Tanja Roembke

Tanja Roembke
RWTH Aachen University · Institute for Psychology

About

14
Publications
4,041
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96
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
90 Citations
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Introduction
The goal of my research is to study language learning, how it is influenced by factors in the environment and how such learning differs across development. In addition, I investigate how learned information is accessed in-the-moment during language processing. At RWTH Aachen University, I have expanded my research to include language processing and acquisition in bilingual speakers.
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Multilinguals often switch between the languages they speak. One open question is to what extent they can use anticipatory—or proactive—language control to reduce interference from non-target languages during language switching. In three experiments, unbalanced German-English bilinguals (N1 = 24; N2 = 35; N3 = 37) named pictures in their L1 or L2 i...
Article
Full-text available
It is increasingly understood that people may learn new word/object mappings in part via a form of statistical learning in which they track co-occurrences between words and objects across situations (cross-situational learning). Multiple learning processes contribute to this, thought to reflect the simultaneous influence of real-time hypothesis tes...
Article
Many middle-school students struggle with basic reading skills. One reason for this might be a lack of automaticity in word-level lexical processes. To investigate this, we used a novel backward masking paradigm, in which a written word is either covered with a mask or not. Participants (N = 444 [after exclusions]; nfemale = 264, nmale = 180) were...
Preprint
Both explicit and implicit learning processes contribute to cross-situational word learning (e.g., Roembke & McMurray, 2016; Warren et al., 2019). However, it is unclear how these learning processes interact, and if any specific aspect of cross-situational word learning is purely explicit. To investigate this, participants completed cross-situation...
Article
Full-text available
Word learning requires learners to bind together arbitrarily-related phonological, visual, and conceptual information. Prior work suggests that this binding can be robustly achieved via incidental cross-situational statistical exposure to words and referents. When cross-situational statistical learning (CSSL) is tested in the laboratory, there is n...
Article
Full-text available
To mark the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we asked young scientists this question: What one thing would you change about the training or careers in your field to improve accessibility for people with visible and/or invisible disabilities? A selection of their responses is below. Follow NextGen Voices on Twitter with hasht...
Article
Many details in reading curricula (e.g., the order of materials) have analogs in laboratory studies of learning (e.g., blocking/interleaving). Principles of learning from cognitive science could be used to structure these materials to optimize learning, but they are not commonly applied. Recent work bridges this gap by “field testing” such principl...
Preprint
Full-text available
An important component of learning to read is the acquisition of letter-to-sound- mappings. The sheer quantity of mappings and many exceptions suggests that children may use a form of statistical learning to acquire them. However, while statistical models of reading are item-based, reading instruction typically focuses on rule-based approaches invo...
Article
Considerable debate in language acquisition concerns whether word learning is driven by domain-general (symbolically flexible) or domain-specific learning mechanisms. Prior work has shown that very young children can map objects to either words or nonlinguistic sounds, but by 20 months of age this ability narrows to only words. This suggests that a...
Article
Automaticity in word recognition has been hypothesized to be important in reading development (LaBerge & Samuels, 1974; Perfetti, 1985). However, when predicting educational outcomes, it is difficult to isolate the influence of automatic word recognition from factors such as processing speed or knowledge of grapheme-phoneme correspondences. Cogniti...
Article
Adaptive behaviors are believed to be shaped by both positive (the strengthening of correct associations) and negative (the pruning of incorrect associations or the building of inhibitory associations) forms of associative learning. However, there has been little direct documentation of how these basic processes participate in the learning of rich...

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