Tanfer Emin Tunc

Tanfer Emin Tunc
Hacettepe University · Department of American Culture and Literature

Doctor of Philosophy
Professor of American Studies, Hacettepe University

About

155
Publications
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118
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Introduction
Prof. Tunc holds a BA, MA and PhD in U.S. history from Stony Brook University. She has received grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, Princeton University, Rockefeller University, Duke University, the University of Michigan, Smith College, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and the Hastings Center for Bioethics and Public Policy. She is Vice President of the American Studies Association of Turkey and a Board Member of the European Association for American Studies.

Publications

Publications (155)
Article
This article argues that Margaret Abigail Cleaves’s The Autobiography of a Neurasthene was part of a body of nineteenth-century writing that attempted to reclaim and recover the voices of American women by chronicling their struggles with illnesses and cures and documenting their interactions with the medical profession. Cleaves’s gynocentric count...
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While fetal surgery—and pregnancy termination as a possible therapeutic alternative—have been examined in a number of studies, very few have addressed the issues and tensions that arise when prenatal surgery is considered from the standpoint of Disability Studies. This article will expose these concerns by tracing the medical development of fetal s...
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In 1946, Turkish entrepreneur Vehbi Koç signed an agreement with the U.S. firm General Electric to build and operate its first light bulb factory in the Near/Middle East, in Istanbul. This private joint venture introduced new manufacturing techniques, business practices, and consumer habits to Turkey, opening channels of postwar technological excha...
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In 1933, Louise Spieker Rankin published the first edition of An American Cookbook for India, a recipe and household manual for American women who, like herself, found themselves living as expatriates in India with little or no prior knowledge of domestic life in subcontinental Asia. While Rankin’s cookbook builds upon the preexisting body of Anglo...
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A pioneer of women in advertising and television media, Paula Green (1927–2015) is arguably best remembered for her copy for the Avis “We Try Harder” campaign that revolutionized Madison Avenue in the 1960s. While Green certainly flourished at Doyle Dane Bernbach, by the end of the decade, she had reached the highest position available to her at th...
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This ethnographic study seeks to position Turkish women within the lucrative global bridal industry, which is today heavily influenced by the style, aesthetics and consumer values of the American wedding. It will add to the existing literature by examining Turkish brides’ participation in transnational networks that promote the commodification of w...
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Celia Marshik and Allison Pease's Modernism, Sex, and Gender (2018) is a sourcebook for modernist studies that extends and revises some of the classics in the field. It provides an in-depth consideration of the historiography of gender, sex, and sexuality, while suggesting topics for future research within the field. With its extensive bibliographi...
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On 27 December 1939, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Erzincan, Turkey, claiming close to 33,000 lives, and leaving 100,000 injured and 250,000 homeless. World War II was in its initial stages, and the United States was particularly concerned about the vulnerable situation in Turkey, since there was a possibility that it would join forces with Ger...
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With an area of 1.3 km2 or 320 acres, Wonderland Eurasia, which is located in Ankara, Turkey, has been advertised as the largest theme park in Europe and Asia. Almost a decade in the making, it was completed in 2019 at a cost of approximately $250 to $350 million USD (1.5 to 2 billion Turkish Lira) and is seen by supporters as having the potential...
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For the first half of the twentieth century, Thompson-Starrett and Co., a New York-based American engineering, construction, and contracting firm, dominated the building scene. In operation between 1899 and 1968, it was a leader in skyscraper construction and large-scale projects, and literally built the New York skyline. It designed and constructe...
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As Robert Azzarello expresses in Three Hundred Years of Decadence, when embodied in human form, decadence evokes a tableau of pleasure, indulgence, and excess – a decadent is someone ‘who has had too much – too much nicotine or caffeine, too much liquor or morphine, too much literature or philosophy or art – and is thus reduced to a state of being...
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This essay investigates what we call "food feminism"—a type of activism that resists and subverts the ways in which American institutions, especially science, industry, and the legal system, dominate women and what they eat; empowers women to seek alternatives to commercialized and processed food; and encourages reform and change in American nutrit...
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This article explores the travel writing of Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840–1924), a Boston socialite who, over the course of nearly thirty years (1867–1895), toured the world and documented her trips through journals, albums and extensive correspondence with confidants such as novelist Henry James. It argues that because of its transgressive elemen...
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Poised to be one of the more controversial recent contributions to the cultural study of food, S. Margot Finn’s Discriminating Taste focuses on debunking the contemporary food movement’s most sacred beliefs; namely, ‘that gourmet food tastes better, thinness is healthier, organic and locally grown foods are more sustainable and ethical, and the lit...
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Edited by Christine Flanagan, The Letters of Flannery O’Connor and Caroline Gordon traces the remarkable friendship of two of the most prominent women of southern letters through more than a decade of correspondence and supplemental documentation that adds significant dimension to their relationship. Although attempts to collect, edit, and antholog...
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Renée M. Sentilles’s American Tomboys, 1850–1915 is a refreshing study of an understudied gender identity—the tomboy—from the antebellum period to World War I. Divided into seven chapters, it surveys the development of the tomboy as a cultural, literary and historical figure and her transformation from a gender anomaly to the “all-American” girl. S...
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Over the past decade or so, the study of food museums has emerged out of larger disciplines such as food studies, memory studies, museology, hospitality management, culinary tourism, and travel and leisure studies as its own area of inquiry. Food museums have existed for decades, but are increasing in popularity in the United States and globally, b...
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In 1975, the organisers of the International Women’s Year (IWY) Conference in Mexico City boldly proclaimed it ‘the greatest consciousness-raising event in history’ – a very ambitious claim that serves as the focal point of Jocelyn Olcott’s latest work. In International Women’s Year, she argues that the United Nations-sponsored event, which spanned...
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Queer history has traditionally been written through an urban-centered epistemology, focusing on the lives and work of city dwellers and “cosmopolitan radicals”—a narrow lens that theorist Jack Halberstam calls “metronormativity.” Emily Skidmore’s True Sex challenges the existing transgender historiography by arguing that at the turn of the twentie...
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New Desires, New Selves is a sociological window into the sexual attitudes of Turkish youth through a cohort of 87 students from Bogazici University (a public institution in Istanbul) interviewed between 2002 and 2006. As Ozyegin asserts, the subjects represent a range of backgrounds, political persuasions, and levels of religiosity (though non-Mus...
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Cookbooks and Foodoirs: Narrating the Self and the Nation through Cuisine.” Reviews in American History 47.1 (2019): 104–110.
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Susan Falls’s White Gold offers an intriguing autoethnographic window into a world that most Americans know very little about: the network of breast milk sharing that exists in the United States. An anthropologist by training, Falls was personally drawn into this world when she required assistance feeding her adopted son. Her doula advised against...
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In A Study of Scarletts: Scarlett O’Hara and Her Literary Daughters, Margaret Donovan Bauer deploys a classic of southern literature—Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind (1936)—as the framework of her literary analysis, which takes as its focus the significance of female solidarity and sisterhood in four other twentieth-century southern novels: C...
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Ilana Lowy’s Imperfect Pregnancies is one of the latest additions to the rapidly-expanding literature on the history of reproductive technologies and, specifically, prenatal diagnosis. In this work, Lo¨wy examines how the search for foetal abnormalities has transformed from a diagnostic protocol once reserved for older parturients and women with a...
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In 1964, a diet presented itself that would not only allow American men to recapture their fading youth and health through trimmer bodies, but would also permit them to reclaim their disappearing post-war social power through a reassertion of heteronormative hegemonic masculinity. Called The Drinking Man’s Diet: How to Lose Weight with a Minimum of...
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We are delighted to welcome you to the inaugural issue of WiN: The EAAS Women’s Network Journal, our double-blind peer-reviewed online journal published by the European Association for American Studies’ Women’s Network. Like the EAAS Women’s Network, WiN seeks to enhance cooperation among European Americanists who are engaged in the scholarly explo...
Book
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The essays in Chop Suey and Sushi from Sea to Shining Sea fill gaps in the existing food studies literature by revealing and contextualizing the hidden, local histories of Chinese and Japanese restaurants in the United States. The writers of these essays show how the taste and presentation of Chinese and Japanese dishes have evolved in sweat and ha...
Chapter
The 1940s to the 1970s is a significant timeframe within the history of Asian/American foreign relations because it represents a period of intense interaction between “East” and “West,” specifically through World War II (Japan), the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, increasing fears about Red China and communism in general, and eventually...
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Barbara Katz Rothman’s A Bun in the Oven is a tale of two social movements – the food and the birth movements – and how their members, or as Rothman calls them ‘foodies’ and ‘birthies’, have resisted and subverted external attempts (usually by professionals) to industrialize, co-opt and control their efforts. In this work, Rothman draws on her deca...
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When New York writer Laurie Colwin is remembered, it is usually for her numerous novels and short stories. However, between the mid-1980s and her death in 1992 at the age of forty-eight, she also wrote for Gourmet magazine, and published two volumes of food writing: Home Cooking: A Writer in the Kitchen (1988) and More Home Cooking: A Writer Return...
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Suzanne Turner, ed. The Garden Diary of Martha Turnbull, Mistress of Rosedown Plantation.” Material Culture 50.1 (2018): 80–82.
Presentation
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Sentimental cartography, a type of satirical mapping, "portray[s] worlds and regions of the mind, rather than the geography of the physical world" (Reitinger 1999). It takes the familiar and makes it unfamiliar by including metaphorical and allegorical expressions of political opinion and cultural critique, or by expressing complex beliefs. Moreove...
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This article discusses how, following in the footsteps of United States imperial children’s writers Jacob Abbott and Edward Stratemeyer, Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade (1860–1936), the original author of the Our Little Cousins series (1901–1905), contributed to the American culture of empire. Wade was one of the most prolific and popular imperialisti...
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Discovered in the mid-1990s in a descendant’s attic, the garden diary of plantation mistress Martha Turnbull (1809–96) provides a window into life as it existed in the nineteenth century at Rosedown Plantation in St. Francisville, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. Spanning almost sixty years between 1836 and 1895, the diary presents layers of first...
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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07409710.2017.1311159
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The diary of Johanna Louisa ‘Josie’ Underwood (1840–1923), the daughter of Kentucky lawyer, politician and plantation owner Warner Underwood, portrays what happened to many elite households in Kentucky during the American Civil War (1861–1865), especially with its depiction of food as a scarce, and thus increasingly valuable, resource. Spanning the...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on how nineteenth-century criminal abortion narratives aggrandized the authority of the American medical and legal systems by deploying technical “scientific” information, which granted these organizing professionals the social influence to control pregnancy termination and maintain its criminality until Roe v. Wade (1973). Kno...
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Eating Words is the latest book from Sandra M. Gilbert, the feminist literary critic who in recent years has segued into food writing, most notably with The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity (2014), which surveys how food is represented in literature, art, and popular culture. Co-edited with restaurant critic and English professor Roger...
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A History of American Civil War Literature is a collection of twenty-two essays, edited by Coleman Hutchison, that surveys the writing of the Civil War era and twentieth-century literary interpretations of the conflict. The volume is divided into three sections—“Contexts,” “Genres,” and “Figures”—covering a wide range of Civil War works and authors...
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Courtney Q. Shah, Sex Ed, Segregated: The Quest for Sexual Knowledge in Progressive-Era America.” Amerikastudien/American Studies 62.1 (2017).
Article
This study explores the women's archives of Turkey and the United States, comparing not only their origins and content, but also their social and political goals. It includes an analysis of key Turkish and US women's archives in order to excavate the transnational discourses that lie between the pages. Sometimes this information is readily apparent...
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Kara W. Swanson, Banking on the Body: The Market in Blood, Milk, and Sperm in Modern America.” Medical History 60.1 (2016): 119–121.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Claude S. Fischer, Made in America: A Social History of American Culture and Character.” Journal of American Studies of Turkey 43 (2016): 97–100.
Conference Paper
This conference paper analyzes works by Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade--specifically Our Little Brown Cousin (1901), Our Little Japanese Cousin (1901), Our Little African Cousin (1902), Our Little Siamese Cousin (1903), Our Little Jewish Cousin (1904), Our Little Turkish Cousin (1904), Our Little Armenian Cousin (1905), and others--not examined in my...
Article
This essay evaluates the reproductive discourse in Fitzgerald's work by examining the depiction of birth control and abortion in two of his short stories, “Salute to Lucie and Elsie” (unpublished) and “Benediction” (1920), and two of his novels, The Beautiful and Damned and Tender Is the Night. While Fitzgerald's deployment of reproductive narrativ...
Article
This essay evaluates the reproductive discourse in Fitzgerald's work by examining the depiction of birth control and abortion in two of his short stories, “Salute to Lucie and Elsie” (unpublished) and “Benediction” (1920), and two of his novels, The Beautiful and Damned and Tender Is the Night. While Fitzgerald's deployment of reproductive narrativ...
Chapter
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “The Construction of a Transnational Feminist: Latife Hanim in the American Press, 1923–1925.” The West in Asia and Asia in the West: Essays on Transnational Interactions. Eds. Elisabetta Marino and Tanfer Emin Tunc. Jefferson: McFarland Publishers, 2015. 60–78.
Article
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “‘Ropa Carmagin’: A Speculative Essay on Margaret Mitchell’s Lost ‘Race Novella.’” Australasian Journal of American Studies 34.1 (2015): 30–42. https://www.jstor.org/stable/44779751
Book
Full-text available
Tunc, Tanfer Emin and Elisabetta Marino, eds. The West in Asia and Asia in the West: Essays on Transnational Interactions. Jefferson: McFarland Publishers, 2015. ISBN: 978-0-7864-9473-6
Article
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Paul Green’s South: Gothic Modernism in The House of Connelly.” North Carolina Literary Review 24 (2015): 84–97.
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Walter Sullivan (1924–2006), a Nashville, Tennessee native who spent most of his academic and professional life at Vanderbilt University, is generally considered by critics as a literary descendent of the first two generations of Fugitive-Agrarians and the Southern Renaissance to which they belong. This essay seeks to position Sullivan’s second, la...
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The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond (1957) functions as a searing retort against the American medical model which, for decades, demonized drug and alcohol users by labeling them as “disabled”; medicalized social “deviants”; pathologized sexual preference; and attempted to eradicate physical, psychological, and sexual non-normativity through eugenics. By...
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In Broadcasting Birth Control, Manon Parry departs from the traditional narrative of contraceptive history, which focuses on leaders and organisations, to shed light on an underexamined aspect of the story of family planning: its treatment in mainstream American popular culture, specifically in the media. One would imagine that such a private aspec...
Article
When asked to elaborate on the “Negro Problem,” or the co-existence of racial inequality and democracy in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century, African American historian W. E. B. Du Bois conveyed that the “’Negro problem’ of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” Kelly Miller, his contemporary and fellow Na...
Article
Nuclear anxiety, as crafted and perpetuated by the United States Federal Civil Defense Administration's programmes, not only informed how, and what, Americans ate in the 1950s, but also contoured their relationship with food. This culinary-based nuclear anxiety was reflected in government-sponsored programmes such as Grandma's Pantry, advice concer...
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As the old adage goes, “never judge a book by its cover.” However, as an historian of abortion and its technologies, I was immediately intrigued by the cover of Michelle Murphy’s Seizing the Means of Reproduction: Entanglements of Feminism, Health, and Technoscience for two reasons: its clever, patterned use of the Del-Em apparatus, a homemade mens...
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The Flexner Report of 1910 represented the culmination of the movement to professionalize medicine that had begun with the establishment of the American Medical Association (AMA) in 1847. This movement, which was dominated by white male physicians from major US cities, involved the “purification” of the field through the elimination of “irregular”...
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Full-text available
Walter Sullivan (1924-2006), a Nashville, Tennessee native who spent most of his academic and professional life at Vanderbilt University, is generally considered by critics as a literary descendent of the first two generations of Fugitive-Agrarians and the Southern Renaissance to which they belong. This essay seeks to position Sullivan's second, la...
Chapter
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Pollyanna in Turkey: Translating a Transnational Icon.” Eleanor H. Porter’s Pollyanna: A Children’s Classic at 100. Eds. Roxanne Harde and Lydia Kokkola. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2014. 246–262.
Chapter
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “(Re)Presenting the Past: Bid Time Return as Historiographic Metafiction.” Reading Richard Matheson: A Critical Survey. Eds. Cheyenne Mathews and Janet V. Haedicke. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2014. 197–209.
Book
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin and Meldan Tanrisal. The Health of the Nation (European Views of the United States Series, Volume 6). Heidelberg: Universitatsverlag Winter, 2014. ISBN: 978-3-8253-6322-2
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Tea and Bee’s Milk: The American Expatriate Experience in Gocek, Mugla.” 3. Uluslararasi Her Yonuyle Bodrum Sempozyumu Bildiriler, Cilt 2 (Third International Symp. on Bodrum Proceedings, Vol. 2), eds. Akif Erdogru and Ahmet Ozgiray. Izmir: Ege Uni. Press, 2014. 851–865.
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Tunc, Tanfer E. “‘Ashley Wilkes Told Me He Likes to See a Girl with a Healthy Appetite’: Food and Drink in Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind.” Children’s Literature Review, Vol. 190. Ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau. Farmington Hills: Gale Cengage Learning, 2014. 50–63.
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Although Arthur Miller’s The Crucible (1953) rose to fame due to its allegorical critique of the anti-Communist hysteria surrounding McCarthyism, this drama is just as important for what it suggests concerning the power of women’s bodies: specifically, that the persecution of witches in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692 was directly linked to the perse...
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The objective of this descriptive study is to examine the relationship between traditional gender roles and academic career at Hacettepe University. The research sample was composed of 283 academics employed at the Sıhhiye and Beytepe campuses, selected through a stratified sampling method. This study determined that women generally take academic l...
Article
Soon after its publication in 1944, Caroline Gordon’s The Women on the Porch—her sixth novel—generated two reviews in The New York Times. The first, by Orville Prescott, noted that the novel’s dust jacket depicted “the figure of a young woman fleeing from the nameless terrors of a dark forest,” and that the “encircling gloom that menaces her . . ....
Chapter
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Teaching Anne and Antonia in Turkey: Feminist Girlhood in L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Willa Cather’s My Antonia.” Anne around the World: L.M. Montgomery and Her Classic. Eds. Jane Ledwell and Jean Mitchell. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s Uni. Press, 2013. 200–215.
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When Wendy Wasserstein (1950–2006) succumbed to her battle with lymphoma on January 30, 2006, the American theatrical community lost not only one of its leading playwrights but also one of its foremost feminist social critics. Wasserstein established her reputation as both through plays such as The Heidi Chronicles (1988), for which she was awarded...
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The embodiment of the environment in women’s bodies (and vice versa) has not only provided feminist poets with the conceptual tools required to bridge the gap between the poet (i.e., the personal) and social awareness (i.e., the political), but has also created a framework for the understanding of female corporeal processes and women’s socio-cultur...
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In the twenty-first century, it is very common to see American babies dressed in miniature versions of adult clothing (suits and bikinis), gendered clothing (pink frilly dresses) and elaborate “special occasion” outfits (like christening gowns and wedding attire) that will only be worn once. However, that was not always the case as Jo B. Paoletti e...
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In her recent work Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960, Rebecca Sharpless provides an intriguing account of the personal and public lives of African American domestic workers from Reconstruction to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement. She traces how cooking and the other household jobs that accompanied...
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Guest Editor, Journal of American Studies of Turkey, Special Issue, “Transnational Feminisms.” Issue 38 (2013). ISSN: 1300-6606.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Sexuality, Insanity and the Old South in Tennessee Williams’s Suddenly Last Summer.” Critical Insights: Southern Gothic Literature. Ed. Jay Ellis. Pasadena: Salem Press, 2013. 153–172.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Recuperating, Re-membering, and Resurrecting the Old South: Historical Adaptation in Caroline Gordon’s Penhally and None Shall Look Back.” The Adaptation of History: Essays on Ways of Telling the Past. Eds. Laurence Raw and Defne Ersin Tutan. Jefferson: McFarland Publishers, 2013. 181–195.
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My interview with Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan, the editors of the influential textbook An Introduction to Women’s Studies: Gender in a Transnational World, which was a major intervention in Women’s Studies pedagogy when it was first published in 2001.
Article
Most readings of American playwright Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour (1934) focus on the psycho-social power of adolescent-driven gossip, rumours and slander, and the frightening outcomes that can emerge when people lose their ability to reason, question, analyse and criticise the world around them. This article argues that the drama also ser...
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Despite the passage of three-quarters of a century since its publication in 1936, critics and biographers still grapple with how to place Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind (GWTW) within southern literature. While some hail GWTW as an example of the 'Great American Novel', others see the work as contributing to the perpetuation of destructive s...
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Introduction to the Special Forum in honor of Sau-ling Wong, entitled "Redefining the American in Asian American Studies: Transnationalism, Diaspora, and Representation," edited by Tanfer Emin Tunc, Elisabetta Marino, and Daniel Y. Kim. https://escholarship.org/uc/acgcc_jtas/4/1
Book
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin and Bahar Gursel, eds. The Transnational Turn in American Studies: Turkey and the United States. Bern: Peter Lang Publishing, 2012. ISBN: 978-3-0343-0552-5
Article
The use of food as American war propaganda finds its origins in the First World War, when anti-German sentiment prompted Americans to rename German foods. The First World War also signifies an important turning point in the history of American food consumption because it represents a shift in eating habits, culinary practices, and domestic food pre...
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin and Zafer Parlak. “Obama-Mania in Turkey: Popular Culture and the Forty-Fourth President of the United States in a Secular Muslim Nation.” The Iconic Obama, 2007–2009: Essays on Media Representations of the Candidate and New President. Eds. Nicholas A. Yanes and Derrais Carter. Jefferson: McFarland Publishers, 2012. 213–230.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “‘How I Tried to Leave the Mall and Why the Mall Wouldn’t Let Me’: Thoughts on American Consumer Culture and the Mallification of Turkey.” The Transnational Turn in American Studies: Turkey and the United States. Eds. Tanfer Emin Tunc and Bahar Gursel. Bern: Peter Lang Publishing, 2012. 225–251.
Chapter
Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Turkey and the Kennedy Mystique: Idealized Icons, National Memory, and the (Re)birth of Camelot.” “Forever Young?” The Changing Images of America. Eds. Philip Coleman and Stephen Matterson. Heidelberg: Universitatsverlag Winter, 2012. 81–91.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “The Model T and the Roaring Twenties: The Automobile, Social Change, and Cultural Critique in American Literature.” Critical Insights: Technology and Humanity. Ed. Carol Colatrella. Pasadena: Salem Press, 2012. 63–78.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Adapting, Translating, and Transforming: Cultural Mediation in Ping Chong’s Deshima and Pojagi.” Translation, Adaptation and Transformation. Ed. Laurence Raw. London: Continuum, 2012. 81–98
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Kake Walk on Kampus: Ritualizing Racism or Commemorating Tradition at the University of Vermont?” We Are What We Remember: The American Past Through Commemoration. Eds. Jeffrey L. Meriwether and Laura Mattoon D’Amore. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012. 47–76.
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Emin, Tanfer. «Chapitre 28. Monstres et phénomènes de foire : les numéros d'attraction de Coney Island et les eugénistes de Long Island (1910-1935)», Pascal Blanchard éd., Zoos humains et exhibitions coloniales. 150 ans d’inventions de l’Autre. La Découverte, 2011, pp. 333-343.
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This essay explores Muriel Magenta's personal and political causes as a transnational academic feminist, as well as the ways in which her public electronic art has served as a forum for the intersection of technology, social critique and women's issues.
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As demonstrated by Deirdre Osborne’s 2011 review essay for Contemporary Women’s Writing ‘‘Feminist Stages and Subaltern Sightlines,’’ theater and drama have proven to be important and challenging areas of exploration and intervention for contemporary feminists. Complementing recent publications on feminist theater are three new studies of individua...
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In her meticulously researched nonfiction investigation The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, journalist Rebecca Skloot exposes the heretofore untold story of Henrietta Lacks, the African American woman behind the most prolific cell line used in science, HeLa (an abbreviation consisting of the first two letters of her first and last names). The cel...
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This qualitative study examines the current status of Web 2.0 technologies in Turkey and focuses specifically on the use of such technologies by academics. The main focus of the chapter involves presenting the results of two surveys (using samples of convenience) conducted on faculty members at Hacettepe University (a public research-oriented insti...
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Tunc, Tanfer. Feminism’s Unfinished Legacy: Critiques of Gender and Racial Inequality in Contemporary American Women’s Literature. Saarbrucken: VDM, 2011.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Tell-Tale Heart,’” and “Langston Hughes’ Poetry.” Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature, Volumes 2 and 3. Ed. Jennifer McClinton-Temple. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 2011. 578–582; 880–883.
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Tunc, Tanfer. Contributor (29 Entries), Routledge Annotated Bibliography of English Studies, Nineteenth Century Section. Ed. Johanna M. Smith.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Jan Nordby Gretlund, Ed., Still in Print: The Southern Novel Today.” Journal of American Studies of Turkey 33/34 (2011): 96–98.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Genetic Engineering and Its Applications.” World History Encyclopedia, Era 9: Promises and Paradoxes, 1945–Present. Eds. Fred Nadis and Jack Waskey. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, Inc., 2011. 736–737.
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Tunc, Tanfer Emin. “Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women,” and “John Stuart Mill’s The Subjection of Women.” Feminist Writings from Ancient Times to the Modern World: A Global Sourcebook and History. Ed. Tiffany K. Wayne. Santa Barbara: Greenwood, 2011. 162–165; 254–257.
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In her eclectic work, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee: Observations on Not Fitting In (2000) Paisley Rekdal (1970– ), an American of Norwegian and Chinese heritage, dissects the relationship between biraciality and sexuality by examining her status as a self-identified hapa and as an objectified/fetishized woman who is forced to adapt to numerous...
Chapter
While Wendy Wasserstein's plays Uncommon Women and Others (1977), Isn’t it Romantic (1983), The Heidi Chronicles (1988) (for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1989), The Sisters Rosensweig (1992), An American Daughter (1997), and Third (2005) have been praised for their biting commentary on the status of women in American societ...
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Although Wasserstein’s An American Daughter (1997) was neither a popular nor critical success at its premier, is only very rarely performed now, and, with the passage of over a decade, has, for some, come to seem a bit dated, it picks up where The Heidi Chronicles left off, providing an enormous amount of insight not only into the playwright’s oeuv...

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Projects (7)
Project
My publications on the history of science, technology, engineering and medicine.
Project
My publications on Asian American and African American literature, culture, and history.
Project
My publications on the literature, culture, and history of the US South.