Terri Souster

Terri Souster
UiT The Arctic University of Norway · Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics

Doctor of Philosophy
Post Doctoral Researcher at The Arctic University of Norway. Cumulative stressors on Arctic marine ecosystems

About

13
Publications
3,859
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
270
Citations
Introduction
Currently working on benthic blue carbon data for the coastal shallows on the Antarctic Peninsula and The Arctic's Barents Sea. I am a self-motivated, independent and conscientious marine scientist with extensive research experience who works well, both independently, and within a team. My research interests are biodiversity, physiology and ecology. I have worked as a marine biologist for the past 12 years. During this time I have become competent in GIS and multivariate statistical analysis and

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
The importance of cold-water blue carbon as biological carbon pumps that sequester carbon into ocean sediments is now being realised. Most polar blue carbon research to date has focussed on deep water, yet the highest productivity is in the shallows. This study measured the functional biodiversity and carbon standing stock accumulated by shallow-wa...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon-rich habitats can provide powerful climate mitigation if meaningful protection is put in place. We attempted to quantify this around the Tristan da Cunha archipelago Marine Protected Area. Its shallows (<1000 m depth) are varied and productive. The 5.4 km2 of kelp stores ~60 tonnes of carbon (tC) and may export ~240 tC into surrounding depth...
Article
Full-text available
Unprecedented and dramatic transformations are occurring in the Arctic in response to climate change, but academic, public, and political discourse has disproportionately focussed on the most visible and direct aspects of change, including sea ice melt, permafrost thaw, the fate of charismatic megafauna, and the expansion of fisheries. Such narrati...
Article
The flapper skate, Dipturus intermedius (Parnell, 1837), is the largest of all European skate and rays (Superorder: Batoidea). It is found in coastal waters of the European continental shelf and slopes in the North-East (NE) Atlantic. With the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species classification of ‘common skate’ as Critically Endangered, and th...
Article
Full-text available
The flow of carbon from atmosphere to sediment fauna and sediments reduces atmospheric CO 2 , which in turn reduces warming. Here, during the Changing Arctic Ocean Seafloor programme, we use comparable methods to those used in the Antarctic (vertical, calibrated camera drops and trawl-collected specimens) to calculate the standing stock of zoobenth...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cite this article: Souster TA, Barnes DKA, Hopkins J. 2020 Variation in zoobenthic blue carbon in the Arctic's Barents Sea shelf sediments. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 378: 20190362. http://dx.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As oceans warm, reducing the extent of sea-ice and-ice shelves, increased carbon capture by phytoplankton and storage by southern polar benthos (sea bed organisms), is potentially the largest negative feedback on climate change. Teasing apart biological processes within and between geographic regions is vital to our understanding of global carbon c...
Article
Full-text available
The waters of the Southern Ocean exhibit extreme seasonality in primary production, with marine life living below 0 °C for much of the year. The metabolic cold adaptation (MCA) hypothesis suggests that polar species need elevated basal metabolic rates to enable activity in such cold which should result in higher metabolic rates, or at least rates s...
Article
Full-text available
Juvenile stages are often thought to be less resistant to thermal challenges than adults, yet few studies make direct comparisons using the same methods between different life history stages. We tested the resilience of juvenile stages compared to adults in 4 species of Antarctic marine invertebrate over 3 different rates of experimental warming. T...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and human activities are expected to have a major impact on the structure and functioning of marine ecosystems and the biogeochemical cycles they mediate in the coming years. Here we describe time series measurements of biogenic bromocarbons (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) collected in coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula which is on...
Article
Full-text available
Regeneration of arms in brittle stars is thought to proceed slowly in low temperature environments. Here a survey of natural arm damage and arm regeneration rates is documented in the Antarctic brittle star Ophiura crassa. This relatively small ophiuroid, a detritivore found amongst red macroalgae, displays high levels of natural arm damage and rep...
Article
Full-text available
The West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a hotspot of recent rapid regional warming and ice loss. The WAP sea surface freezes each winter to form a `fast-ice' skin that can reduce iceberg drift and collisions between their keels and the sea bed, in what is termed scouring. Scouring disturbance is thus inversely correlated with fast-ice duration. We ex...
Article
In recent decades, the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) has warmed more rapidly than anywhere else in the Southern Hemisphere. Associated with this, there has been a marked shortening of the sea ice season, a retreat of the majority of glaciers, and an increase in precipitation. Each of these changes in the freshwater system has the potential to exer...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I was hoping you could help me with a quick stats query
I have species richness data from 2011, 2 factors season and depth and I have plotted the data on a graph with +/- SD (figure attached).
Looking at the figure looks to me there is no significant difference in depth or season.
However, I wanted to run a GLM to test for difference but I can not get the data normalised, I have tried multiple transformations and the data are still not normally distributed (Attached minitab file with the data). The transformations did not even allow me to get the data to being close to normalisation as I appreciate ANOVA is a robust test.
I then thought I would put the data into PRIMER and did a fourth root transformation, resemblance matrix and then ran a 2 way crossed ANOSIM which gave me the result of Season ANOSIM R = 0.092 P < 0.001 Depth ANOSIM R = 0.507 P < 0.001 which says that north season and depth are significantly different (Right?)
which is not what I was expecting or my figure shows so now I am thinking I have either done something wrong or misunderstood something. I have chatted this through with a couple of work colleagues but we are not getting anywhere and I was hoping you could have a look for me (PRIMER FILE WITH DATA ATTACHED).

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Sub-Antarctic Islands, unlike the Antarctic continent, are typically managed by individual countries and don’t fall under a treaty system. As a consequence, science coordination is less well-developed in the region than in the Antarctic Treaty area. Moreover, the significance of the islands themselves are frequently overlooked in global discussions on climate change in polar environments. To address important knowledge gaps and scientific priorities for the sub-Antarctic and pave the way for increased research coordination, the South Atlantic Research Institute (SAERI) organised a Symposium on Sub-Antarctic connections and climate change hosted at Wilton Park in October 2021, ahead of COP26. Symposium discussions led to the creation of a sub-Antarctic blue carbon and natural archives (such as ice-core, corals, peat-core and fjord geology) network of ~30 researchers working in the region, across career stages, nationalities and disciplines - to elucidate our understanding of blue carbon in the past, present and future.
Project
MarPAMM is an environment project to develop tools for monitoring and managing a number of protected coastal marine environments in Ireland, Northern Ireland and Western Scotland. It will be completed by 31 March 2022. It is a cross-border project because many marine species and habitats do not abide by administrative borders. To manage mobile species and border areas requires cooperation. MarPAMM partners will collect data on the abundance, distribution and movement of marine protected species and habitats. These data will help us produce new habitat maps and develop models for a range of species, including connectivity assessment for species with mobile life stages.