Teresa Gimeno

Teresa Gimeno
BC3-Basque Centre for Climate Change | BCCC

PhDConservacion Recursos Natur

About

58
Publications
26,571
Reads
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2,378
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2014 - November 2014
Western Sydney University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2011 - September 2011
King Juan Carlos University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2006 - October 2011

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
There is a pressing need to better understand ecosystem resilience to droughts and heatwaves. Eco‐evolutionary optimisation approaches have been proposed as means to build this understanding in land surface models and improve their predictive capability, but competing approaches are yet to be tested together. Here, we coupled approaches that optimi...
Article
Full-text available
In West Africa, Harmattan-induced atmospheric and soil droughts represent seasonally recurring hazards for Theobroma cacao L. agro-ecosystems. Under the influence of the Harmattan winds, precipitation is impaired and air humidity and temperature reach stressful levels. Climate change is causing an increase in temperature that will drive up the evap...
Article
Forests are being impacted by climate and land-use changes which have altered their productivity and growth. Understanding how tree growth responds to climate in natural and planted stands may provide valuable information to prepare management in sight of climate change. Plantations are expected to show higher sensitivity to climate and lower post-...
Preprint
Full-text available
Isotope-based approaches to study plant water sources rely on the assumption that root water uptake and within-plant water transport are non-fractionating processes. However, a growing number of studies have reported offsets between plant and source water stable isotope composition, for a wide range of ecosystems. These isotopic offsets can result...
Article
Full-text available
Plant transpiration links physiological responses of vegetation to water supply and demand with hydrological, energy, and carbon budgets at the land–atmosphere interface. However, despite being the main land evaporative flux at the global scale, transpiration and its response to environmental drivers are currently not well constrained by observatio...
Article
Full-text available
Land surface models underpin coupled climate model projections of droughts and heatwaves. However, the lack of simultaneous observations of individual components of evapotranspiration, concurrent with root-zone soil moisture, has limited previous model evaluations. Here, we use a comprehensive set of observations from a water-limited site in southe...
Article
Photosynthetic water‐use efficiency (WUE) describes the link between terrestrial carbon and water cycles. Estimates of intrinsic WUE (iWUE) from gas‐exchange and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) differ due to an internal conductance in the leaf mesophyll (gm) that is variable and seldom computed. We present the first direct estimates of whole‐tre...
Article
Full-text available
Plant transpiration links physiological responses of vegetation to water supply and demand with hydrological,energy and carbon budgets at the land-atmosphere interface. However, despite being the main land evaporative flux at the global scale, transpiration and its response to environmental drivers are currently not well constrained by observations...
Article
We apply and compare three widely applicable methods for estimating ecosystem transpiration (T) from eddy covariance (EC) data across 251 FLUXNET sites globally. All three methods are based on the coupled water and carbon relationship, but they differ in assumptions and parameterizations. Intercomparison of the three daily T estimates shows high co...
Article
We apply and compare three widely applicable methods for estimating ecosystem transpiration (T) from eddy covariance (EC) data across 251 FLUXNET sites globally. All three methods are based on the coupled water and carbon relationship, but they differ in assumptions and parameterizations. Intercomparison of the three daily T estimates shows high co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Land surface models underpin coupled climate model projections of droughts and heatwaves. However, the lack of simultaneous observations of individual components of evapotranspiration, concurrent with root-zone soil moisture, has limited previous model evaluations. Here, we use a comprehensive set of observations from a water-limited site in southe...
Article
Full-text available
A growing number of field studies report isotopic offsets between stem water and its potential sources that prevent the unambiguous identification of plant water origin using water isotopes. We explored the causes of this isotopic offset by conducting a controlled experiment on the temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica. We measured δ2H and δ18O of...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment (eCO2) can enhance plant carbon uptake and growth1–5, thereby providing an important negative feedback to climate change by slowing the rate of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration6. Although evidence gathered from young aggrading forests has generally indicated a strong CO2 fertilization effect on bio...
Article
Full-text available
The response of mature forest ecosystems to a rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (Ca) is a major uncertainty in projecting the future trajectory of the Earth's climate. Although leaf-level net photosynthesis is typically stimulated by exposure to elevated Ca (eCa), it is unclear how this stimulation translates into carbon cycle respons...
Article
The functioning of plant communities is strongly influenced by the number of species in the community and their spatial arrangement. This is because plants interact with their nearest neighbors and this interaction is expected to be stronger when the interacting individuals are ecologically similar in terms of resource use. Recent evidence shows th...
Article
Vapour pressure deficit (D) is projected to increase in the future as temperatures rise. In response to increased D, stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthesis (A) are reduced, which may result in significant reductions in terrestrial carbon, water, and energy fluxes. It is thus important for gas exchange models to capture the observed responses...
Article
Full-text available
The response of mature forest ecosystems to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (Ca) is a major uncertainty in projecting the future trajectory of the Earth’s climate. Although leaf-level net photosynthesis is typically stimulated by exposure to elevated Ca (eCa), it is unclear how this stimulation translates into carbon cycle responses...
Preprint
Full-text available
Atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment (eCO2) can enhance plant carbon uptake and growth, thereby providing an important negative feedback to climate change by slowing the rate of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. While evidence gathered from young aggrading forests has generally indicated a strong CO2 fertilization effect on biomass gr...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated plant water sources of an emblematic refugial population of Fagus sylvatica (L.) in the Ciron river gorges in south-western France using stable water isotopes. It is generally assumed that no isotopic fractionation occurs during root water uptake, so that the isotopic composition of xylem water effectively reflects that of source wa...
Article
Full-text available
The primary function of stomata is to minimize plant water loss while maintaining CO2 assimilation. Stomatal water loss incurs an indirect cost to photosynthesis in the form of non-stomatal limitations (NSL) via reduced carboxylation capacity (CAP) and/or mesophyll conductance (MES). Two optimal formulations for stomatal conductance (gs) arise from...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated plant water sources of an emblematic refugial population of Fagus sylvatica (L.) in the Ciron river gorges in South-Western France using stable water isotopes. It is generally assumed that no isotopic fractionation occurs during root water uptake, so that the isotopic composition of xylem water effectively reflects that of source wa...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated plant-water sources of an emblematic refugial population of Fagus sylvatica (L.) in the Ciron river gorges in South-Western France using stable isotopes. The stable isotopes of water are a powerful tracer of water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. It is generally assumed that no isotopic fractionation occurs during root...
Article
Full-text available
For the past decade, observations of carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) have been investigated as a proxy for carbon uptake by plants. OCS is destroyed by enzymes that interact with CO2 during photosynthesis, namely carbonic anhydrase (CA) and RuBisCO, where CA is the more important one. The majority of sources of OCS to the atmosphere are geographicall...
Article
Full-text available
Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCa ) might reduce forest water-use, due to decreased transpiration, following partial stomatal closure, thus enhancing water-use efficiency and productivity at low water availability. If evapotranspiration (Et ) is reduced, it may subsequently increase soil water storage (ΔS) or surface runoff (R) and draina...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study we investigated variations in leaf respiration in darkness (RD) and light (RL), and associated traits in response to season, and along a gradient of soil moisture, in Mediterranean woodland dominated by holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) in central and north-eastern Spain respectively. On seven occasions during the year in the central...
Article
Full-text available
For the past decade, observations of carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) have been investigated as a proxy for carbon uptake by plants. OCS is destroyed by enzymes that interact with CO2 during photosynthesis, namely carbonic anhydrase (CA) and RuBisCO, where CA is the more important. The majority of sources of OCS to the atmosphere are geographically se...
Data
Fig. S1 Allan variance plot showing the standard deviation for the QCLS. Fig. S2 Tissue relative water content and sample temperature with desiccation. Fig. S3 Sample temperature inside the gas‐exchange chamber during light curves. Fig. S4 Individual metabolite (protein and nonstructural carbohydrate) concentrations. Fig. S5 CO2 and COS net upt...
Article
Full-text available
Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a potential tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP), assuming a unidirectional COS flux into the vegetation that scales with GPP. However, carbonic anhydrase (CA), the enzyme that hydrolyses COS, is expected to be light independent, and thus plants without stomata should continue to take up COS in the dark. We measured...
Article
Full-text available
Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a potential tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP), assuming a unidirectional COS flux into the vegetation that scales with GPP. However, carbonic anhydrase (CA), the enzyme that hydrolyses COS, is expected to be light independent, and thus plants without stomata should continue to take up COS in the dark. We measured...
Article
Full-text available
Rising atmospheric CO2 stimulates photosynthesis and productivity of forests, offsetting CO2 emissions. Elevated CO2 experiments in temperate planted forests yielded ∼23% increases in productivity over the initial years. Whether similar CO2 stimulation occurs in mature evergreen broadleaved forests on low-phosphorus (P) soils is unknown, largely du...
Article
The response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca ), particularly under nutrient limited conditions, is a major uncertainty in Earth System models. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient-and water-limited woodland, presents a unique opportunity to address this...
Article
Full-text available
Canopy leaf area, quantified by the leaf area index (L), is a crucial driver of forest productivity, water use, and energy balance. Because L responds to environmental drivers, it can represent an important feedback to climate change, but its responses to rising atmospheric [CO2 ] and water availability of forests have been poorly quantified. We st...
Article
Full-text available
Projections of future climate are highly sensitive to uncertainties regarding carbon (C) uptake and storage by terrestrial ecosystems. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment was established to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) on a native mature eucalypt woodland with low fertility soils in so...
Article
Full-text available
Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca) and simultaneous climate change profoundly affect plant physiological performance while challenging our ability to estimate vegetation-atmosphere fluxes. To predict rates of water and carbon exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere, we require a formulation for stomatal conductance (gs) that...
Article
Full-text available
Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally ap...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf dark respiration (Rdark ) is an important yet poorly quantified component of the global carbon cycle. Given this, we analyzed a new global database of Rdark and associated leaf traits. Data for 899 species were compiled from 100 sites (from the Arctic to the tropics). Several woody and nonwoody plant functional types (PFTs) were represented. M...
Article
Full-text available
In harsh environments facilitation alleviates biotic and abiotic constraints on tree recruitment. Under ongoing drier climate change, we expect facilitation to increase as a driver of coexistence. However, this might not hold under extreme abiotic stress and when the outcome depends on the interaction with other drivers such as altered herbivore pr...
Article
One of the current advances in functional biodiversity research is the move away from short-lived test systems towards the exploration of diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in structurally more complex ecosystems. In forests, assumptions about the functional significance of tree species diversity have only recently produced a new generat...
Article
Climate change involves warmer temperatures, altered precipitation patterns, increased climatic variability and, in Mediterranean regions, increased frequency and severity of droughts. Tree species may show different growth responses to these components of climatic change, which may trigger changes in forest composition and dominance. We assessed t...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Plant-soil interactions are a crucial component of ecosystem functioning. However, most global change studies focus on plant communities, with information on soil properties and performance being scarce. Our goal was to assess the individual and joint effect of habitat heterogeneity and three global change drivers (fragmentation...
Article
Full-text available
World-wide deforestation is being reversed in Mediterranean continental areas, where abandonment of traditional practises favours the expansion of valuable habitats, like Juniperus thurifera woodlands. We hypoth-esised that pre-existing trees facilitate establishment in expanding woodlands, whereas in mature woodlands, competition leads to patch di...
Article
In Mediterranean–continental regions, changes in land use are leading to the expansion of valuable habitats like endemic Juniperus thurifera woodlands, but the impact of reduced rainfall, due to climate change, on this expansion remains uncertain. We assessed the early performance of J. thurifera in different global change scenarios with and withou...
Article
Full-text available
Juniperus thurifera L. is an endemic conifer of the western Mediterranean Basin where it is subjected to a severe climatic stress characterized by low winter temperatures and summer drought. Given the trend of increased warming-induced drought stress in this area and the climatic sensitivity of this species, we expect a negative impact of climate c...
Article
1. The spatial distribution of individual plants within a population and the population’s genetic structure are determined by several factors, like dispersal, reproduction mode or biotic interactions. The role of interspecific interactions in shaping the spatial genetic structure of plant populations remains largely unknown. 2. Species with a commo...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impacts of atmospheric [CO2] and drought on leaf respiration (R) and its response to changes in temperature is critical to improve predictions of plant carbon-exchange with the atmosphere, especially at higher temperatures. We quantified the effects of [CO2]-enrichment (+240 ppm) on seasonal shifts in the diel temperature response...
Article
Plant populations are subjected to changes in their natural environment as a result of the incidence of simultaneous global change drivers. Despite the fact that these changes can largely affect early fitness components, information on the effects of simultaneous drivers of global change on offspring traits and performance is particularly scant. We...
Article
Under drought, when photosynthesis (A) is impaired, foliar respiration (R) becomes crucial to estimate plant carbon balance. However, the effects of drought on R remain unclear and little is known about differences between congeners with divergent anatomy. In this study we compared the physiological response to imposed drought in plants of two Acac...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the relationship between variation in phyllode nerve density and the spatio-temporal response of the photosynthetic apparatus to water-stress in two Acacia s.str. species with contrasting nerve patterns: Acacia floribunda (Vent.) Willd and Acacia pycnantha Benth. A. floribunda had greater primary nerve density than A. pycnantha and also...
Article
Full-text available
Plant populations of widely distributed species experience a broad range of environmental conditions that can be faced by phenotypic plasticity or ecotypic differentiation and local adaptation. The strategy chosen will determine a population's ability to respond to climate change. To explore this, we grew Quercus ilex (L.) seedlings from acorns col...
Article
Full-text available
Soil microorganisms, such as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), play crucial roles in plant growth, but their influence on plant water relations remains poorly explored. We studied the effects of native soil microorganisms and inoculation with the PGPR strain Aur6 of Pseudomonas fluorescens on water stress responses of seedlings of the dr...

Projects

Project (1)