Tanambelo Rasolondrainy

Tanambelo Rasolondrainy
Pennsylvania State University | Penn State · Department of Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

8
Publications
2,045
Reads
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92
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
88 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Africanist Anthropologist-Archaeologist-Historian. I received my License es lettres (BA) in History from the University of Toliara (Madagascar), my MA in Archaeology from the University of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), and my MPhil and Ph.D. in Anthropology from Yale University (USA). I participated in archaeological research projects conducted in different countries including the Comoros islands, Kenya, Madagascar, Peru, and Tanzania. My research interests include human-environment interactions, settlement patterns, indigenous knowledge, rock art, and regional interactions. My current project is looking at the resilience of communities in the face of climate variability in southwest Madagascar.
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - June 2019
Yale University
Position
  • PhD Candidate
September 2015 - May 2017
Yale University
Position
  • Teaching Fellow
Description
  • Run lab sections for lecture classes; meet with the faculty leading the course once per week; and attend lectures, and grade papers, homework, problem sets and exams
September 2015 - May 2016
Yale University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2013 - May 2019
Yale University
Field of study
  • Anthropology
September 2009 - September 2011
University of Dar es Salaam
Field of study
  • Archaeology
September 2003 - June 2008
Université de Toliara
Field of study
  • Histoire

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Anthropologists coined the term human niche construction theory (HNCT) to apply the ecological concept of niche construction to the study of human society. Most of the work done on HNCT focuses on the biological and economic aspects of human niche construction. This paper aims to integrate HNCT in the archaeological study of settlement choice. I in...
Article
Background Communities in southwest Madagascar have co‐evolved with a hypervariable environment and climate. The paleoclimate record reflects major fluctuations in climatic conditions over the course of Holocene human settlement. Archeological evidence indicates short‐term occupations of sites, suggesting that frequent residential mobility and flex...
Article
Full-text available
Remote sensing technology has become a standard tool for archaeological prospecting. Yet the ethical guidelines associated with the use of these technologies are not well established and are even less-often discussed in published literature. With a nearly unobstructed view of large geographic spaces, aerial and spaceborne remote sensing technology...
Article
The timing of the human settlement of Madagascar, one of the last large landmasses to be settled by people, remains a key topic of debate in archaeology. Despite decades of research, recent estimates for initial settlement are increasingly divergent and span ca. 9000 years: the widest colonization window for any island within the reliable range of...
Article
This paper presents the result of an archaeological study on the first prehistoric rock paintings site discovered in Madagascar and the wider Southwestern Indian Ocean basin. It provides archaeological evidence that contributes to the understanding of the prehistory of Madagascar as well as the distribution of African rock art. Until recently, Mada...
Article
Stylistically unique black rock drawings have been discovered in Andriamamelo Cave in western Madagascar. Several image groupings comprise naturalistic scenes with anthropomorphic, zoomorphic, and therianthropic figures. These complex images are not similar to the polychrome painted symbols previously described from the Isalo region of SW Madagasca...
Conference Paper
This paper presents the result of an archaeological study on the first prehistoric rock paintings site discovered in Madagascar and the wider Southwestern Indian Ocean basin. It provides archaeological evidence that contributes to the understanding of the prehistory of Madagascar as well as the distribution of African rock art. Until recently, Mada...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Due to increasing biodiversity loss, climate change and globalization, oral traditions in the Velondriake area are disappearing. We, therefore, aim to document, preserve, and revitalize oral history within this changing landscape, focusing mainly on social memory and its transmission, mobility and resource use, response to climate change, human resilience, social identity, social organization, social networks, and memories of conflict and warfare. We conducted 120 interviews with 111 oral historians (91 males, 20 females) across 32 villages and hamlets. We transcribed the audio recordings to prepare and package them for digital archiving. Copies of the transcriptions were translated from Vezo to English and packaged for digital archiving to make the information available to non-Vezo speakers. We are preparing academic publications and grant proposals in close collaboration with Vezo community members, to support their efforts to sustain traditional livelihoods in a rapidly changing environment.
Project
I conducted my PhD dissertation research project to establish a narrative of human decision-making in the face of unpredictable climate and intergroup conflicts along the Middle Sakamarekely Valley, in arid southwest Madagascar.