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Tamaya Van Criekinge

Tamaya Van Criekinge
KU Leuven | ku leuven · Department of Rehabilitation Sciences

PhD

About

57
Publications
7,778
Reads
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366
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2015 - September 2020
University of Antwerp
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Position: Teaching and Research Assistant.
July 2014 - January 2015
RevArte Rehabilitation Hospital
Position
  • Physiotherapist
Education
September 2009 - June 2014
KU Leuven
Field of study
  • Rehabilitation Sciences & Physioterhapy - Neurorehabilitation

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Aim: To synthesize existing evidence on the effectiveness of speech-language teleinterventions delivered via videoconferencing to users of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. Method: A systematic literature search was conducted in 10 electronic databases, from inception until August 2021. Included were speech-language telei...
Article
Music therapy (MT) has been used to support people with a variety of eating disorders (EDs), but it is unclear whether there is sufficient and robust evidence from controlled experimental studies. In this article, we report the results of a systematic review that summarises the evidence from published controlled studies where MT has been used to tr...
Article
Background Trunk control improves mobility, balance and quality of life early after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and is therefore considered an important parameter during the recovery process. However, little is known about trunk control, motion and alignment after TKA. Increasing our understanding aids in optimizing treatment strategies to enhanc...
Article
Objectives: To assess the immediate and three days postintervention effect of one dry needling session compared to one sham needling session on pain, central pain processing, muscle co-contraction and spatiotemporal parameters during gait in knee osteoarthritis patients. Methods: A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty-on...
Article
Background Despite strong evidence that walking speed and forward propulsion decline with increasing age, their relationship is still poorly understood. While changes in the ankle and hip mechanics have been described, few studies have reported the effect of ageing on the whole leg’s contribution to propulsion. Research question The aim of this st...
Article
Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of chronic disability in the elderly 1,2 . Abnormal central pain processing (CPP) is present in around 30% of the knee OA patients ³ and can be partly induced by peripheral nociception through long term potentiation ⁴ . An attempt to resolve abnormal CPP can be to eliminate this nociception ⁵ . My...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is a strong consensus that music listening is a common and effective means to induce states of relaxation, little attention has been given to the physical effects of such states and the potential health-related applications. In this article, we investigated whether music listening could induce affective states of relaxation and accel...
Article
Full-text available
Walking is an activity you do every day without even thinking about it. But have you ever wondered how we walk or why some people walk a bit strangely? We all limp when we hit a toe against the table or when we sprain a foot. But some people seem to walk even more strangely. Having difficulties with walking is not always the result of weak legs or...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Constraint induced movement therapy (CIMT) is effective at improving upper limb outcomes after stroke. Aim: The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of lower limb CIMT studies of any design in people with stroke. Materials/ Method: PubMED, PEDro, OTSeeker, CENTRAL, and Web of Science we...
Article
Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is used for the rehabilitation of motor function after stroke. The aim of this review was to investigate its effect on persons-reported outcomes of health status (PROsHS) compared with conventional therapy. The study was a systematic review and meta-analysis registered in PROSPERO (CRD42019142279). Five da...
Article
Background Although previous narrative reviews have highlighted a potential association between visuospatial neglect (VSN) and balance disorders, to what extent different areas of balance and mobility could be affected is still unclear. Objectives This systematic review updates previous literature findings and systematically reviews sitting balanc...
Article
Background: Trunk training after stroke is an effective method for improving trunk control, standing balance and mobility. The SWEAT² study attempts to discover the underlying mechanisms leading to the observed mobility carry-over effects after trunk training. Aim: A secondary analysis investigating the effect of trunk training on muscle activat...
Poster
Full-text available
Although previous narrative reviews have already highlighted a potential association between visuospatial neglect and balance disorders, it is still unclear to what extent different areas of balance and mobility could be affected. Therefore, this first-ever systematic review updates previous literature and systematically investigates sitting balanc...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to assess the interrater and test-retest reliability and the concurrent validity of the modified timed up and go test for preschoolers. As such, we aim to determine the most suited outcome of the modified timed up and go test: the best or the average performance. Thirty-two children (age 3–5) performed three timed up a...
Thesis
Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and abruptly alters the quality of life of survivors. Approximately 80 percent of all stroke survivors show mobility deficits after two weeks of the diagnosis, while 60 percent of patients require assistance for their activities of daily living. Moreover, two to four years post-stroke, pat...
Article
Objective: Trunk training after stroke is an effective method for improving mobility, yet underlying associations leading to the observed mobility carryover effects are unknown. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of trunk training for gait and trunk kinematics and to find explanatory variables for the mobility carryov...
Article
Age-related changes in the way of walking may induce changes in dynamic stability. Therefore, the relationship between age, spatio-temporal characteristics and margins of stability was examined. One hundred and five healthy adults aged between 20 and 89 years old were analysed on spatio-temporal characteristics and margins of stability using three-...
Article
Background Trunk function and lower limb strength seem to be the primary predictors for functional independence in acute stroke patients. Gaining a better understanding of their relationship during walking aids in the identification of intrinsic trunk control deficits and underlying lower limb deficits resulting in compensatory trunk movements. Me...
Article
Full-text available
Background As music listening is able to induce self-perceived and physiological signs of relaxation, it might be an interesting tool to induce muscle relaxation in patients with hypertonia. To this date effective non-pharmacological rehabilitation strategies to treat hypertonia in neurologically impaired patients are lacking. Therefore the aim is...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To investigate the effects of sound-based interventions (SBIs) on biomechanical parameters in stroke patients. Methods: PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and the Cochrane Library were searched until September 2019. Studies examining the effect of SBIs on kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic...
Poster
Full-text available
Immersive virtual reality (VR) might offer advantages for rehabilitation by answering to key requirements of motor learning, such as task specificity and variation. However, its usefulness for rehabilitation depends on its ability to elicit behavior that is comparable to that in real life. Before the clinical usage of VR can be encouraged, a thorou...
Conference Paper
Immersive virtual reality (IVR) might offer advantages for rehabilitation by answering to key requirements of motor learning, such as task-specificity, variability, feedback and repetition. However, its usefulness for rehabilitation depends on its ability to elicit behaviour that is comparable to that in real life. Before the clinical use of IVR ca...
Conference Paper
In healthy adults, four different muscle synergies have been described compared to three after stroke, as a result of merging of synergies. The presence of merged synergies was related to impaired motor function which makes muscle synergies a powerful tool for assessing neurological deficits. However, motor function after stroke is subject to a gre...
Poster
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE: The Timed up and go test (TUG) is a very straightforward functional test to assess a child’s functional balance control during walking and is therefore frequently used in clinical practice. Nevertheless, to enhance its administration in preschool children, we developed a modified protocol. The aim of this study is therefor...
Poster
Full-text available
A better understanding of the coordinated activation patterns of the lower limbs, also known as muscle synergies, might help us improve assessment, goal setting and treatment plans. Therefore, it is necessary to gain insight in the number of muscle synergies and the distribution of muscle weightings that are present during walking after stroke
Article
Purpose: The aim of this systematic review was to determine the number of muscle synergies and the distribution of muscle weightings in stroke patients during gait. Material and Methods: This review is registered on PROSPERO (number: CRD42018088701) and is written following the PRISMA guidelines. A systematic search was conducted using following da...
Article
Objective:: To investigate the effectiveness of trunk training on trunk control, sitting and standing balance and mobility. Data sources:: PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Cochrane Library, Rehab+ and ScienceDirect were searched until January 2019. Review methods:: Randomized controlled trials were inclu...
Chapter
Trunk control is considered an important predictor for functional outcome after stroke. Therefore incorporating exercises to increase trunk control is of great importance during stroke rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of trunk training on trunk control, standing balance and gait. Results showed that trunk train...
Chapter
In the majority of stroke patients, trunk function is impaired and characterized by diminished sitting balance, trunk coordination and muscle strength. However, there is no true consensus how these impairments are translated during walking after sub-acute stroke. Results showed that the hemiplegic gait pattern was characterized with increased thora...
Article
Purpose: Since the thorax and pelvis are primary determinants of normal and pathological walking, it is important to know how gait performance is influenced when the trunk is constraint. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of a thoracolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO) on gait performance in healthy adults during overground walking....
Article
Full-text available
Background: Pre-clinical evidence suggests a period early after stroke during which the brain is most receptive to rehabilitation, if it is provided as high-dose motor training. Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of repetitive gait training within the first 3 months post-stroke and the effects on gait-specific outcomes. Methods: PubMed, Web...
Poster
Full-text available
Animal models suggest a sensitive period early post-stroke, in which rehabilitation is most effective. In human stroke care, the early rehabilitation phase is described as a time of physical inactivity and therapy is provided low-dosed, which might explain disappointing mobility outcome. The hypothesis that an early increase of rehabilitation inten...
Article
Purpose: A motivational surrounding is desirable in stroke rehabilitation considering the need to train repetitively to improve balance, even after discharge from rehabilitation facilities. This review aims to investigate whether it is feasible to combine virtual reality (VR) which allows exercising in game-like environments with tele-rehabilitatio...
Poster
Full-text available
Purpose Trunk exercises can improve trunk performance, standing balance and gait after stroke. However, little is known about the effects on upper limb function. Since we use our arms during walking to optimize stability, decrease energetic cost and facilitate movement of the legs, interventions aiming to improve arm swing are crucial. Methods I...
Article
Background: This study aimed to report normative reference data for a Dynamic Visual Acuity test while walking on treadmill. The protocol’s suitability was assessed by investigating its test-retest reliability and its validity through the drop-out rate and verification of the frequency of head movements. Furthermore, the influence of age on visual...
Article
Background: When toddlers learn to walk, they do so with a typical high guard position of the arms. As gait matures, children develop a reciprocal arm swing. So far, there have been no attempts to describe age-related changes of arm movements during walking after this first rapid development. Research question: The purpose of this study was to i...
Article
Objective: To examine how muscle activity over the entire gait cycle changes with increasing age. Methods: Electromyography data of the erector spinae, rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles were collected by an instrumented gait analysis during over ground walking in healthy adults aged bet...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction Animal models suggest a limited time window of heightened plasticity poststroke (1), in which the brain is most receptive to motor training (2). In human stroke care, this early phase is described as a time of being inactive and alone (3), which might explain disappointing rehabilitation outcome. Already described therapeutic strategi...
Article
Objective: A systematic review to examine the effect of static or dynamic trunk training compared to standard care or control therapy on muscle activity and muscle thickness of the trunk and lower limb muscles in stroke survivors. Materials and methods: This review was registered on PROSPERO (no: CRD42017063771) and was written according to the PRI...
Article
Purpose It is hypothesized that peripheral somatosensory stimulation (PSS) can promote postural recovery after stroke by increasing afferent input and postural contribution of the paretic leg. Therefore, this systematic review aims to investigate which PSS approaches are documented and investigated on effectiveness. Methods Five databases (PubMed,...
Article
Introduction: Covariance among spatio-temporal parameters of gait (STP) is high, suggesting redundancy (1). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) can be used to extract relevant gait domains from the high-dimensional dataset of STP (1-3). It has been suggested that these domains reflect motor, cognitive or behavioural constraints (1). To evaluate this...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Evidence is lacking concerning the effect of additional trunk rehabilitation on gait performance. Investigating gait performance by both clinical and biomechanical outcome measures might lead to new scientific insights into the importance of the trunk during gait rehabilitation in people suffering from stroke. This protocol was written...
Article
Objective: To investigate the effect of trunk rehabilitation using unstable support surfaces compared to stable support surfaces, on static and dynamic balance after stroke. Materials and methods: A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant articles from the following databases: Medline (PubMed), Web of Science, PEDro, REHAB+, Rehabda...
Article
Stroke commonly results in trunk impairments that are associated with decreased trunk coordination and limited trunk muscle strength. These impairments often result in biomechanical changes during walking. Additionally, the so-called pelvic step might be influenced by these impairments. Therefore, the aim of this review was twofold. First, to gain...
Poster
Do continuous waveforms of gait kinematics in normal walking change by aging in healthy individuals?

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Pre-clinical research has pointed towards a time window of enhanced responsiveness to rehabilitation early after a stroke. For example, reaching training has led to substantial recovery if initiated 5 or 14, but not 30 days post-stroke in a rodent model (Biernaski 2004). It is suggested that this early period is characterized by heightened levels of neuroplasticity and that training can exploit this leading to improved outcome. The typically observed non-linear recovery pattern in stroke survivors, where most recovery occurs early (Kwakkel 2004) might suggest that similar mechanisms are induced in the human brain. However, clinical research on this is disappointingly sparse. In two closely inter-related phases, we aim to examine the biomechanical changes related to standing balance and walking recovery during the first 3 to 6 months post-stroke (Phase I) and the specific effects of early gait-specific training (Phase II). By that, we aim to detect a time window in stroke survivors which resembles the same characteristics as observed in animal models. To initiate training at an early stage, when patients usually present severe weakness and instability, a mobile exoskeleton is used. The gained knowledge may contribute to changes in stroke rehabilitation structure and practice. To date stroke patients spend most of their time in rehabilitation facilities physically inactive and alone. Evidence on a critical time window will encourage a substantial shift towards a rehabilitation approach where patients are maximally stimulated to recover through early intensive therapy. _____________________________________________ Phase I: Exploring what stroke survivors exactly learn when recovering the ability to maintain standing balance and walk. (I.a) Is there a distinct time window of behavioral restitution (i.e., a return towards pre-stroke movement patterns) underlying early walking recovery? (I.b) Are improvements in standing and walking throughout the first 6 months post-stroke explained by behavioral restitution or learning to use compensation strategies? Phase II: Investigating the effects of additional robot-assisted gait training initiated either early (2 weeks post-stroke) or delayed (8 weeks post-stroke) after stroke onset. (II.a) Are stroke survivors who train gait with the assistance of a robot at an early stage more likely to achieve independent walking? (II.b) Does additional robot-assisted gait training modulate the recovery of standing and walking ability by enhancing behavioral restitution?
Project
In-depth biomechanical gait analyses have contributed to the understanding of gait patterns as they can reveal the impairments underlying an abnormal movement pattern. At first, we aim to gain a better understanding concerning the biomechanical interaction between trunk and gait performance in both healthy and stroke subjects. Secondly, despite of the evidence demonstrating the importance of trunk performance after stroke, studies about the effects of trunk exercises are inconsistent. The use of clinical outcome measures used in literature cannot explain the underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic effects which we will aim to unravel.