Teresa J Parker

Teresa J Parker
Monash University (Australia) · School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

PhD

About

14
Publications
2,081
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289
Citations
Introduction
Tess Parker is a Research Fellow in the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University (Australia) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes. Her current work examines the role of heavy rainfall in the development of and recovery from drought, and the synoptic/dynamics associated with these processes. Her ongoing research includes extremes of heat, precipitation, and wind, including the synoptic-dynamics of compound events.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2018 - December 2018
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2018 - June 2018
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
February 2010 - November 2014
Monash University (Australia)
Field of study
  • Meteorology and Climate
February 2009 - November 2009
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Atmosphere and Ocean Science
February 2006 - November 2008
University of Melbourne
Field of study
  • Atmosphere and Ocean Science

Publications

Publications (14)
Preprint
Full-text available
In the Northern Hemisphere, recurrence of transient Rossby wave packets over periods of days to weeks, termed RRWPs, may repeatedly create similar weather conditions. This recurrence leads to persistent surface anomalies and high-impact weather events. Here, we demonstrate the significance of RRWPs for persistent heatwaves in the Southern Hemispher...
Article
Full-text available
Flash droughts can be distinguished by rapid intensification from near-normal soil moisture to drought conditions in a matter of weeks. Here, we provide the first characterisation of a climatology of flash drought across Australia using a suite of indices. The experiment is designed to capture a range of conditions related to drought: evaporative d...
Article
Full-text available
The winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) has varied on interannual and decadal timescales over the last century, associated with variations in the speed and latitude of the eddy‐driven jet stream. This paper uses hindcasts from two operational seasonal forecast systems (the European Centre for Medium‐range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)'s seasonal fo...
Article
Full-text available
Motivated by the record-breaking heatwaves of early 2017, the synoptic structure and evolution of summer (December–February) heatwaves in the Sydney area is investigated through composite and trajectory analyses. In the upper troposphere, the main features of the composite structure are an isolated upper-tropospheric anticyclonic potential vorticit...
Article
Full-text available
The physical mechanisms by which heat waves in the Brisbane region of Australia develop are elucidated through trajectory and composite analyses. Trajectories are started close to the surface during heat waves and integrated backward. Those trajectories for which the net diabatic heating lies in the uppermost pentile are called strongly diabatic, w...
Article
Full-text available
The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is the leading mode of variability in the large scale circulation over the North Atlantic in winter, and strongly influences the weather and climate of Europe. On synoptic timescales, the negative phase of the NAO often corresponds to the occurrence of a blocking episode over Greenland. Hence, the dynamics and p...
Article
The variance of a jet's position in latitude is found to be related to its average speed: when a jet becomes stronger, its variability in latitude decreases. This relationship is shown to hold for observed midlatitude jets around the world and also across a hierarchy of numerical models. North Atlantic jet variability is shown to be modulated on de...
Article
Full-text available
Midlatitude weather and climate are dominated by the jet streams and associated eastward moving storm systems. Occasionally, however, these are blocked by persistent anticyclonic regimes known as blocking. Climate models generally predict a small decline in blocking frequency under anthropogenic climate change. However, confidence in these predicti...
Article
Full-text available
Summertime heat waves in the southeastern state of Victoria, Australia are associated with broad anticyclonic upper level potential vorticity (PV) anomalies. The current research seeks to establish the relationship between heat waves, precipitation, and three modes of climate variability of importance for rainfall in Australia: the El Niño-Southern...
Article
Full-text available
The underlying large scale dynamical processes responsible for the development of heat waves in southeastern Australia in summer are presented here. Heat waves are defined as periods of at least three days and two nights for which daily maximum and minimum temperatures exceed the 90th percentile for a particular location and month, using a station...
Article
Full-text available
[1] Heat waves in southeastern Australia in summer are commonly associated with slow-moving surface high-pressure systems, which result in warm northerly flow from the continental interior. The underlying dynamical pattern of heat waves in this region is associated with propagating Rossby waves, which grow in amplitude and eventually overturn, form...
Article
Full-text available
On 31 July 2007 a fatal light aircraft crash occurred near Clonbinane, Victoria, Australia and the official investigation concluded that mountain wave turbulence was the likely cause. This study uses three-dimensional numerical modelling and linear wave theory to examine the dynamics of mountain waves during this turbulence event and their role in...

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