Terrence D. Hill

Terrence D. Hill
University of Texas at San Antonio | UTSA · Department of Sociology

Ph.D
I publish a lot and build successful programs. I am not a machine.

About

177
Publications
55,728
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5,379
Citations
Citations since 2017
83 Research Items
3257 Citations
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Introduction
My research examines social inequalities in health and human suffering. To date, I have published over 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts. My publications appear in a range of journals like the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Social Science & Medicine, The Journals of Gerontology, The Gerontologist, American Journal of Public Health, Labour Economics, and Social Work. According to Google Scholar, my work has been cited over 7,000 times.
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - May 2020
The University of Arizona
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 2013 - July 2014
University of Utah
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 2010 - May 2013
Florida State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2001 - May 2006
University of Texas at Austin
Field of study
  • Sociology

Publications

Publications (177)
Article
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Background: In this paper, we integrate theory and research from sociology, psychology, and political science to develop and test a mediation model that helps to explain why political conservatism is often associated with pandemic behaviors and lifestyles that do not comply with public health recommendations for COVID-19. Methods: Using national da...
Article
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Objective. We examine the association between college education and the number of medications used/misused in the past year. We also consider the possibility of differential socioeconomic returns to health for racial/ethnic minorities. Methods. The data come from the 2015-2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (n = 144,589). Results. In accord...
Article
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We contribute to our understanding of the social epidemiology of intimate partner violence (IPV) by developing a mediation model that frames IPV as an outcome of male sexual dysfunction (performance anxiety and erectile dysfunction) and the mechanisms of masculine discrepancy stress (the perceived failure to conform to internalized normative expect...
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We employ national cross-sectional survey data from the 2021 Crime, Health, and Politics Survey (n = 1,578 to 1,735) to model traditional cigarette and e-cigarette use as a function of religious affiliation, general religiosity, biblical literalism, religious struggles, and the sense of divine control. Although the odds of abstaining from cigarette...
Article
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Over the past four decades, studies have consistently shown that regular attendance at religious services is associated with better mental and physical health. At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many congregations paused in-person religious services and moved their worship rituals online. The ways that churches have responded to the threat of i...
Article
Open Access: ttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-023-01737-3 This first issue of JORH for 2023 considers (1) the ministry of chaplains, (2) Judaism, (3) the people of war-torn Ukraine, (4) the ongoing saga of COVID-19 and, on a happier note, (5) we celebrate a belated jubilee by presenting a bibliometric analysis of the Journal of Religion and Health (1...
Article
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Purpose: To examine the associations between gender role discrepancy (non-conformity to socially prescribed masculine gender role norms) and discrepancy stress (distress arising from this discrepancy) on COVID-19 prevention behaviors among men, and the potential moderating effects of race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and income on these relation...
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Objective: In the current study, we seek to shed new light on the role of religion in American gun culture by considering whether images people hold of God affect the probability of gun ownership and the experience of empowerment through guns for religious Americans (i.e., the extent to which owners derive security, identity, and status from their...
Chapter
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Although body mass is an important indicator of population health, this outcome has been surprisingly understudied in the religion and health literature. In an effort to advance the social epidemiology of body mass, we considered the nature and extent of the association between religion and body mass in population-based studies of adults conducted...
Article
This final issue of JORH for 2022 revisits the topics of (1) cancer, (2) religious philosophy, and (3) uniquely collates a number of papers discussing the theme of death and dying—which seems an appropriate topic given the conclusion and celebration of life for one of the most internationally admired monarchs, Queen Elizabeth II (1926–2022). Lastly...
Article
This article is Open Access via: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-022-01648-9 Abstract: In this fifth issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, four key themes are revisited: (1) mental health, (2) Islam, (3) various clinical issues relating to religiosity and/or spirituality and (4) the ongoing concerns of COVID-19.
Article
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Although studies show that masculine discrepancy stress (i.e., the intrapsychic strain associated with failing to meet internalized masculine ideals) is associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, little is known about the processes underlying this association. There may be other social psychological constructs at play that explai...
Article
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Although a vibrant interdisciplinary literature has extensively documented the importance of quality sleep for health and longevity, many Americans struggle with sleep disorders. One factor which has received far less research attention to date in predicting sleep quality is religion/spirituality. The current study uses nationally representative da...
Article
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Over the past two decades, researchers have worked to make sense of the fact that Black Americans tend to exhibit similar or better mental health profiles relative to their White counterparts. In this study, we extend previous research by proposing and testing a new potential explanation of the Black-White mental health paradox: the dark side of re...
Article
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In this fourth issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, four key themes are explored: (1) religious and spiritual issues in China, (2) gender-related issues affecting communities, couples, women and men, (3) a multitude of philosophical perspectives regarding medicine, science, health and religion, (4) and an array of new or adapted re...
Article
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Given that sexual minorities have been historically stigmatized within institutions of religion, they may be less likely to exhibit any health benefits from religious participation. In this paper, we use data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to test whether the effects of religious affiliation (be...
Article
Are conservative Protestant men especially insecure about their sexual prowess and masculinity? A recent state-level analysis by Perry and Whitehead (2021) suggests that they are. In this study, we use national data from the 2021 Crime, Health, and Politics Survey (CHAPS) to formally test whether conservative Protestant men are more concerned with...
Article
Article Open Access: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-022-01586-6 Abstract: Four key themes are explored in this third issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022: (1) the lead topic for this issue considers the work and spiritual care provided by nurses, which is followed by a series of articles on the subject areas of (2) diabetes and (3)...
Article
In this paper, we test whether the association between income inequality and life expectancy is mediated and moderated by policy liberalism in US states for the years 2000-2014. Two-way fixed-effects models with autocorrelation-corrected standard errors show: (1) income inequality is negatively associated with policy liberalism and life expectancy;...
Article
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(Open Acess) "Chaplaincy, Cancer, Aged Care and COVID-19". Carey, Cohen & Aiken et al.(April 2022), Journal of Religion and Health 61 (2), 921–928 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-022-01546-0 Four key topics are explored in this second issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022. Following a condemnation of the Russian invasion of Uk...
Article
Numerous studies have demonstrated that neighborhood context contributes to variations in morbidity and mortality. This body of work includes a burgeoning literature that links adverse neighborhood characteristics (e.g., neighborhood poverty and perceptions of disorder and dangerousness) with poorer sleep outcomes. During the COVID-19 pandemic, man...
Article
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Free Access: Carey, L.B., Koenig, H.G., Cohen, J. et al. Mental Health, Clinical Practice and COVID-19. J Relig Health 61, 1–5 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-022-01501-z Three topics are explored in this first issue of the Journal of Religion and Health for 2022, namely: (1) mental health and religion, (2) clinical practice issues and the r...
Article
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In this paper, we document the social patterning of recent gun purchases to advance a contemporary social epidemiology of the pandemic arms race. We employ cross-sectional survey data from the 2020 Health, Ethnicity and Pandemic Study, which included a national sample of 2,709 community-dwelling adults living in the United States. We use binary log...
Article
Objective Although there is widespread speculation about guns helping people to sleep better, this idea has only recently faced empirical scrutiny. We test whether people who own guns tend to exhibit healthier sleep outcomes than people who do not own guns and whether the association between community stress and sleep is less pronounced for people...
Article
We consider the association between state political ideology and population mobility during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We use first-party geo-behavioral data to estimate the average distance traveled by approximately 15,000,000 devices over ten weeks (February 24, 2020 to April 27, 2020). Regression models with state clustered robust stan...
Article
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Open Access: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01423-2 Four key themes are covered in this issue of JORH, namely: (1) the catastrophic events of 11 September 2001, (2) the syndrome of moral injury, (3) the ongoing calamity of COVID-19, and finally, (4) the validation, translation and use of measurement instruments/scales assessing religion, spiri...
Article
Four substantial topics are explored in this issue of the Journal of Religion and Health, namely: (1) Christianity, (2) family and faith dynamics, (3) the spiritual and religious experiences of students from Islamic, Christian, Buddhist, Hindu, and Jewish perspectives, and lastly, (4) the lingering effects of COVID-19. This issue also notes the dia...
Article
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Although there has been no direct empirical evidence linking sexual dysfunction (SD) with gun ownership, speculation has been widespread and persistent for decades. In this paper, we formally examine the association between SD and gun ownership. Our primary hypothesis, derived from the psychosexual theory of gun ownership, asserts that men experien...
Article
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In this paper, we employed data from the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to formally test whether the association between religious struggles and psychological distress is mediated by psychosocial resources. We found that religious struggles were associated with lower levels of social support, self-esteem, the sense of control, and self-con...
Article
Objective: Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention eventually recommended wearing masks in public to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the practice has been unevenly distributed in the United States. Methods: In this paper, we model county-level infrequent mask usage as a function of three pillars of conservatism: (1) Republican...
Article
Objective We propose and develop novel survey questions and quantitative summary indices of White fragility. Methods The data come from the 2018 Survey of White Fragility, a longitudinal convenience sample of 279 non‐Hispanic white undergraduate students aged 18 and over taking courses at two large public universities in the southeastern and south...
Article
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Over the past two decades, sociologists have convincingly linked guns to social structure (e.g., the social demography of gun ownership), social institutions (e.g., religious and political variations in gun attitudes), various elements of culture (e.g., widespread beliefs about guns), and identity (e.g., the integration of guns and masculinity) (e....
Chapter
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The sociological study of health, illness, and healing systems in the United States is in need of a contemporary disciplinary structure to represent the field. In this commentary, we extend Straus’ (1957) classic two subfield model by defining the structure of Medical Sociology in terms of four major subfields: Social Epidemiology, Social Psycholog...
Article
Objectives To examine the mental health of women in the perinatal period prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods We use provisional vital statistics data for births occurring in the central region of New Jersey. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is employed to assess depressive symptoms. Our focal analysis uses linear regression mo...
Article
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Objectives: We test whether the association between state religiosity and distance travelled is moderated by population age during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Methods: Mobility is operationalized as the state-level average median distance traveled from February 24 to May 4 across the contiguous United States. Shelter-in-place rates a...
Article
Ambient air pollution, in the form of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), poses serious population health risks. We estimate cross-national longitudinal models to test whether the negative relationship between life expectancy and PM2.5 concentration is larger in nations with higher levels of income inequality. The dependent variable is average life ex...
Article
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In this paper, we consider the association between state religiosity and state population mobility during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We use first-party geo-behavioral data collected through mobile phone operating systems, global positioning systems, and Wi-Fi signals to assess changes in the average median distance traveled by all devices...
Chapter
Purpose: Although recent work has made significant contributions to our theoretical understanding of white fragility, more empirical work is needed to establish the social causes of this particular form of racial stress. Our chapter builds on previous research by assessing gender and socioeconomic variations in white fragility. Methodology: Data...
Article
This study contributes to interdisciplinary research on the social and environmental determinants of population health, with a focus on the interaction between working hours and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentration. The authors estimate longitudinal models of the relationship between US state-level average life expectancy and both average...
Article
Objective Although there is little empirical evidence linking gun ownership with personal well‐being, speculation is widespread in gun culture. In this article, we test whether people who own guns are more or less satisfied with their lives than people who do not own guns. Methods We employ data collected from three national surveys, the Baylor Re...
Chapter
Although numerous studies show that religious involvement is associated with better health across the life course, researchers have virtually ignored the outcome of sleep. In this chapter, we test whether religious attendance is inversely associated with sleep disturbance among older Mexican Americans. We also assess whether this association is med...
Article
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Although fixed-effects models for panel data are now widely recognized as powerful tools for longitudinal data analysis, the limitations of these models are not well known. We provide a critical discussion of twelve limitations, including a culture of omission, low statistical power, limited external validity, restricted time periods, measurement e...
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The resurgence of interest in the influence of religion on health is examined within the context of the holistic paradigm and historical connection between nursing and religiosity. While nursing and religiosity often intersect with end-of-life considerations, this article presents findings from studies that demonstrate that religious involvement fa...
Article
Although several studies suggest that religious attendance is associated with better cognitive functioning in later life, researchers have generally failed to connect with any established life course perspectives or theories of cognitive aging. Building on previous work, we examine the effects of life course religious attendance on a range of cogni...
Article
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This study advances research at the intersection of environmental degradation, social stratification, and population health in the United States. Expanding the theoretical principles of Power, Proximity, and Physiology, we hypothesize that the harmful effect of fine particulate matter on life expectancy is greater in states with higher levels of in...
Article
Although numerous studies have shown that religious involvement is associated with better health across the life course, researchers have virtually ignored possible links between religious involvement and sleep-related outcomes. Building on previous work, we tested whether religious attendance is inversely associated with sleep disturbance among ol...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is no empirical evidence linking gun ownership with better sleep, speculation is widespread in gun culture. We assess the direct association between gun ownership and sleep disturbance and whether gun ownership moderates the association between neighborhood fear and sleep disturbance. We use four waves of cross-sectional data from th...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is no empirical evidence linking gun ownership with happiness, speculation is widespread. In this paper, we assess the association between gun ownership and happiness. We use 27 years of national cross-sectional data from the General Social Survey (1973-2018) and logistic regression to model self-rated happiness as a function of gun...
Article
Full-text available
Although numerous studies have shown that religious involvement is associated with better health across the life course, researchers have virtually ignored possible links between religious involvement and sleep-related outcomes. Building on previous work, we tested whether religious attendance is inversely associated with sleep disturbance among ol...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Although research suggest that religious involvement tends to favor longevity, most of this work has been conducted in the United States. This paper explores the association between religious participation and all-cause mortality risk in Mexico. Method: We used data from the 2003-2015 Mexican Health and Aging Study (n = 14,743) and Cox...
Article
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In this paper, we directly assessed the extent to which the association between religious attendance and the social support trajectories of older Mexican Americans is due to selection (spurious) processes related to personality, health status, and health behavior. We employed seven waves of data from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epi...
Article
Moral injury (MI) is a syndrome thought to be separate from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet having some overlap. To determine the overlap, we examined the relationship between MI and the four DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters (B, C, D, E) in US veterans and active duty military (ADM). The 45-item Moral Injury Symptom Scale (MISS-M) was administ...
Chapter
When faced with functional and cognitive impairment, older Latino adults rely primarily on family for care. Little is known about the role of neighborhood structures on the well-being of the family members tasked with delivering care for their elders. Data on care recipients and family caregivers is drawn from the Hispanic Established Population fo...
Article
Full-text available
Although numerous studies have shown that religious attendance is associated with greater social support, concerns remain about selection into religious attendance and more supportive relationships. In this paper, we employ data collected from the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to assess the extent to which the association between religiou...
Chapter
Purpose: Although established theoretical models suggest that race differences in physical health are partially explained by exposures to environmental toxins, there is little empirical evidence to support these processes. We build on previous research by formally testing whether black-white differences in self-rated physical health are mediated by...
Article
Full-text available
Although several studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with healthier biological functioning in later life, most of this work is cross-sectional. We extend previous research by employing a longitudinal design. Our analysis of Health and Retirement Study (2006/2010) data suggests that older adults who attended religious services w...
Article
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Americans can be divided into two groups: those who own guns and those who do not. Although people who own guns and people who do not own guns are often separated along social, cultural, and political lines, it is unclear whether these divisions might extend to population differences in emotional experience. In this paper, we use national cross-sec...
Article
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We examined multiple dimensions of religiosity and their relationship to the four DSM-5 PTSD symptom clusters among US Veterans and Active Duty Military (ADM), hypothesizing that religiosity would be most strongly inversely related to negative cognitions/emotions (Criterion D symptoms) and less strongly to neurobiologically based symptom clusters (...
Article
Full-text available
Although studies have shown that air pollution can be devastating to population health, little is known about the health implications of the intersection of air pollution and income inequality. We investigate if air pollution is especially detrimental to the health of US state populations characterized by more inequitable distributions of income. I...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although studies have shown that air pollution can be devastating to population health, little is known about the health implications of the intersection of air pollution and income inequality. We investigate if air pollution is especially detrimental to the health of US state populations characterized by more inequitable distributions of income. I...
Chapter
When faced with functional and cognitive impairment, older Latino adults rely primarily on family for care. Little is known about the role of neighborhood structures on the well-being of the family members tasked with delivering care for their elders. Data on care recipients and family caregivers is drawn from the Hispanic Established Population fo...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of the association between religious attendance and body mass have yielded mixed results. In this paper, we consider intersectional variations by race and gender to advance our understanding of these inconsistencies. We use data from the 2006-2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to examine the association between religious attendance and...
Article
Full-text available
Although several studies have documented an inverse association between stressful events and sleep quality, much less is known about the factors that might moderate or buffer against the adverse effects of psychosocial stress on sleep. Building on previous research, we employ national cross-sectional survey data from the 2017 Baylor Religion Survey...
Article
This study examines the extent to which ethnic identity is a protective factor and buffers the stress of discrimination among the foreign born compared to the U.S. born in Miami-Dade County. Data were drawn from the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (N = 444), which is a countywide probability sample of adults in South Florida. Two interaction effects...
Article
For nearly half a century, jobs have become increasingly characterized by employment insecurity. We examined the implications for sleep disturbance with cross-sectional data from the European Working Conditions Survey (2010). 24,553 workers between the ages of 25 and 65 in 31 European countries were asked to indicate whether they suffered from “ins...
Article
Although numerous cross-sectional studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with lower rates of substance use, it is unclear whether these protective effects can be observed over time with more rigorous longitudinal designs. In this study, we use longitudinal data from the U.S. Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 3,176) t...
Article
Although numerous empirical studies show that religious involvement is associated with better health and longer life expectancies, researchers have virtually ignored possible links between religious involvement and sleep. To spark greater attention to this important and understudied area of sleep research, we review previous population-based studie...
Article
In this paper, we use data from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) to examine the association between religious involvement and marijuana use for medical and recreational purposes in U.S. adults (n = 41,517). We also consider whether the association between religious involvement and marijuana use varies according to personal he...
Article
Full-text available
Although established theoretical models suggest that socioeconomic inequalities in physical health are partially mediated or explained by exposures to environmental toxins, there is little empirical evidence to support these processes. Building on previous research, we analyze data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2007-20...
Article
We test whether income inequality undermines female and male life expectancy in the United States. We employ data for all 50 states and the District of Columbia and two-way fixed effects to model state-level average life expectancy as a function of multiple income inequality measures and time-varying characteristics. We find that state-level income...
Article
Background. Exposure to stressful life events (SLEs) in early life is associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality from age-related chronic disease. In this study, we considered whether these general patterns extend to leukocyte telomere length (TL), an indicator of cellular aging. We also explored potential subgroup variations by race a...
Article
Do health behaviors cluster together as health lifestyles in adolescence? Are these lifestyles socially patterned? Do these lifestyles impact physical health into adulthood? To answer these questions, we employed data from Waves 1 and 4 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 7,827). Our latent class analysis revealed...
Article
Objectives: Although racial and ethnic differences in HPV vaccination initiation are well established, it is unclear whether these disparities have changed over time. The role of health provider recommendations in reducing any racial and ethnic inequalities is also uncertain. This study addresses these gaps in the literature. Study design: Repea...
Article
Full-text available
Although numerous studies have shown that discrimination contributes to poorer mental health, the precise mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. In this paper, we consider the possibility that the association between day-to-day discrimination (being disrespected, insulted, and harassed) and depressive symptoms is partially...
Article
Although numerous studies show that religious involvement is associated with favorable health outcomes, it is unclear whether this general pattern extends to cellular aging. The mechanisms linking religious involvement and indicators of cellular aging are also undefined. We employ data from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study, a national probabili...
Article
Given the future growth of the elderly Mexican-origin population, the need for culturally informed dementia care will inevitably grow in the years ahead. Dementia-related needs of older adults living in the community are multidimensional and based on severity of dementia; yet, there is a lack of information on emotional and instrumental support nee...
Chapter
In this chapter, we draw on health lifestyle, human capital, and health commodity theories to examine the effects of educational attainment on a wide range of individual dietary behaviors and dietary lifestyles. Using data from the 2005-2006 iteration of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 2,135), we employ negative binomial r...
Article
Objective: Although several studies suggest that religious involvement tends to favor healthy biological functioning, most of this work has been conducted in the United States. This study explores the association between religious participation and biological functioning in Mexico. Method: The data are drawn from two waves of the Mexican Health...