country and threatening its biodiversity and proper functioning. The...
Article
Full-text available
Soil and crop productivity cannot be maintained unless declining soil fertility is replenished. A three-year factorial experiment using a split-split-plot design, replicated three times, was used to evaluate the response of pH, electrical conductivity, exchangeable cations (Ca, Mg, K and Na), microbial biomass carbon, total nitrogen and total carbo...
Article
Conservation agriculture (CA) systems represent a set of three soil management principles that include minimal soil disturbance, permanent soil cover and crop rotations whereas the CA‐based systems in this study add the bed and furrow tillage structures as integral elements of CA. Studies on the effects of long‐term CA‐based systems on soil health...
Article
Conservation agriculture (CA) is believed to contribute to sustainable crop production. However, there are contrasting reports on its short-term effects on soil properties. An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of CA on bulk density (BD), porosity, mean weight diameter (MWD) and penetration resistance (PR) in a semiarid province of S...
Article
Full-text available
The severe limitation of agricultural land productivity induced by physical soil degradation has become a major concern in semiarid climates, especially in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. A randomized complete block design in a split-split-plot arrangement was used to evaluate the short-term (2012-2015) effects of tillage (no-till (NT) and...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impacts of agricultural practices on carbon stocks and CO 2 emission is imperative in order to recommend low emission strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of tillage, crop rotation, and residue management on soil CO 2 fluxes, carbon stock, soil temperature, and moisture in the semi-arid conditions...
Article
This study investigated, soil salinity and moisture content under the exotic Tamarix in the Olifants River, South Africa, where they predominantly occur. Soil electro-conductivity (EC) was mapped using the electromagnetic induction (EMI) device (EM38 sensor), in three transects laid along the river from as close to the water source outward towards...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation agriculture (CA) as a system is still evolving on many of the smallholder farms in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and questions on the impact of individual components and pathways toward adoption still require answers. A short-term study was conducted to investigate the effect of tillage, crop rotation, and crop residue management, including...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Haricot bean is primarily grown in Ethiopia for human consumption and export earnings. A market demand for haricot bean, both in the domestic and export market, has triggered the production of haricot bean in selected areas of Ethiopia though its production is constrained by several factors such as poor soil fertility and erratic rainfall...
Article
The distribution and relative importance of lepidopteran stem borers attacking maize and sorghum were investigated in farmers’ fields during the main cropping seasons of 2015 and 2016 across three main agro-climatic zones (ACZs) of eastern Ethiopia. Three stem borer species, namely Busseola fusca Fuller, Chilo partellus Swinhoe and Sesamia calamist...
Chapter
Full-text available
Many regions in the world are suffering from agricultural droughts and floods, two sides of the same coin. They result in shortage of available water for plant growth or accumulation of water on farm land that is normally not submerged, respectively. The incidence of droughts and floods is not only caused by extreme weather events, but also by an i...
Chapter
Farm productivity and food security in the coming years is undermined by intensive and repeated tillage (Chap. 26), complete crop residue removal at harvest, aftermath grazing in croplands, biomass burning, use of crop straw and animal dung for fuel, deforestation and monocropping. Recurrent food production shortages are commonly linked to periodic...
Chapter
Full-text available
Traditionally, livelihood security among smallholder farmers in Ethiopia is strongly dependent on rainfed agriculture, with which over 95% of the food is produced. Conventional soil cultivation practices, such as excessive tillage, overgrazing, and complete removal of crop residues at harvest leave the soil unprotected, and therefore trigger land d...
Article
Full-text available
A major problem faced by small-scale farmers in northern Ethiopia is reduced crop yield due to increasing soil degradation resulting from repeated tillage and inadequate agronomic management practices. These practices have left soils and rainfed crops susceptible to hazardous climatic events such as droughts. Sustainable farm practices such as mini...
Article
Full-text available
Soil acidification is a serious challenge and a major cause of declining soil and crop productivity in the Eastern parts of South Africa (SA). An incubation experiment investigated effects of different maize residue biochar rates on selected soil properties and soil loss in acidic Hutton soils. Biochar amendment rates were 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 1...
Article
Full-text available
Poor land use management and practice inhibit the growth and establishment of tree seedlings in dryland areas. We assessed arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM) status of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev. trees grown on different land uses. We quantified the growth and nutrient uptake of F. albida seedlings inoculated with AM from different sources. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Tree seedling establishment, survival and growth in dryland areas is greatly impacted by water, land use effects and soil nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can have a substantial effect on water and nutrient uptake by seedlings and are affected by nutrient application, water availability and inoculum source. In this study, w...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term in situ soil and water conservation experiments are rare in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in Eastern Africa. A long-term experiment was conducted (2005–2013) on a Vertisol to quantify the impacts of resource-conserving agriculture (RCA) on runoff, soil loss, soil fertility and crop productivity and economic profitability in northern Et...
Article
In situ water and soil conservation (WSC) practices are a promising intervention to improve rainwater management particularly in the semi-arid to dry subhumid tropics. This study applies a fully coupled surface-subsurface process based model (HydroGeoSphere) to simulate in detail rainwater partitioning as affected by two in situ WSC practices (terw...
Article
Conservation agriculture (CA) is often quoted as a beneficial resource-saving technique for dryland agriculture, but its large-scale implementation is frequently hindered by the lack of farmers’ acceptance. To date, few studies have investigated the impact of spatial factors, costs and benefits and regional agroecosystem differentiation on adoption...
Article
The use of the marasha ard plough for conservation agriculture in Northern Ethiopia Indigenous tillage systems are often undervalued in conservation agriculture (CA). In Ethiopia, since the 1970s there have been several attempts to develop and implement often major modifications to the marasha, the traditional ox-drawn ard plough, with the main ai...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation Agriculture (CA) aims at improving soil quality and crop yield whilst reducing runoff and topsoil erosion which raises the soil resilience to combat soil degradation. Different chemical, physical, and biological properties of a soil interact in complex ways that determine the crop productivity potential of the soil. Hence, a medium-ter...
Article
This study evaluates the practice of conservation agriculture (CA) in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (MZZ; 187 ha) in the North Ethiopian Highlands as a soil management technique for reducing soil loss and runoff, and assesses the consequences of future large-scale implementation on soil and hydrology at catchment-level. The study of such practice is im...
Article
Highlights ► We simulated implementation of conservation agriculture (CA) in the 187-ha May Zeg-zeg (MZZ) catchment in Ethiopia. ► EdGCM simulation predicts an increase in precipitation of more than 100 mm yr−1 by 2040. ► Annual runoff coefficients in MZZ would decrease from the current 30% to 19% after catchment-wide implementation of CA. ► Sheet...
Thesis
Full-text available
Conventional soil cultivation practices have resulted globally in land degradation. The main causes of cropland degradation in northern Ethiopia are long time introduced land management cultural practices with repeated plowing, complete removal of crop residue at harvest leaving no soil cover and aftermath overgrazing of the crop field. Conservatio...
Article
In the northern Ethiopian highlands, croplands yield extremely high volumes of storm runoff and are the major contributor to sediment load in the rivers. A medium-term tillage experiment was carried out (2005-2010) on a Vertisol to quantify changes in runoff, soil loss and crop yield clue to Conservation agriculture (CA) in the sub-humid May Zegzeg...
Article
The aim of conservation agriculture (CA) is to improve soil quality and crop yield whilst reducing runoff and topsoil erosion. An experiment was carried out in a rainfed field using a permanent raised bed planting system for 3 yr (2005–2007) in Adigudem, northern Ethiopia in order to evaluate the effect of CA on runoff, soil loss and crop yield. CA...
Article
Indigenous tillage systems are often undervalued in conservation agriculture (CA). In Ethiopia, since the 1970s there have been several attempts to develop and implement often major modifications to the marasha, the traditional ox-drawn ard plough, with the main aim of creating various types of surface depressions. The establishment of furrows and...
Chapter
Full-text available
Indigenous tillage systems are often undervalued in conservation agriculture (CA). In Ethiopia, since the 1970s there have been several attempts to develop and implement often major modifications to the marasha, the traditional ox-drawn ard plough, with the main aim of creating various types of surface depressions. The establishment of furrows and...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the northern Ethiopian highlands, croplands yield extremely high volumes of storm runoff and are the major contributor to sediment load in the rivers. A medium-term tillage experiment was carried out (2005 to 2010) on a Vertisol to quantify changes in runoff, soil loss and crop yield due to Conservation Agriculture (CA) in the sub-humid May Zegz...
Article
Full-text available
Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), of South American origin, is considered to be one of the world�s most serious invasive plants, invading Australia, Asia and Africa. As part of an international collaborative project, this study attempted to improve the understanding of the geographical distribution of P. hysterophorus in eastern and southern A...
Article
Full-text available
McConnachie AJ, Strathie LW, Mersie W, Gebrehiwot L, Zewdie K, Abdurehim A, Abrha B, Araya T, Asaregew F, Assefa F, Gebre-Tsadik R, Nigatu L, Tadesse B & Tana T (2011). Current and potential geographical distribution of the invasive plant Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae) in eastern and southern Africa. Weed Research 51, 71–84. Parthenium hyste...
Article
Full-text available
Field water conservation practices are a way forward to build resilience against drought through increasing productive green water and crop yield, while reducing runoff (blue water) and soil erosion. A long-term tillage experiment was carried out (2005 to 2011) on a Vertisol to quantify the impact of field water conservation practices on soil moist...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
To map the extent and distribution of the exotic Tamarix species in South Africa and evaluate their impacts on riparian plant biodiversity as well as on the physico-chemical properties of the soil they invade. The main objectives are: 1. To determine the plant species richness, tree and shrub density and herbaceous biomass of invaded riparian areas 2. To determine the distribution of alien Tamarix and native vascular plant species in riparian zones where Tamarix invasion is prevalent 3. To determine the size/stage class distribution of alien Tamarix species and native trees and shrubs 4. To compare vegetation distribution and composition changes in alien Tamarix species invaded areas overtime using remotely sensed data 5. To evaluate the influence of Tamarix species on selected soil chemical properties (pH, salinity, CEC and organic matter) and soil physical properties (texture, structure, bulk density and soil permeability). 6. To identity and map the soil types under the invasive Tamarix species in South Africa.