Terry Burke

Terry Burke
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Animal and Plant Sciences

PhD

About

659
Publications
90,180
Reads
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26,333
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1998 - present
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Professor of Molecular Ecology
January 1984 - December 1998
University of Leicester

Publications

Publications (659)
Article
Full-text available
Offspring of older parents in many species have decreased longevity, a faster ageing rate and lower fecundity than offspring born to younger parents. Biomarkers of ageing, such as telomeres, that tend to shorten as individuals age, may provide insight into the mechanisms of such parental age effects. Parental age may be associated with offspring te...
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions frequently underlie major phenotypic variation maintained by divergent selection within and between sexes. Here we examine whether and how intralocus conflicts contribute to balancing selection stabilizing an autosomal inversion polymorphism in the ruff Calidris pugnax. In this lekking shorebird, three male mating morphs (Ind...
Article
Full-text available
Background The gut microbiome (GM) can influence many biological processes in the host, impacting its health and survival, but the GM can also be influenced by the host’s traits. In vertebrates, Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes play a pivotal role in combatting pathogens and are thought to shape the host’s GM. Despite this—and the docum...
Article
Full-text available
In socially monogamous species, extra‐pair paternity (EPP) is predicted to increase variance in male reproductive success beyond that resulting from genetic monogamy, thus increasing the ‘opportunity for selection’ (maximum strength of selection that can act on traits). This prediction is challenging to investigate in wild populations because lifet...
Article
Full-text available
Background The vertebrate gut microbiome (GM) can vary substantially across individuals within the same natural population. Although there is evidence linking the GM to health in captive animals, very little is known about the consequences of GM variation for host fitness in the wild. Here, we explore the relationship between faecal microbiome dive...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: The vertebrate gut microbiome (GM) can vary substantially across individuals within the same natural population. Although there is evidence linking the GM to health in captive animals, very little is known about the consequences of GM variation for host fitness in the wild. Here, we explore the relationship between faecal microbiome div...
Preprint
1.Environmental conditions experienced during early life may have long-lasting effects on later-life phenotypes and fitness. Individuals experiencing poor early-life conditions may suffer subsequent fitness constraints. Alternatively, individuals may use a strategic ‘Predictive Adaptive Response’ (PAR), whereby they respond – in terms of physiology...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: The gut microbiome (GM) can influence many biological processes in the host, impacting its health and survival, but the GM can also be influenced by the host’s traits. In vertebrates, Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes play a pivotal role in combatting pathogens and are thought to shape the host’s GM. However, despite this - a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions frequently underlie major phenotypic variation maintained by divergent selection within and between sexes. Here we examine whether and how intralocus conflicts contribute to balancing selection stabilizing an autosomal inversion polymorphism in the ruff Calidris pugnax. In this lekking shorebird, three male mating morphs (Ind...
Article
Full-text available
Telomeres have been advocated to be important markers of biological age in evolutionary and ecological studies. Telomeres usually shorten with age and shortening is frequently associated with environmental stressors and increased subsequent mortality. Telomere lengthening – an apparent increase in telomere length between repeated samples from the s...
Article
Full-text available
Early-life environmental conditions can provide a source of individual variation in life-history strategies and senescence patterns. Conditions experienced in early life can be quantified by measuring telomere length, which can act as a biomarker of survival probability in some species. Here, we investigate whether seasonal changes, weather conditi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding where genetic variation exists, and how it influences fitness within populations is important from an evolutionary and conservation perspective. Signatures of past selection suggest that pathogen‐mediated balancing selection is a key driver of immunogenetic variation, but studies tracking contemporary evolution are needed to help reso...
Preprint
Full-text available
Telomeres have been advocated to be important markers of biological age in evolutionary and ecological studies. Telomeres usually shorten with age, and shortening is frequently associated with environmental stressors and increased subsequent mortality. Telomere lengthening – an apparent increase in telomere length between repeated samples from the...
Article
Understanding individual variation in fitness‐related traits requires separating the environmental and genetic determinants. Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of chromosomes that are thought to be a biomarker of senescence as their length predicts mortality risk and reflect the physiological consequences of environmental conditions. The rel...
Article
Full-text available
Individual variation in telomere length is predictive of health and mortality risk across a range of species. However, the relative influence of environmental and genetic variation on individual telomere length in wild populations remains poorly understood. Heritability of telomere length has primarily been calculated using parent–offspring regress...
Article
Full-text available
Offspring from elderly parents often have lower survival due to parental senescence. In cooperatively breeding species, where offspring care is shared between breeders and helpers, the alloparental care provided by helpers is predicted to mitigate the impact of parental senescence on offspring provisioning and, subsequently, offspring survival. We...
Preprint
Early-life environmental conditions can provide a source of individual variation in life-history strategies and senescence patterns. Conditions experienced in early life can be quantified by measuring telomere length, which can act as a biomarker of survival probability. Here, we investigate whether seasonal changes, weather conditions, and group s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding where and how genetic variation is maintained within populations is important from an evolutionary and conservation perspective. Signatures of past selection suggest that pathogen-mediated balancing selection is a key driver of immunogenetic variation, but studies tracking contemporary evolution are needed to help resolve the evolutio...
Article
Full-text available
1. The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long‐term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the w...
Article
Behavioral traits are considered animal personality traits when individuals differ consistently in their expression across time and across context. Here, we test this idea on three metrics derived from social interaction networks (strength, betweenness, closeness). Using experimental data from house sparrows in captive populations, and observationa...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Understanding the structure and variability of adaptive loci such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is a primary research goal for evolutionary and conservation genetics. Typically, classical MHC genes show high polymorphism and are under strong balancing selection, as their products trigger the adaptive immune respon...
Preprint
Full-text available
The integration and synthesis of the data in different areas of science is drastically slowed and hindered by a lack of standards and networking programmes. Long-term studies of individually marked animals are not an exception. These studies are especially important as instrumental for understanding evolutionary and ecological processes in the wild...
Preprint
Individual variation in telomere length is predictive of health and mortality risk across a range of species. However, the relative influence of environmental and genetic variation on individual telomere length in wild populations remains poorly understood. In previous studies, heritability of telomere length has primarily been calculated using par...
Article
Full-text available
Extra‐pair paternity (EPP) is often linked to male age in socially monogamous vertebrates, i.e. older males are more likely to gain EPP and less likely to be cuckolded. However, whether this occurs because males improve at gaining paternity as they grow older, or because ‘higher quality’ males that live longer are preferred by females, has rarely b...
Article
Full-text available
Delineating conservation units is a complex and often controversial process that is particularly challenging for highly vagile species. Here, we reassess population genetic structure and identify those populations of highest conservation value in the threatened snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus, Cassin, 1858), a partial migrant shorebird endemic to...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies on sexual size dimorphism address proximate and functional questions related to adults, but sexual size dimorphism usually develops during ontogeny and developmental trajectories of sexual size dimorphism are poorly understood. We studied three bird species with variation in adult sexual size dimorphism: black coucals (females 69% heav...
Article
Full-text available
1.The longitudinal study of populations is a core tool for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes. Long‐term studies typically collect samples repeatedly over individual lifetimes and across generations. These samples are then analysed in batches (e.g. qPCR‐plates) and clusters (i.e. group of batches) over time in the laboratory. Howev...
Preprint
Understanding individual variation in fitness-related traits requires separating the environmental and genetic determinants. Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of chromosomes that are thought to be a biomarker of senescence as their length predicts mortality risk and reflect the physiological consequences of environmental conditions. The rel...
Technical Report
Full-text available
As there is no agreed national list of species of socio-economic and/or cultural value for Scotland, a set of criteria for selecting species has been developed. These include: • Species prioritised for conservation value • Species identified as being culturally important • Species providing important ecosystem services • Game species • Species coll...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Aichi Target 13 (T13) focuses on the conservation of genetic diversity. • Major challenges in implementing T13 are that the type of genetic diversity to conserve is not clearly defined, and that key issues in genetic conservation vary across different sectors (e.g., forestry vs agriculture vs other species of socio-economic importance). • In Scotla...
Article
Full-text available
The classical class I and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play crucial roles in immune responses to infectious pathogens and vaccines as well as being important for autoimmunity, allergy, cancer and reproduction. These classical MHC genes are the most polymorphic known, with roughly 10,000 alleles in humans. In chic...
Article
Full-text available
In species with biparental care, behavioral coordination in the provisioning of the progeny is hypothesized to increase the number of offspring that survive to independence. Coordination is often quantified by two metrics, alternation and synchrony. Turn-taking (leading to an alternation pattern) can result when one parent's investment strategy is...
Article
Full-text available
Theory predicts that individuals behave altruistically towards their relatives. Hence, some form of kin recognition is useful for individuals to optimize their behavior. In species that display bi-parental care and are subject to extra-pair matings, kin recognition theoretically can allow cuckolded fathers to reduce their parental investment, and t...
Preprint
The role of sexual selection in natural populations has long been the subject of debate in evolutionary biology. Ornaments are sexually selected traits, which means they should vary within a population, have a genetic basis, and be associated with fitness. Despite evidence of ornaments meeting these criteria, evolutionary responses to sexual select...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary theory predicts that females seek extra‐pair fertilisations from high‐quality males. In socially monogamous bird species, it is often old males that are most successful in extra‐pair fertilisations. Adaptive models of female extra‐pair mate choice suggest that old males may produce offspring of higher genetic quality than young males b...
Article
Full-text available
The leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) in humans encodes many receptors with immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) extracellular domains, including the killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) expressed on natural killer (NK) cells among others, the leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs) expressed on myeloid and B cells, and an Fc receptor (FcR), all of which have impor...
Preprint
Full-text available
Offspring from elderly parents often have a lower survival probability because of parental senescence. In cooperatively breeding species, alloparental care provided by helpers is predicted to mitigate age-dependent declines in parental performance. We tested this prediction in the facultatively cooperative-breeding Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus...
Preprint
Full-text available
Behavioural traits are considered animal personality traits when individuals differ consistently in trait expression across time and context. Previous research has primarily focused on the shy-bold continuum, with research on sociability as potential proxy for animal personality traits only recently being considered. Here, we test the hypothesis th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Evolutionary theory predicts that females seek extra-pair fertilisations from high-quality males. In socially monogamous bird species, it is often old males that are most successful in extra-pair fertilisations. Adaptive models of female extra-pair mate choice suggest that old males may produce offspring of higher genetic quality than young males b...
Article
Full-text available
Within socially monogamous breeding systems, levels of extra-pair paternity can vary not only between species, populations, and individuals, but also across time. Uncovering how different extrinsic conditions (ecological, demographic, and social) influence this behavior will help shed light on the factors driving its evolution. Here, we simultaneou...
Article
Full-text available
Colour polymorphisms play a key role in sexual selection and speciation, yet the mechanisms that generate and maintain them are not fully understood. Here, we use genomic and transcriptomic tools to identify the precise genetic architecture and evolutionary history of a sex-linked colour polymorphism in the Gouldian finch Erythrura gouldiae that is...
Preprint
Full-text available
Variation in individual life histories, and physiology, determines the rates at which new life is generated (reproduction) and lost (death) in a population. Studying the demography of deaths thus reveals fundamental aspects of the biology of individuals within a population. We studied mortality senescence, the increase in mortality rate with age, i...
Article
Full-text available
Helping by group members is predicted to lead to delayed senescence by affecting the trade-off between current reproduction and future survival for dominant breeders. Here we investigate this prediction in the Seychelles warbler, Acrocephalus sechellensis, in which mainly female subordinate helpers (both co-breeders and non-breeding helpers) often...
Preprint
Full-text available
Theory predicts that individuals behave altruistically towards their relatives. Hence, some form of kin recognition is useful for individuals to optimize their behaviour. In species displaying bi-parental care and subject to extra-pair matings, kin recognition theoretically allows cuckolded fathers to reduce their parental investment, and thus opti...
Article
Full-text available
In cooperatively breeding species, care provided by helpers may affect the dominant breeders’ investment trade‐offs between current and future reproduction. By negatively compensating for such additional care, breeders can reduce costs of reproduction and improve their own chances of survival. Alternatively, helper care can be additive to that of d...
Preprint
The social environment can influence phenotypes through indirect genetic effects (IGEs), whereby genetic variance among interacting individuals explains some of the phenotypic variance. Empirical studies of wild populations often ignore IGEs especially among unrelated individuals, probably due to data limitations. This is problematic because IGEs c...
Preprint
The longitudinal study of populations is a core tool for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes. These studies typically collect samples over individual lifetimes and across multiple generations, building up a continuously growing biobank from which samples are then analysed in clusters over time in the laboratory. To ensure data are c...
Article
Full-text available
The status signalling hypothesis aims to explain within-species variation in ornamentation by suggesting that some ornaments signal dominance status. Here, we use multilevel meta-analytic models to challenge the textbook example of this hypothesis, the black bib of male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We conducted a systematic review, and obtai...
Article
Full-text available
Movement of individuals, or their genes, can influence eco-evolutionary processes in structured populations. We have limited understanding of the extent to which spatial behavior varies among groups and individuals within populations. Here, we use genetic pedigree reconstruction in a long-term study of European badgers (Meles meles) to characterize...
Preprint
Full-text available
Colour polymorphisms play a key role in sexual selection and speciation, yet the mechanisms that generate and maintain them are not fully understood. We therefore used genomic and transcriptomic tools to identify the precise genetic architecture and evolutionary history of a sex-linked colour polymorphism in the Gouldian finch Erythrura gouldiae th...