Tatjana M. Gluhak

Tatjana M. Gluhak
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum - Archaeological research institute | RGZ · Archaeological Sciences

PhD

About

53
Publications
7,956
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281
Citations
Citations since 2016
29 Research Items
199 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Introduction
Tatjana M. Gluhak currently works in the Archaeological Sciences Group of the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum - Leibniz Archaeological Research Institute. Tatjana does research in archaeometry, focussing on the procurement and provenance analyses of silicate rocks, but also studies ceramics and glass. Tatjana is geologist with a strong background in petrology and instrumental analytics. Currently, her main project is 'The geochemical evidence from basaltic rock tools in the southern Levant: Reconstruction of long-distance trade and exchange systems during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age I periods in Israel'. Further projects are 'Provenance Analyses of Volcanic Rock Millstones in Europe' and 'Devonian Diabase as Raw Material for Roman Ornamental Stone'.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum - Leibniz Archaeological research institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Own position in the DFG-funded project "The geochemical evidence from basaltic rock tools in the southern Levant: Reconstruction of long-distance trade and exchange systems during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age I periods in Israel"
October 2008 - September 2017
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • XRF-course Mineralogy Applied Mineralogy Geology of ore deposits Interdisciplinary Teaching Project "Archaeometry"
Education
September 2006 - March 2010
April 2001 - July 2007
October 1996 - March 2001
University of Applied Sciences Bingen
Field of study
  • Engineering for Environmental Protection

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
The discovery of an Iron Age basalt vessel workshop at Tel Hazor revealed numerous discarded preforms in different production stages. Provenance analyses allow us to reconstruct the vessels’ journey from the mining of raw material off‐site to production in the workshop. To determine the extraction sites, the geochemical compositions of the artifact...
Article
Full-text available
We present the results of a detailed geochemical provenance study of 54 Natufian (ca. 15,000–11,700 cal. BP) basalt pestles from the site of el-Wad Terrace (EWT), Israel. It is the first time precise locations from where basalt raw materials were derived are provided. The results indicate that the Natufian hunter-gatherers used multiple sources of...
Article
Full-text available
The focus of this paper are the stone tools of Çukuriçi Höyük, a prehistoric site situated at the central Aegean coast of Anatolia. The settlement was inhabited from the Neolithic, through the Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age 1 periods, a period lasting from the early 7th to the early 3rd millennium BCE. A long-term interdisciplinary study of...
Article
Full-text available
A dark green diabase of so far unknown provenance was one of the most frequently used ornamen- tal rocks in Roman Germania inferior and Gallia Belgica. A rock with similar macroscopic features was also found at more distant Roman sites in Italy and Spain. It was named granito verde a erbetta by modern Italian stone masons and vaguely attributed to...
Article
The success of provenance analyses of basaltic rock artefacts relies on the availability of comprehensive geochemical–mineralogical data from samples of geological occurrences in order to facilitate a detailed comparison of artefacts and potential raw material sources. We present new results of a geochemical study of Neogene basaltic rocks in Lower...
Conference Paper
The Olynthus millstone finds (mola trusitalis) from Siculi and Issa represent rare examples of this type of mills on the eastern Adriatic coast. They were found during archaeological excavations and surveys in and around both settlements, supporting the assumption of a close connection during the 2nd and 1st century BC, which is also suggested by s...
Conference Paper
Hourglass shaped Pompeian millstones paired with lower conical stones driven by man or donkey are emblematic of the bakeries of the Roman cities of Ostia and Pompeii. In these cities, as elsewhere in the Italian peninsula, they are made for the most part of volcanic rocks bearing leucite crystals. Their quarries have been identified in the volcanic...
Conference Paper
The millstones from the Lattara site have already been the subject of several studies (Py 1992, Raux 1999) and petrographic determinations (Dautria and Reille 1992, Reille 1999). Recent excavations have complemented our data (E. Gailledrat), especially for the most ancient phases of occupation. More than a hundred millstones were studied from the p...
Conference Paper
The stone tools of Çukuriçi Höyük, a prehistoric site situated at the central Aegean coast of Anatolia, are the focus of this paper. The settlements have been inhabited in Neolithic, Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age 1 periods, covering a time from early 7th to the early 3rd millennium BC. A long-term interdisciplinary study of the excavated s...
Conference Paper
Quarries are important traces of human activity in the field, giving insights into varying extraction techniques and strategies. The studies of quarries together with their products allow hypotheses on economic structures across times. Often threatened with destruction due to modern exploitation and difficult to access because of security or ecolog...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The reliability of provenance determinations depends on the availability of reference data from potential raw material sources. Provenance analyses do not only allow the reconstruction of the raw material sources used for tools production in antiquity, but are also crucial to locate ancient quarries and map distribution patterns of archaeological a...
Conference Paper
The late republican military camp at Hermeskeil (Trier-Saarburg district) is one of the few known heritage sites which can be dated to the Gallic Wars and can thus be linked directly to the historical record given by Caesar’s De bello Gallico. Since 2010, the site is intensively studied as part of an interdisciplinary landscape archaeological proje...
Article
Full-text available
The discovery of a basalt vessel workshop at Tel Hazor, one of the most important Iron Age sites in the Near East, marks a turning point in our understanding of stone artefact production and distribution during the 1st millennium BCE. It offers a rare opportunity to characterize ancient raw material sources, production sites, and study production,...
Article
Full-text available
Ground stone tools served in many physical and social contexts through millennia, reflecting a wide variety of functions. Although ground stone tool studies were neglected for much of early archaeology, the last few decades witnessed a notable international uptick in the way archaeologists confront this multifaceted topic. Today, with the advance o...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of a multi-disciplinary provenance study of querns and millstones during the Roman period (1st-4th century CE) in the northern part of the Roman Empire (provinces of Gallia Belgica and Germania Inferior). Comparative petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis allowed an international team of archaeologist...
Article
Full-text available
The discovery of a Neolithic quarry and production site for basanite bifacial tools at Giv‘at Kipod in Israel has provided new insights into these socially significant artefacts. Geochemical analysis of material from the quarry distinguishes it from other basaltic rock sources in Israel, allowing stone tools from a variety of sites and dated contex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ivory trade is a politically highly sensitive matter and a considerable proportion of the trade is illegal resulting in ivory to be found in different markets around Asia and Africa, but also in the US and Europe. Because of illegal ivory trade elephant populations declined in massive numbers in the 1970s and 1980s before the international trade wa...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis allowed an international team of archaeologists and geologists to identify the raw materials used for the manufacturing of millstones, whetstones, building stones and decorative stones found in the capital and agglomerations of the civitas Tungrorum (Eastern Belgium) as well as in l...
Article
Full-text available
The Upper Acheulian site of Ma‛ayan Baruch, northern Israel, is primarily known for its exceptionally large assemblage of thousands of flint handaxes. Within this assemblage, a minute collection of basalt handaxes was retrieved as well, representing particular technological choice within the Upper Acheulian. Using geochemistry, we were able to dete...
Article
The petrography as well as the major and trace element compositions of the Selinunte grinding stones, made of grey vesicular lava, were analysed. By comparison with geochemical data from volcanic rocks in the Mediterranean, we were able to determine that only a minor number of the tools were extracted from the nearest volcanics of Mount Etna and th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The term ivory summarizes teeth and tusks of different animals, which are of any commercial interest and large enough to be processed (Espinoza and Mann, 1991). Traditionally, the tusks (second upper incisors) of elephants and mammoths are referred to as the only “true” ivory. It is relatively soft and strongly favoured by artists for its carvabili...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seit tausenden von Jahren wird das sogenannte "weiße Gold" geschätzt und ist als Rohstoff für kunstvolle Schnitzereien sehr begehrt. Unter dem Oberbegriff Elfenbein werden im weiteren Sinne auch die Zähne vom Nilpferd, Walross, Narwal und Pottwal verstanden, traditionell aber wird der Begriff Elfenbein fast ausschließlich auf Stoßzähne von Elefante...
Article
In Roman times, rotary querns and different types of millstones, driven either by horse-capstan or water power, were produced in the lava quarries of the quaternary volcanic Eifel region and exported to many parts of the Empire. The geographic distribution of Roman lava millstones from the Eifel region provides important information about trade pat...
Article
Two Late Iron Age rotary querns found in Bohemia manufactured using grey, vesicular lava have been analysed typologically and geochemically with the aim to determine their provenance. Both objects match up with a typology which was developed on the basis of numerous Late Iron Age rotary querns discovered in Germany: The types of the upper and lower...
Article
For the first time a study is published which presents a petrological analysis of all Roman lava quarries in the volcanic Eifel region and which develops recommendations for a provenance analysis of millstones on the basis of the geochemical composition of the raw material. According to these recommendations, in each case two millstone samples from...
Article
Roman millstones of assumed Eifel origin were produced and exported in huge quantities to many parts of Roman Europe and can be used as tracers for trade patterns in Roman times. This study presents for the first time a raw-material centred geochemical definition of the 13 well-known Roman basaltic lava quarries in the Quaternary East and West Eife...
Article
Full-text available
We present new geochemical analyses of minerals and whole rocks for a suite of mafic rocks from the crustal section of the Othris Ophiolite in central Greece. The mafic rocks form three chemically distinct groups. Group 1 is characterized by N-MORB-type basalt and basaltic andesite with Na- and Ti-rich clinopyroxenes. These rocks show mild LREE dep...
Article
Full-text available
In Roman time millstones were extensively manufactured and exported in large quantities from different provinces of the Roman Em� pire. The Eifel with its typical basalt lava was one of the most important production places in Central Europe, the quarries of the Bellerberg volcano in Mayen were the largest Roman production sites in the Eifel region....

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Projects

Projects (8)
Project
The project aims to contribute to the understanding of the social and economic mechanisms behind long-distance trade and exchange during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age I periods of the southern Levant. The study focuses on artefacts that were selectively made from basaltic rock, which owns the potential of a clear geochemical characterisation, and thus serves as an ideal instrument for reconstructing trade and exchange systems, as well as to determine the tools' provenance. The use of basaltic rocks often meant favouring non-local raw material, which raises questions regarding the social and functional significance of this raw material, travel distances, trade routes and the nature of the social and economic mechanisms by which these items were exchanged. Selected tools from different Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age I sites in Israel will be analysed by XRF, EMP and LA-ICP-MS, to test the inter- and intra-site variability of the basaltic raw material used, dependent on tool type and dating, and to identify possible exchange localities and distributions centres. As the investigation of potential raw materials sources is imperative for conclusive provenance determinations, an intensive geochemical study of potential basalt sources will play a major role. Detailed spatial differences among the basaltic rocks in the field will be worked out, which will serve as the necessary background on which we will identify raw material sources and locate quarry and production sites.
Project
Raw materials to produce tools which were utilized in everyday life, together with the determination of their provenance plays a decisive role to promote the understanding of production, trade and distribution systems in prehistoric periods. The geochemical-mineralogical characteristics of stone tools can lead us to their raw material sources, whereas the intensive study of extraction sites provide the necessary data background to reliably determine an artefact’s provenance. The "Provenance analyses of volcanic rock grinding tools in Europe" is the header for an ongoing study since more than 11 years. Up to now, our endeavour is not funded by any foundation, but is composed of many smaller and larger cooperations with committed colleagues from all over Europe.
Archived project
The 3 year project (2010-2012) focussed on the archaeological investigation of the workshop and milling complex in Terrace House 2 of Ephesos (TR). It comprises seven mills and one stone-sawing machine. Each were powered by a waterwheel. Based on the different features, it is possible to identify three building phases. The first comprised at least two mills powered by two independent waterwheels. The second had at least one mill. In the third phase five waterwheels drove four mills and one stone-sawing machine. In addition, it is possible to distinguish between two different types of waterwheel constructions.