Tara Teel

Tara Teel
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Doctor of Philosophy

About

91
Publications
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3,776
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Publications

Publications (91)
Article
Human-wildlife conflict ( HWC ) is a global phenomenon with serious implications for biodiversity conservation and human well-being. Innovative solutions demand greater attention to the social factors contributing to HWC , including human thought and behavior, which can be examined through the lens of social psychology. Using the case of human-coyo...
Article
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Rapid, widespread changes in public perceptions and behaviors have the potential to influence conservation outcomes. However, few studies have documented whether and how such shifts occur throughout the span of a conservation initiative. We examined the 2020 ballot initiative to reintroduce wolves into Colorado, which passed with less support than...
Article
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The future viability of wildlife conservation in the United States hinges on the field's ability to adapt to changing social–ecological conditions including shifting societal values and mounting pressures to engage a greater diversity of voices in decision‐making. As wildlife agencies respond to calls to broaden their relevance amid such changes, t...
Article
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Calls for organizational change have pervaded wildlife conservation in recent decades, driven by a shift in values that is reshaping the social landscape of wildlife management. As this process unfolds, wildlife agencies in North America seek new ways to remain relevant, focusing primarily on how they might expand support for their ongoing work. Le...
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A growing body of literature has highlighted the value of social science for conservation, yet the diverse approaches of the social sciences are still inconsistently incorporated in conservation initiatives. Building greater capacity for social science integration in conservation requires frameworks and case studies that provide concrete guidance a...
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Wild pigs (Sus scrofa) pose significant challenges to wildlife managers. This research explored Texas hunters’ acceptability of wild pig control actions, and whether acceptability varied according to hunters’ affiliation with four different categories of natural resource organizations as an indicator of social identity. Results of a survey (n = 37,...
Article
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Wild pigs (Sus scrofa) damage agriculture and the environment, as well as transmit diseases to animals and people. Hunters are particularly vulnerable to zoonotic disease risks when harvesting wild pigs. Management agencies have endeavored to inform the public about disease risks associated with wild pigs and best practices for mitigating such risk...
Article
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Humans regularly exert a powerful influence on the survival and persistence of species, yet social‐science information is used only sporadically in conservation decisions. Using data obtained from a survey of 46,894 US residents, we developed and applied a spatially explicit “sociocultural index” to inform decision making through an understanding o...
Article
Invasive species and their establishment in new areas have significant impacts on the ecological, economic, and social well-being of our planet. Wild pigs (Sus scrofa) are one of the world's most formidable invasive species, particularly in the United States. They cause significant damage to agriculture and ecosystems, and can transmit diseases to...
Article
Transdisciplinary research is a promising approach to address sustainability challenges arising from global environmental change, as it is characterized by an iterative process that brings together actors from multiple academic fields and diverse sectors of society to engage in mutual learning with the intent to co-produce new knowledge. We present...
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Global biodiversity loss is indicative of the massive influence of human activity that defines the Anthropocene. Some scholars argue that changes in behaviour at the scale necessary to address this crisis will require wholesale change in cultural values. However, evidence is lacking on whether values are shifting. To better understand this phenomen...
Article
While relatively little is known about bats across much of Africa, globally, many bat populations are in decline due to human activities. Successful bat conservation efforts, therefore, depend on both ecological studies and research on human-bat relationships. To address these knowledge gaps about African bats and their interactions with humans, we...
Article
Cities are important sites for encouraging more widespread adoption of pro-environmental behaviors (PEB) that benefit humans and wildlife alike. Wildscaping, a type of stewardship PEB in which people create wildlife-friendly gardens, has been promoted by conservation organizations, yet fundamental questions remain about what wildscaping entails and...
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A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-020-00675-2
Article
Conflicts between people and wild animals are increasing globally, often with serious consequences for both. Local regulations or ordinances are frequently used to promote human behaviors that minimize these conflicts (risk-reducing behaviors), but compliance with ordinances can be highly variable. While efforts to increase compliance could be impr...
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As an apex predator, pumas (Puma concolor) frequently enter into conflict with humans because of predation on livestock. We analyzed the association between puma predation and human tolerance in six agroecosystems of the Argentine Dry Chaco, a global deforestation hotspot. Specifically, we addressed attitudes and behaviors of local social actors to...
Article
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In the state of Colorado, a citizen ballot initiative to reintroduce gray wolves (Canis Lupus) is eliciting polarization and conflict among multiple stakeholder and interest groups. Given this complex social landscape, we examined the social context surrounding wolf reintroduction in Colorado as of 2019. We used an online survey of 734 Coloradans r...
Article
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We introduced a multilevel model of value shift to describe the changing social context of wildlife conservation. Our model depicts how cultural-level processes driven by modernization (e.g., increased wealth, education, and urbanization) affect changes in individual-level cognition that prompt a shift from domination to mutualism wildlife values....
Article
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Conservation leadership science has focused on identifying behaviors and characteristics that make individual leaders effective, but has yet to address contextual challenges that differentially shape various groups' pathways to leadership positions. We sought to understand one such challenge, how motherhood affects women's careers, by conducting in...
Article
on the landscape, yet the relative importance of factors affecting tolerance is not fully understood. Further, the impact of management efforts to alter tolerance has not been adequately assessed. We developed a model containing a comprehensive set of predictors drawn from prior studies and tested it through a longitudinal survey measuring toleranc...
Article
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Seeing wildlife in natural habitat is an exciting and powerful experience for national park visitors but is risky for visitors and wildlife alike. National parks have long used educational approaches to inspire visitors to engage in conservation behavior and protect themselves from harm. With record visitation in recent years, national parks must h...
Article
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Integrating social and ecological knowledge is requisite for solutions to global conservation problems, including human–wildlife conflict, but gathering sufficient data to facilitate integration has proved difficult. Social–ecological systems models have also traditionally overlooked individual human thought and behavior that can affect the success...
Article
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Human-wildlife conflicts are increasing globally, especially involving livestock depredation by carnivores. To understand the relationship between predation frequency and attitudes toward predators, researchers quantified livestock losses for four carnivore species—African wild dog, spotted hyena, leopard, and lion—as well as attitudes toward these...
Chapter
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This chapter briefly discusses a descriptive typology of attitudes towards wildlife that was quite influential in the pioneering years of research on human dimensions of wildlife. It describes a more recent theory‐driven approach to understanding human relationships with wildlife, guided by the cognitive hierarchy. The theory of cognitive hierarchy...
Article
There is growing recognition that interdisciplinary approaches that account for both ecological and social processes are necessary to successfully address human-wildlife interactions. However, such approaches are hindered by challenges in aligning data types, communicating across disciplines, and applying social science information to conservation...
Preprint
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Despite broad recognition of the value of social sciences and increasingly vocal calls for better engagement with the human element of conservation, the conservation social sciences remain misunderstood and underutilized in practice. The conservation social sciences can provide unique and important contributions to society's understanding of the re...
Preprint
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It has long been claimed that a better understanding of human or social dimensions of environmental issues will improve conservation. The social sciences are one important means through which researchers and practitioners can attain that better understanding. Yet, a lack of awareness of the scope and uncertainty about the purpose of the conservatio...
Article
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We conducted a systematic literature review to analyze evaluations of conservation education programs on a global scale in order to better understand (1) temporal and spatial trends in conservation education program evaluations over the last 25 years, (2) patterns in the types of conservation-related issues addressed through these programs, (3) met...
Article
Article impact statement: Conservation values are unlikely to change through intentional efforts.
Article
The global rise of populism is having a profound effect on policies across many issues. We explore the potential effects on wildlife conservation using the western United States as a case study. Global populist trends have been explained through the phenomenon of cultural backlash, wherein those left behind in the value shift beginning post-World W...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been claimed that a better understanding of human or social dimensions of environmental issues will improve conservation. The social sciences are one important means through which researchers and practitioners can attain that better understanding. Yet, a lack of awareness of the scope and uncertainty about the purpose of the conservatio...
Article
Full-text available
The hope for creating widespread change in social values has endured among conservation professionals since early calls by Aldo Leopold for a “Land Ethic”. However, there has been little serious attention in conservation to the fields of investigation that address values, how they are formed, and how they change. We introduce a social-ecological sy...
Article
Full-text available
Despite broad recognition of the value of social sciences and increasingly vocal calls for better engagement with the human element of conservation, the conservation social sciences remain misunderstood and underutilized in practice. The conservation social sciences can provide unique and important contributions to society's understanding of the re...
Article
Limited funds for wildlife conservation require difficult choices about allocation of resources. One consideration is public preferences. While traditional attitudinal approaches can provide information about preferences for conservation efforts aimed at individual species, stated choice models offer a more suitable approach for exploring the compl...
Article
To improve the effectiveness of conservation solutions that depend on public support, conservationists are increasingly relying on social science that explores the factors influencing human thought and behavior. One line of research stemming from social psychology that is often applied to conservation focuses on the role of social values (core huma...
Article
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This article reports on the development and implementation of a qualitative methodology to measure wildlife value orientations (WVOs) in a focus group setting, with the ultimate goal of developing a technique to help with cross-cultural assessments of WVOs. Information provided by such assessments can assist conservation organizations in understand...
Article
Free-ranging domestic cats (Felis catus) incur and impose risks on ecosystems and represent a complex issue of critical importance to biodiversity conservation and cat and human health globally. Prior social science research on this topic is limited and has emphasized feral cats even though owned cats often comprise a large proportion of the outdoo...
Article
Large-scale change in human values and associated behavior change is believed by some to be the ultimate solution to achieve global biodiversity conservation. Yet little is known about the dynamics of values. We contribute to this area of inquiry by examining, as a case example, the trajectory of values affecting views of wildlife in North America....
Technical Report
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Each of the fields of conservation social science has made and can make a unique contribution to understanding the relationship between humans and nature and to improving conservation outcomes. Conservation scientists, practitioners and organizations recognize the importance of the conservation social sciences and are increasingly engaging in and f...
Article
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As American society diversifies, and the public interest in natural resources broadens, it is essential that wildlife agencies find ways to better understand and engage increasingly diverse audiences. Wildlife value orientations (WVO) is a concept that addresses this need by augmenting understanding of the different ways people perceive wildlife re...
Conference Paper
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Recently, there has been growing interest in the study of the biology of free-ranging cats and their effects on wildlife, generating new estimates of cat densities and predation rates. Although such biological data are important to consider when formulating management strategies, they have done little to stifle conflict between stakeholder groups o...
Article
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In many cities throughout North America, human–coyote conflicts are an emerging problem. Little research has described temporal and spatial patterns of human–coyote conflicts, although such information can be an important step in developing and optimizing management efforts. We used reports from 22 entities within the Denver Metropolitan Area (DMA)...
Chapter
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The most troubling problems in conservation - deforestation, land degradation, biodiversity loss, and climate change - Are difficult to isolate and examine as independent phenomena. Increasingly, the view from science casts these as outcomes from complex interactions within and between human society and its biophysical context. Reductionist science...
Article
The purpose of this case study was to: (1) assess whether a group of 12 students from a rural Hawai’ian community acquired local environmental knowledge through a place-based environmental education program, and (2) determine how integration of cultural information into this program affected participants’ views about their natural world. A tertiary...
Article
In some industrialized countries, recreational fishing has come under moral pressure. To understand potential ramifications, we first describe three dominant philosophies of human-animal interactions (i.e., animal welfare, animal liberation, and animal rights). We contend that, as long as fishing and handling practices are as fish friendly as possi...
Article
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This study examines the integration of environmental education (EE) into an after-school program in the Bronx borough of New York City. In this qualitative case study, focus group interviews were conducted to first determine parent and educator interest in and barriers to participation in nature programs and incorporation of EE into curriculum. In-...
Article
Similar to making purchasing decisions, people's support for wildlife management actions can be influenced by various tradeoffs and contextual factors. Using conjoint analyses, we assessed the relative importance of three factors associated with possible management actions for reducing human-related impacts on sea turtle nesting in Ogasawara Island...
Article
We used a multiple-satisfaction approach to assess demand for elk hunting opportunities in Colorado. We used a mail-out instrument and follow-up telephone interview to contact a random sample of resident and nonresident Colorado elk (Cervus elaphus) hunters (n = 1,618). The majority of elk hunters preferred rifle hunts that maximize hunting frequen...
Article
Balancing wildlife management trade-offs is likely to result in differential impacts and varying levels of support among stakeholders. Science should guide discourse regarding these trade-offs, and science can, in turn, quantify the discourse to inform management. This study developed a unique visual-based instrument to explain complex trade-offs t...
Article
Wildlife is a critical component of protected areas worldwide. It can serve not only as a primary attraction or an enjoyable part of the visitor experience but also as a source of conflict. Managing wildlife in this context requires a broadbased approach that can account for the myriad factors underlying conservation effectiveness, including the na...
Article
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Natural resource agencies in the United States have a huge responsibility to protect and manage public lands as well as effectively communicate with diverse publics about land management issues. One of these issues is how best to deal with the impacts of climate change on our nation’s treasured landscapes. Fortunately, a recent surge of research an...
Article
North American state wildlife agencies are increasingly faced with the challenge of effectively representing a diverse public. With increasing social conflict over wildlife issues, the future of wildlife conservation hinges on preparedness of the profession to respond to this challenge. In the interest of finding ways to improve response, 19 agenci...