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Teagen D Quilichini

Teagen D Quilichini
National Research Council Canada (Saskatoon)

BSc (Hons), PhD

About

29
Publications
8,474
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Citations
Introduction
I’m fascinated by how plants develop, reproduce and adapt to diverse, challenging environments. My doctorate provided insight into pollen wall formation using molecular genetics in Arabidopsis. My PDF focused on cannabis biochemistry and genomics, examining phytochemical sequestration on the plant body. Currently, I study genetic regulation of embryo and seed development, with the goal of advancing understanding to create translational opportunities for crop productivity improvement.
Additional affiliations
March 2021 - October 2021
National Research Council Canada
Position
  • Research Officer
September 2016 - February 2021
National Research Council Canada
Position
  • Research Associate
March 2014 - September 2016
Anandia Labs Inc. and University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2008 - May 2014
September 2003 - May 2008

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Pollen grains are encased by a multilayered, multifunctional wall. The sporopollenin and pollen coat constituents of the outer pollen wall (exine) are contributed by surrounding sporophytic tapetal cells. Because the biosynthesis and development of the exine occurs in the innermost cell layers of the anther, direct observations of this process are...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Solid-stemmed wheat cultivars are resistant to the wheat stem sawfly, an important agricultural pest. Here, we identify TdDof as the causal gene that controls stem solidness in wheat. We show that copy number gain of TdDof correlates with its increased expression and the solid-stem phenotype. Our results suggest TdDof could function as...
Article
The cannabis leaf is iconic, but it is the flowers of cannabis that are consumed for the psychoactive and medicinal effects of their specialized metabolites. Cannabinoid metabolites, together with terpenes, are produced in glandular trichomes. Superficially, stalked and sessile trichomes in cannabis only differ in size and whether they have a stalk...
Article
Modern wheat production comes from two polyploid species Triticum (T.) aestivum and T. turgidum (var. durum), which putatively arose from diploid ancestors, T. urartu, Aegilops (Ae.) speltoides and Ae. tauschii. How gene expression during embryogenesis and grain development in wheats has been shaped by differing contributions of diploid genomes thr...
Chapter
The growth, distribution, and use of Cannabis sativa (cannabis) have been tightly restricted for decades due to the therapeutic and psychoactive molecules it produces. Despite long-standing cultivation, scientific research on cannabis has been limited, with past efforts to breed and improve this crop largely supported by an illegal global economy....
Article
Full-text available
In plants, the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role in defense against diverse pathogens. The formation of actin patches is essential for the intracellular transport of organelles and molecules toward pathogen penetration sites and the formation of papillae for an early cellular response to powdery mildew attack in Arabidopsis thaliana. This re...
Article
Full-text available
Seed development in angiosperms produces three genetically and developmentally distinct sub-compartments: the embryo, endosperm, and seed coat. The maternally derived seed coat protects the embryo and interacts closely with the external environment especially during germination and seedling establishment. Seed coat is a key contributor to seed comp...
Article
We report the identification of two SNPs in Cannabis sativa that are associated with female and male plant sex phenotypes, and are located on the top arm of the X chromosome. High Resolution Melt analysis was used to develop and validate a novel, rapid method for sex identification in medical/recreational cannabis as well as in hemp. This method ca...
Article
Full-text available
The economically valuable Brassica species include the six related members of U’s Triangle. Despite the agronomic and economic importance of these Brassicas, the impacts of evolution and relatively recent domestication events on the genetic landscape of seed development have not been comprehensively examined in these species. Here we present a 3D t...
Article
Full-text available
The extreme chemical and physical recalcitrance of sporopollenin deems this biopolymer among the most resilient organic materials on Earth. As the primary material fortifying spore and pollen cell walls, sporopollenin is touted as a critical innovation in the progression of plant life to a terrestrial setting. Although crucial for its protective ro...
Article
The actin cytoskeleton regulates an array of diverse cellular activities that support the establishment of plant-microbe interactions and plays a critical role in the execution of plant immunity. However, molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating the assembly and rearrangement of actin filaments at plant-pathogen interaction sites remain largely...
Article
Full-text available
Among polyploid species with complex genomic architecture, variations in the regulation of alternative splicing (AS) provide opportunities for transcriptional and proteomic plasticity and the potential for generating trait diversities. However, the evolution of AS and its influence on grain development in diploid grass and valuable polyploid wheat...
Article
Different phosphoinositides enriched at the membrane of specific subcellular compartments within plant cells contribute to organelle identity, ensuring appropriate cellular trafficking and function. During the infection of plant cells, biotrophic pathogens such as powdery mildews enter plant cells and differentiate into haustoria. Each haustorium i...
Article
The ability to create desirable gene variants through targeted changes offers tremendous opportunities for the advancement of basic and applied plant research. Gene editing technologies have opened new avenues to perform such precise gene modifications in diverse biological systems. These technologies use sequence-specific nucleases, such as homing...
Article
From scientific advances in medical research to the plethora of anti-aging products available, our obsession with slowing the aging process and increasing lifespan is indisputable. A large research effort has been levied towards this perpetual search for the fountain of youth, yet the molecular mechanisms governing an organism’s lifespan and the ca...
Article
Full-text available
Embryogenesis represents a critical phase in the life cycle of flowering plants. Here, we characterize transcriptome landscapes associated with key stages of embryogenesis by combining an optimized method for the isolation of developing Arabidopsis embryos with high-throughput RNA-seq. The resulting RNA-seq datasets identify distinct overlapping pa...
Article
Full-text available
The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated by various stresses during vegetative development in Arabidopsis, but is constitutively active in anthers of unstressed plants. To understand the role of the UPR during reproductive development, we analyzed a double mutant, ire1a ire1b. The double mutant knocks out the RNA splicing arm of the UPR sig...
Article
The method consists of imaging developing pollen grains as they form within intact, immature Arabidopsis thaliana anthers. Using two-photon excitation in the infrared wavelength range, the intrinsic fluorescence (autofluorescence) of developing pollen grains and surrounding sporophytic tissues of the anther wall, including the tapetum, middle layer...
Article
The formation of the durable outer pollen wall, largely composed of sporopollenin, is essential for the protection of the male gametophyte and plant reproduction. Despite its apparent strict conservation amongst land plants, the composition of sporopollenin and the biosynthetic pathway(s) yielding this recalcitrant biopolymer remain elusive. Recent...
Article
Background and AimsThe Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cell wall is a complex structure consisting of an outer sporopollenin framework and lipid-rich coat, as well as an inner cellulosic wall. Although mutant analysis has been a useful tool to study pollen cell walls, the ultrastructure of the arabidopsis anther has proved to be challenging to preserve...
Article
In flowering plants, anther and pollen development is critical for male reproductive success. The anther cuticle and pollen exine play an essential role, and in many cereals, such as rice, orbicules/ubisch bodies are also thought to be important for pollen development. The formation of the anther cuticle, exine and orbicules is associated with the...
Conference Paper
Sporopollenin, a highly resistant biopolymer in plant spore and pollen walls, protects these key reproductive structures from environmental stresses. From the data available, sporopollenin is a polymer of fatty acids and oxygenated aromatic compounds, coupled by ester and ether linkages, which provide the biopolymer with its characteristic resistan...
Article
Full-text available
The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transpo...
Chapter
Microtubules (MTs) are dynamic components of plant cells, and are organized into four major arrays. The growth and organization of MTs in these arrays is regulated by a group of structural proteins called the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). A number of MAPs have been identified in plants, some of which are plant-specific. Another group of M...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I'm using phenoVein, through MeVisLab, to analyze leaf venation patterns, but cannot select and zoom in on an area of interest in the manual correction window. I'd like to zoom in as illustrated in Figure 2 of the phenoView publication, so that precise manual corrections can be made. Does anyone with experience using phenoVein know how to zoom in and/or select regions of interest for manually correcting vein selections? I'm using a mac.
If there's a different program you recommend, I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks in advance!

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