Tara G McAllister

Tara G McAllister
University of Auckland · Te Pūnaha Matatini

PhD

About

24
Publications
4,359
Reads
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290
Citations

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
This paper responds to calls from past and present students to increase the value of postgraduate scholarships in Aotearoa New Zealand. Here we provide context for understanding the scholarship landscape in Aotearoa, including how scholarships are understood in relation to dominant neoliberal framings of higher education and persistent inequities w...
Article
We are a diverse collective of researchers who are committed to improving the health and wellbeing of marginalised individuals. This article is a response to, and critique of, the DentalSlim Diet Control research. This device revises a controversial 1970s weight-loss technology connected to poor health outcomes, which is indicative of a culture tha...
Preprint
This paper responds to calls from past and present students to increase the value of postgraduate scholarships in Aotearoa New Zealand. Here we provide context for understanding the scholarship landscape in Aotearoa, including how scholarships are understood in relation to dominant neoliberal framings of higher education and persistent inequities w...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing employee access to paid parental leave (PPL) is an important step to achieving gender equity in higher education. Although Aotearoa/New Zealand has recently increased PPL to the 26 weeks recommended by the World Health Organisation, the level of payment is capped at below minimum wage. For parents working or seeking to work at universiti...
Article
The continued underserving of Māori and Pasifika communities by New Zealand universities has resulted in the need to hold universities and the wider tertiary education system to account through widespread data analysis. This paper analyses Māori and Pasifika enrolment in the Society and Culture and Natural and Physical Sciences fields of Aotearoa N...
Article
Māori and Pacific academics make up less than 4% and 1% respectively of New Zealand professors. We investigated ethnic inequities in promotions and earnings in New Zealand universities. Using New Zealand’s Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) data (2003, 2012, 2018) we found that Māori and Pacific men and also women academics, compared with non-M...
Article
This article provides insights into the ethnicity of people employed in Aotearoa New Zealand’s publicly-funded scientific workforce, with a particular focus on Māori and Pasifika scientists. We show that between 2008 and 2018, Māori and Pasifika scientists were severely under-represented in Aotearoa New Zealand’s universities and crown-research ins...
Article
Full-text available
• This review summarises knowledge on the ecology, toxin production, and impacts of toxic freshwater benthic cyanobacterial proliferations. It documents monitoring, management, and sampling strategies, and explores mitigation options. • Toxic proliferations of freshwater benthic cyanobacteria (taxa that grow attached to substrates) occur in streams...
Article
Full-text available
In light of policies and programs designed to address the domination of academic positions by male, frequently white individuals, we review the participation of women, one of multiple minority identities within the academy, in Aotearoa New Zealand’s academic workforce using employment data from eight universities from 2002–2017. While the number of...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the academic ‘pipeline’ for Māori and Pasifika graduates and illustrate the chronic under-representation of Māori and Pasifika in permanent academic positions in New Zealand universities. We identify areas within higher education where significant opportunities are being lost for the recruitment and retention of Māori and Pasifika. The n...
Article
Proliferations of the toxic, mat-forming cyanobacterium Microcoleus autumnalis are an increasingly recognized problem in cobble-bed rivers worldwide. This study explored how flow and nutrient concentrations influence mat expansion. Microcoleus autumnalis was inoculated into cobbles placed in runs, riffles, and pools in three rivers with different n...
Article
Full-text available
Proliferations of benthic cyanobacteria in the genus Phormidium are a global concern because of their increasing prevalence and ability to produce harmful toxins. Most studies have been observational and have linked physicochemical variables to Phormidium cover measured at the reach scale. Authors of these studies have alluded to nutrients and flow...
Thesis
Full-text available
Over the last two decades there has been a marked increase in the intensity and frequency of proliferations of the benthic, mat-forming cyanobacterial genus Phormidium in rivers worldwide. This has raised concerns because species of Phormidium are known to produce a variety of cyanotoxins, including; anatoxin-a, homoanatoxin-a, dihydro-anatoxin-a a...
Article
Toxic benthic cyanobacterial proliferations, particularly of the genus Phormidium, are a major concern in many countries due to their increasing extent and severity. The aim of this study was to improve the current understanding of the dominant physicochemical variables associated with high Phormidium cover and toxin concentrations. Phormidium cove...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster outlines the development of a novel substrate stability assessment index, and demonstrates how the index may be capable of predicting periphyton accrual.
Poster
Full-text available
This poster outlines the development of a novel substrate stability assessment index, and demonstrates how the index may be capable of predicting periphyton accrual.
Article
Full-text available
Proliferations of the benthic mat-forming cyanobacteria Phormidium have been reported in rivers worldwide. Phormidium commonly produces natural toxins which pose a health risk to animal and humans. Recent field studies in New Zealand identified that sites with Phormidium proliferations consistently have low concentrations of water column dissolved...

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