Tatjana Schneider

Tatjana Schneider
Technische Universität Braunschweig · Department of Architecture

PhD MArch

About

53
Publications
49,537
Reads
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731
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
559 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
Tatjana Schneider currently works at the Department of Architecture, Technische Universität Braunschweig, where she is Professor for History and Theory of Architecture and the City.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2014 - March 2015
HafenCity University Hamburg
Position
  • Professor (Gast)
January 2012 - August 2018
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
April 2001 - February 2006
University of Strathclyde
Field of study
  • Architecture
October 1998 - September 1999
University of Strathclyde
Field of study
  • Architecture
October 1997 - September 1998
Technische Universität Kaiserslautern
Field of study
  • Architecture

Publications

Publications (53)
Book
This book offers the first comprehensive overview of alternative approaches to architectural practice.
Book
Full-text available
Cities are full of stories–simultaneous, contradictory, overlapping and inextricably linked. Against this backdrop, this publication tells more than fifty stories from within Europe (and beyond). It gathers accounts from architecture, art, and urban planning that address questions around the making of cities. They relate the urban as a lived space...
Book
What role might architecture—and the architect—play in the twenty-first century? What possibilities arise when we view architecture as a form of agency rather than as a collection of objects? What spatial dynamics emerge when we turn our practices away from the dictates of the neoliberal era with its obsession with growth and skimming off profit? S...
Article
Full-text available
Wenn Stadt mehr als eine Ansammlung von besonders vielen Gebäuden, wenn städtisches Leben mehr als die Ordnung von Alltagsabläufen sein soll, dann muss dem, was dieses Mehr ausmacht, in der Planung auch wirkungsvoller Raum gegeben werden. Eine auf Ästhetik fokussierte Sicht auf Stadt kann dem nicht gerecht werden.
Book
Cities are full of stories—running in parallel, contradictory, overlapping and inseparably linked. Such stories are told in Living the City by referencing various projects from architecture, art, and urban planning. The book aims to show processes and possibilities for action in cities based on more than fifty projects from all over Europe. The pub...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the concept of ‘passage territories’ (Sennett, 2006), de ned as living spaces constructed from one’s passage of movement from one separate space to another, and how it extends the discussion of interiority in contested contexts. Through observations of living spaces and the narrative accounts of dwellers’ in Kampung Pulo and...
Article
In this paper we present an experimental sonic space, the mobile noise abatement pod (mNAP), constructed and used over a two-week period in Delhi, India, in December 2014. The interdisciplinary project, involving a composer, designer, carpenter, development scholar, filmmaker, graphic designer and sociologist, aimed to investigate how noise, includ...
Presentation
Full-text available
The polemic posits that technical drawings could be a means to generate discussions in the field of architecture about wider global changes and development. Starting from an anecdote about the resistance to reading, I argue that notions of solidarity, welfare or equitable access to resources should be inscribed in technical details - drawings that...
Article
Full-text available
“She stood paralysed, frozen in front of a wall of immaculate drawings of impossibly elaborate visions: airships dragging contraptions across moon-rock landscapes, fleets of hover vehicles gliding to and fro. It could have been the storyboard for the next 3D superhero extravaganza from Marvel Studios – but it was in fact the final diploma project o...
Article
To-date geographical research on encounters has primarily comprised observation of naturalistic settings (both micro publics and everyday public spaces) or narrative accounts of encounters generated by conventional methods, this paper focuses on a contrived spatial experiment to create meaningful contact across difference. Inspired by, and drawing...
Article
Full-text available
Blind spots exist in every society, culture, and urban fabric. They can be spatial, social, economic, or policy related. On the one hand, blind spots are typically situations or topics that are obscured by other themes; they fall beyond our radar because they are neither considered topical nor pressing enough to be addressed by policy or planning,...
Presentation
Full-text available
[in German] Presentation at the re-launch of Martin Wagner’s book ’Das Wachsende Haus’ (The Growing House) at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The short talk contextualises Martin Wagner’s work from the 1930s and reflects on its relevance today. A video of the talk and other contributions to the symposium is available at https://vimeo.com/...
Chapter
By exploring ideas and characters from the 1960s and 1970s, ‘More slack space, please’ offers a historical perspective of discussions around architectural practice and education. It traces moments of the rise of community architecture when it was understood as ideological commitment and engages with the need to match this commitment through an acti...
Article
Jeremy Till and Tatjana Schneider call for a redefinition of the architect away from the professional who is ostensibly involved in adding ‘more stuff to the world’. Looking beyond the business of matter or managing the impact of that matter on the environment, they explore ways that designers can use their intelligence and creativity to shift exis...
Article
Full-text available
Seeing beyond the heroic male member and sharing credit where it’s due Reading David Rosenberg’s piece on Spatial Agency: Other Ways of Doing Architecture titled ‘Till et al under the spotlight’ − you might have been mistaken into believing that the main author of this book was Jeremy Till. While he is of course the most prominent figure among the...
Poster
Full-text available
This manifesto is a critique of architectural education, its focus on one-size-fits all approaches, unreconstructed teaching methods and conservative politics and makes a case for a politically responsible practice, expanded understandings of what design is and what design is for.
Article
Full-text available
The term 'spatial agency' was developed out of a research project , which has resulted in a book and accompanying website, written together with Nishat Awan. The aim of the project was to uncover an alternative history of architectural praxis, one that had been largely ignored by mainstream architectural histories. When we conceived the project in...
Chapter
In Chapter 7, “Discard an Axiom”, Tatjana Schneider presents a manifestation of the issues and problems transdisciplinarity confronts and is confronted with within the context of architecture, with a particular focus on the interface between education and practice, theory and praxis. In her text, these issues and problems purposely appear as fragme...
Article
This paper posits relating ethics to architecture in a manner that exceeds the dogged connection of ethics to building as object. The accepted definition of an architect is as someone who designs buildings. If this definition is to hold, then where apart from the building can ethical behaviour be exercised? Hence, the historical and theoretical ass...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper aims to introduce the background, scope and approach of a research collaboration between the School of Architecture at the University of Sheffield and design practice Architecture 00:/, to investigate plausible alternatives to traditional developer-led models in the form of individual, group and community-led development (often also refe...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the word ‘agency’ in relation to the role, responsibility and power of the architect. Using Anthony Giddens’s formulation of agency, we discuss the transformative potential of architecture where the lack of a predetermined future is seen as an opportunity and not a threat. Four episodes describe related instances of archit...
Article
Full-text available
How might flexible housing be achieved? ‘Determinate’ and ‘indeterminate’ approaches are examined using twentieth-century examples
Article
Full-text available
The paper 'The Opportunities of Flexible Housing' addresses today's need for buildings that can adapt to change over time. By discussing ideology, participation, use, technology, and finance as parameters for flexible housing, this paper also investigates reasons for current non-implementation and obstacles as inherent to the UK housing market, bef...
Article
Full-text available
Flexible housing can be defined as housing that is designed for choice at the design stage, both in terms of social use and construction, or designed for change over its lifetime. This paper argues that flexibility is an important consideration in the design of housing if it is to be socially, economically and environmentally viable. The degree of...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (10)
Project
The research project (jointly held by Jeremy Till and Tatjana Schneider and funded by the AHRC in the UK and the DFG in Germany) investigates the way in which the architectural profession, and other practitioners working in the field of the built environment, might operate in the face of the climate emergency. Living with climate emergency demands systemic change to our economies, behaviours and social structures - all of which have profound implications for approaches to our built environment. Where most research concerning architecture and the environment concentrates on technical and material responses, mainly relating to carbon reduction, this project looks at the cultural and economic contexts of the climate emergency, and the implications these have for spatial practice (a term that designates multiple ways of operating in the production of the built and natural environment). It investigates in particular the urgent need to reconsider assumptions of growth, extraction and progress on which orthodox economics is based - and which the modern project of architecture both signalled and was founded on. The aim of the project is to investigate what happens to architecture after some of those principles are challenged by the demands arising from the climate emergency. The 'Architecture after Architecture' project is led by a UK-German team of architects and academics based in Central Saint Martins (University of the Arts London) and the Technische Universität Braunschweig, collaborating internationally with economists, sociologists, designers, artists, writers and journalists to imagine the future of spatial practices. It starts with cultural, economic and political discourses around the climate emergency as they relate to spatial practice. It will also gather evidence from contemporary spatial practice to analyse approaches that might be relevant to facing it. Because climate impacts on wider societal contexts, the project will also explore non-spatial conditions, such as those outlined in the various versions of the Green New Deal (GND). The final stage of the project takes these analyses, and projects future scenarios into which new forms of spatial practice are placed. It asks the questions: What are the spatial implications of the systemic changes arising from the climate emergency, and what role may architects and spatial agents[^spatialagency] play in the envisioning and co-design of these spatial conditions? The primary objective of the project is to develop scenarios for new forms of spatial practice in the context of the climate emergency. These will have broad relevance to architects and other professionals (planners, geographers, policy makers) working in spatial production, built, natural and social. It will achieve this through employing innovative methods of research, including through scenario-building workshops with multi-disciplinary groups. It will also build an open-access database of 100 international examples of how practitioners are using various approaches in the face of the climate emergency.