Terry L Jones

Terry L Jones
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo | Cal Poly · Department of Social Sciences

About

121
Publications
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3,031
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
852 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (121)
Article
Sea mussels and turban snails are among the most abundant mollusks recovered from central California middens. Experimental harvests of these and other shellfish have been conducted to help interpret archaeological findings, but methodological complications have plagued many of the early experiments. Here we report results of harvest experiments of...
Article
Indigenous people throughout North America were dramatically affected by the invasion of European colonizers. Growing evidence suggests that, among many strategies for survival and perseverance, increased sedentism was common; it often resulted from either forced resettlement or attempts to access European resources. We present artifactual, paleoet...
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Significance The idea of precipitous continent-wide population decline beginning ca. 1492 has long influenced ecological and social narratives of North America. We analyze the largest systematic dataset of mortality records ( n = 33,715 individuals) yet compiled across North America coupling archaeological and historic data to evaluate the nature a...
Article
The extinction of California’s flightless duck, Chendytes lawi, stands out in the faunal history of North America because it involved a marine animal that disappeared in the late Holocene, not in the terminal Pleistocene when humans arrived from Asia, nor with the more recent entry of Europeans and associated resource exploitation. Here we evaluate...
Article
The ethnographic literature of California has long attributed some measure of reduced mobility to nearly all of its Native societies, but methods for determining this measure for any given group have greatly varied. Treatment of sedentism in the archaeological literature has been approached from multiple theoretical perspectives, including those de...
Chapter
For nearly 50 years, a subset of California archaeology has been concerned with the possible effects of prehistoric hunting on indigenous fauna. This interest began in earnest in the late 1960s when Paul S. Martin proposed the Pleistocene overkill hypothesis in which he argued that the entire North American continent ca. 13,000 years ago was essent...
Article
Ancient Ocean Crossings: Reconsidering the Case for Contacts with the Pre-Columbian Americas. STEPHEN C. JETT. 2017. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa. xx + 508 pp. $49.95 (hardcover), ISBN 978-0-8173-1939-7. - Terry L. Jones
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Chendytes lawi, an extinct flightless diving anseriform from coastal California, was traditionally classified as a sea duck, tribe Mergini, based on similarities in osteological characters. We recover and analyze mitochondrial genomes of C. lawi and five additional Mergini species, including the extinct Labrador Duck, Camptorhyncus labradorius. Des...
Article
Ethnographic populations throughout Western North America relied on strategies and institutions to protect resources for exclusive use, though the degree of territorial defense varied significantly across the region. Attempts to explain this variation typically focus on the ecological contexts that promote economic defensibility, however, it is inc...
Article
Shellfish for the Celestial Empire: The Rise and Fall of Commercial Abalone Fishing in California. TODD J. BRAJE . 2016. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. xiv + 242 pp., 57 figures. $34.95 (paperback), ISBN 978-1-60781-496-2. - Terry L. Jones
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A robust collection of mammal, bird, fish, and shellfish remains from an 8,000-year residential sequence at Morro Bay, a small, isolated estuary on the central California coast, shows a strong focus on marine species during the Middle-Late Transition cultural phase (950–700 cal B.P.), which largely coincides with the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA)...
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Significance From warfare to homicide, lethal violence is an all too common aspect of the human experience, yet we still do not have a clear explanation of why individuals kill one another. We suggest the search for an answer should begin with an empirical understanding of where and when individuals are more prone to experience violence. Examining...
Article
California's Channel Islands: The Archaeology of Human-Environment Interactions. Jazwa Christopher S. and Perry Jennifer E. , editors. 2013. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. 204 pp. $65.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-60781-271-5. - Volume 79 Issue 4 - Terry L. Jones
Article
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Global patterns of ethnolinguistic diversity vary tremendously. Some regions show very little variation even across vast expanses, whereas others exhibit dense mosaics of different languages spoken alongside one another. Compared with the rest of Native North America, prehistoric California exemplified the latter. Decades of linguistic, genetic, an...
Article
The archaeological record represents a potentially critical source of information on past relationships between human hunters and populations of game animals. Archaeological research in the last 40–50 years has produced two alternative views on these relationships: one that Native people were knowledgeable, benevolent conservators of game and an al...
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All existing sea otter, Enhydra lutris, populations have suffered at least one historic population bottleneck stemming from the fur trade extirpations of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We examined genetic variation, gene flow, and population structure at five microsatellite loci in samples from five pre-fur trade populations throughout th...
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Driven to the brink of extinction during the nineteenth century commercial fur and oil trade, northern elephant seal (NES, Mirounga angustirostris) populations now exceed 100 000 animals in the northeast Pacific from Alaska to Baja California. Because little is known about the biogeography and ecology of NES prior to the mid-nineteenth century, we...
Chapter
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of longstanding speculation by fi shermen, biologists, and California Fish and Game repre-sentatives. Sea otters are a keystone predator in kelp forests along the central California coast, and they are voracious consumers of shellfi sh. Since their return from the brink of extinction early in the 20th century, their impact on shell-fi sh population...
Chapter
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In 2007 the discovery of pre-Columbian chicken bones from Chile provided the first conclusive evidence for prehistoric Polynesian contact with South America. When looking for further commensal data to address the issue of trans-Pacific contacts, we found a museum collection of human remains recovered from Mocha Island, a small island located approx...
Chapter
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We suggest that the most parsimonious explanation for the material, linguistic, biological, mythological, nautical, chronological, and physical anthropological evidence summarized in chapters 1–13 is that Polynesians made pre-Columbian landfalls in the New World. Further, based on this evidence, we identify three likely locations of contact: southe...
Article
Hildebrandt et al. offer this rather vitriolic challenge to our conclusions on the Diablo Canyon fauna in order to recast the data in favor of their view that major diachronic trends in western North American prehistory are the product of an increase in men's prestige hunting over time. Here we respond, first by discussing our view of the relations...
Article
Archaeological applications of behavioral ecology apply models developed for synchronic phenomena to diachronic trends. Some problems arise out of this mismatch, one of which involves distinguishing between functional and historical levels of explanation. Historical explanations attempt to outline the diachronic emergence or evolution of some behav...
Article
Three main hypotheses are commonly employed to explain diachronic variation in the relative abundance of remains of large terrestrial herbivores: (1) large prey populations decline as a function of anthropogenic overexploitation; (2) large prey tends to increase as a result of increasing social payoffs; and (3) proportions of large terrestrial prey...
Article
Seasonality determination using stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) analyses in archaeological mollusk shell has been largely limited to aquatic settings where one of the two factors that control shell δ18O – water δ18O (or salinity) and temperature – is assumed to be constant. Open coastal marine environments reflect the former situation, and tropical es...
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Guadalupe fur seals (Arctocephalus townsendi) were decimated by 19th century commercial sealers in the northeastern Pacific and thought to be extinct until 1928 when commercial fishermen caught two adult males at Isla de Guadalupe from a group of up to 60 adults and pups (Wedgeforth 1928, Huey 1930). These two animals were brought to the San Diego...
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Buchanan et al. (1) assert that the radiocarbon record from the United States and Canada does not support the extraterrestrial impact hypothesis, but their claims do not hold true for the California archaeological record. Fluted projectile points marking Paleoindian occupations have been reported from no fewer than 51 locations in California (2), a...
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A model of prehistoric marine mammal overexploitation advanced by Hildebrandt and Jones (1992) for the northeastern Pacific has been challenged by Colten (1995) and Colten and Arnold (1998) who argue that diachronic patterns in faunal remains from California’s Channel Islands reflect climatically-induced decline in marine productivity and local soc...
Article
In her recent article, "Credit Where Credit is Due: The History of the Chumash Oceangoing Plank Canoes," Jeanne Arnold questions our 2005 paper in which we suggested that a prehistoric contact event with Polynesians resulted in conveyance of the sewn-plank boat construction technique and a particular style of compound bone fishhook to the Chumash a...
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Sedimentary records from California's Northern Channel Islands and the adjacent Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) indicate intense regional biomass burning (wildfire) at the Ållerød–Younger Dryas boundary (∼13.0–12.9 ka) (All age ranges in this paper are expressed in thousands of calendar years before present [ka]. Radiocarbon ages will be identified and c...
Article
Of interest to D. L. True throughout his career was the California Milling Stone Horizon, the artifact complex dominated by handstones, millingslabs, and crude core tools most frequently associated with the early Holocene in southern California. The basic Milling Stone pattern, identified in 1929 by David Banks Rogers in the Santa Barbara Channel a...
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Inspired by Stine's [1994. Extreme and persistent drought in California and Patagonia during Mediaeval Time. Nature 369, 546–549.] findings from Mono Lake and Graumlich's [1993. A 1000-year record of temperature and precipitation in the Sierra Nevada. Quaternary Research 39, 249–255.] tree-ring study from the southern Sierra Nevada, California arch...
Article
Oxygen isotope determinations from 92 California mussel (Mytilus californianus) shells from ten archaeological sites in central coastal California show relatively stable seasonal harvesting patterns between 3600 CAL BP and historic contact (AD 1769). Coastal occupants harvested mussels nearly year-round and seem to have occupied individual resident...
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Decades ago the Diablo Canyon site (CA-SLO-2) on the central California mainland revealed one of the oldest and longest sequences (ca. 9400 radiocarbon years ago to contact) of coastal occupation on the shore of the northeastern Pacific. The artifacts from these important deposits were reported in detail by Greenwood (1972), but only a fraction of...
Article
Decades ago the Diablo Canyon site (CA-SLO-2) on the central California mainland revealed one of the oldest and longest sequences (ca. 9400 radiocarbon years ago to contact) of coastal occupation on the shore of the northeastern Pacific. The artifacts from these important deposits were reported in detail by Greenwood (1972), but only a fraction of...
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Bones of the flightless sea duck (Chendytes lawi) from 14 archaeological sites along the California coast indicate that humans hunted the species for at least 8,000 years before it was driven to extinction. Direct ¹⁴C dates on Chendytes bones show that the duck was exploited on the southern California islands as early as ≈11,150–10,280 calendar yea...
Data
Sedimentary records from California's Northern Channel Islands and the adjacent Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) indicate intense regional biomass burning (wildfire) at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (~13.0-12.9 ka) (All age ranges in this paper are expressed in thousands of calendar years before present [ka]. Radiocarbon ages will be identified and c...
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Anthropologist Terry Jones of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo has evidence suggesting prehistoric human hunters drove a flightless duck to extinction about 4,000 years ago. His theory is based on a 10,000-year history of shell and bone refuse, and other remnants of human settlement, excavated in the 1960s during the construction of the Diablo Canyon nucle...
Article
The earliest archaeological record from California shows a dramatic unconformity or cultural hiatus between the terminal Pleistocene and the early Holocene. Clovis-like fluted projectile points which mark initial human colonization ca. 13,300-12,900 cal BP, are relatively common and have been found throughout the state, but almost exclusively as is...
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In several recent, and highly provocative papers, McGuire and Hildebrandt (Hildebrandt and McGuire 2002, 2003; McGuire and Hildebrandt 2005) have helped introduce costly signaling theory into American archaeology. While their efforts are commendable, we feel that their reinterpretations of western North American prehistory overstate the likely infl...
Article
The objectives of the Diablo Canyon Archaeology project were to (1) refine the dating of archaeological sites CA-SLO-2 and CA-SLO-585; (2) identify the mammal, bird, and fish bones from these sites; (3) employ the resulting temporally controlled faunal matrix to improve understanding of California's earliest coastal inhabitants and (4) address issu...
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As the focus of intense debate concerning the possible effects of environmental variability on Native populations, the Middle-Late Transition (MLT) is an exceptionally important period in California prehistory. Recent salvage excavations at the Coon Creek Site (CA-SLO-9) on the San Luis Obispo County coast revealed a single, highly discrete compone...
Article
While we appreciate Atholl Anderson's willingness to consider transoceanic diffusion as a viable possibility, he misrepresents parts of our argument and ignores others, particularly the linguistics that suggest that the Chumash and Gabrieliño borrowed the technique of sewn-plank construction and words related to that technique--not the word for boa...
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While the prevailing theoretical orthodoxy of North American archaeology overwhelmingly discourages consideration of transoceanic cultural diffusion, linguistic and archaeological evidence appear to indicate at least one instance of direct cultural contact between Polynesia and southern California during the prehistoric era. Three words used to ref...
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Eleven Olivella biplicata spire-lopped shell beads from six sites located 250–365 km inland from the Pacific coast of southern California produced AMS dates between 11,200 and 7860 CAL BP. Olivella shell beads were well-documented items of prestige and media of exchange in Native California, and recovery of these examples from inland contexts indic...
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An isolated fluted projectile point found in Nipomo (San Luis Obispo County, California) about 30 years ago was recently brought to the attention of the local archaeological community. Made from Monterey chert, the specimen exhibits single flute scars that extend about three quarters of the way up both faces, although it also shows clear evidence o...
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We describe linguistic evidence for at least one episode of prehistoric contact between Polynesia and Native California, proposing that a borrowed Proto-Central Eastern Polynesian lexical compound was realized as Chumashan tomol 'plank canoe' and its dialect variants. Similarly, we suggest that the Gabrielino borrowed two Polynesian forms to design...
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As stated in our original paper (Jones et al. 2002) the Cross Creek site is not of sufficient antiquity to challenge Clovis for temporal priority in western North America, but it pushes the age of the California Milling Stone culture back 2,000 years earlier than previous estimates. The Milling Stone culture and coastal adapations on the southern C...
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A technique involving microscopic examination of otolith growth zones has been commonly used by archaeologists along the coast of California to estimate season-of-capture of prehistoric fishes and to infer the season of site use. A test of otolith edge analysis techniques was performed on modern otoliths by estimating season-of-capture for otoliths...
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Recent excavations tit the Cross Creek site (CA-SLO-1797) on the central coast of California revealed stratigraphically discrete midden component dating between ca. 8350 and 7700 cal B.C., making it the oldest mainland shell midden on the west coast of North America. A large recovery volume revealed an assemblage dominated by grinding implements (h...
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Meis1 (Myeloid Ecotropic viral Integration Site 1) is a homeobox gene that was originally isolated as a common site of viral integration in myeloid tumors of the BXH-2 recombinant inbred mice strain. We previously isolated a Xenopus homolog of Meis1 (Xmeis1). Here we show that Xmeis1 may play a significant role in neural crest development. In devel...
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Archaeological research began at Big Creek in 1983 with the first of four summer field classes offered by UC Santa Cruz and UC Davis. For the most part, this was the first systematic research to be undertaken in the South Coast Range or on the Sur coast, and certainly the first of any consequence in the Big Creek drainage. Before 1983, archaeologis...
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Occupied from ca. 7040 B.C. to A.D. 1400, the Eel Point Site (CA-SCLI-43) on San Clemente Island, California represents one of the longest sequences of near-continuous marine resource exploitation on the west coast of North America. Faunal remains suggest transitions from heavy exploitation of fur seals and sea lions during the early Holocene, to i...
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Rivers and Jones (1993) reported the locations of 21 place names in the upper San Antonio Valley and adjacent coast of Monterey County, California, that were noted by Salinan speakers in John Peabody Harrington's field notes from 1922 to 1932. Surface reconnaissance and review of recently completed archaeological survey reports have led to the iden...
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Review of late Holocene paleoenvironmental and cultural sequences from four regions of western North America show striking correlations between drought and changes in subsistence, population, exchange, health, and interpersonal violence during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (A.D. 800-1350). While ultimate causality is difficult to identify in the ar...
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