Tamara Emmenegger

Tamara Emmenegger
Lund University | LU · Department of Biology

PhD
PostDoc fellow at Lund university

About

49
Publications
17,289
Reads
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618
Citations
Citations since 2017
31 Research Items
566 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
"So, naturalists observe, a flea has smaller fleas that on him prey; and these have smaller still to bite ’em; and so proceed ad infinitum." - Jonathan Swift
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - December 2020
Swiss Ornithological Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2013 - December 2018
Swiss Ornithological Institute
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2012 - April 2013
Swiss Ornithological Institute
Position
  • Scientific intern
Education
June 2016 - December 2018
ETH Zurich
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2010 - February 2013
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
September 2007 - July 2010
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Background Migratory birds differ markedly in their migration strategies, particularly those performing short- versus long-distance migrations. In preparation for migration, all birds undergo physiological and morphological modifications including enlargement of fat stores and pectoral muscles to fuel and power their flights, as well as cardiovascu...
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance migrants are under strong selection to arrive on their breeding grounds at a time that maximizes fitness. Many arctic birds start nesting shortly after snow recedes from their breeding sites and timing of snowmelt can vary substantially over the breeding range of widespread species. We tested the hypothesis that migration schedules of...
Article
Full-text available
Background Populations of long-distance migratory birds experience different environments and are consequently exposed to different parasites throughout their annual cycles. Though, specific whereabouts and accompanied host-parasite interactions remain unknown for most migratory passerines. Collared sand martins (Riparia riparia) breeding in the we...
Article
Full-text available
Annual cycle events may be interlinked, influence following annual cycle stages, and may alter performance of individuals. Such links, called carry-over effects, can explain individual variation in timing or reproductive success in migratory species. Identifying the key links affecting fitness may reveal the mechanisms of species population dynamic...
Article
Full-text available
How blood parasite infections influence the migration of hosts remains a lively debated issue as past studies found negative, positive, or no response to infections. This particularly applies to small birds, for which monitoring of detailed migration behavior over a whole annual cycle has been technically unachievable so far. Here, we investigate h...
Article
Full-text available
Data from remote sensing are often used as proxies to quantify biological processes, especially at large geographical scales. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is the most frequently used proxy for primary productivity. Assuming a direct, positive interrelation between primary and secondary production in terrestrial habitats, NDVI i...
Article
Full-text available
Amongst other factors, host behaviour critically determines the patterns with which blood parasites occur in wild host populations. In particular, migratory hosts that sequentially occupy distant sites within and across years are expected to show distinct patterns of blood parasitism depending on their population-specific schedules and whereabouts....
Article
Capsule: A combination of several biometric measures enables the reliable sexing of the European Bee-eater Merops apiaster, a species with subtle sex differences in plumage and morphometry. Aims: To explore variation in biometrics and their suitability to discriminate sex in adult European Bee-eaters Merops apiaster. Methods: We sampled populations...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Knowledge of broad-scale biogeographical patterns of animal migration is important for understanding ecological drivers of migratory behaviours. Here, we present a flyway-scale assessment of the spatial structure and seasonal dynamics of the Afro-Palaearctic bird migration system and explore how phenology of the environment guides long-distanc...
Article
Full-text available
Currently, the deployment of tracking devices is one of the most frequently used approaches to study movement ecology of birds. Recent miniaturisation of light‐level geolocators enabled studying small bird species whose migratory patterns were widely unknown. However, geolocators may reduce vital rates in tagged birds and may bias obtained movement...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that the nutrient and energy requirements of birds increase substantially during moult, but it is not known if these increased demands affect their aerobic capacity. We quantified the absolute aerobic scope of house and Spanish sparrows, Passer domesticus and P. hispaniolensis, respectively, before and during sequential stage...
Article
Across their ranges, different populations of migratory species often use separate routes to migrate between breeding and non‐breeding grounds. Recent changes in climate and land‐use have led to breeding range expansions in many species, but it is unclear whether these populations also establish new migratory routes, non‐breeding sites and migratio...
Article
Full-text available
In many taxa, the most common form of sex-biased migration timing is protandry-the earlier arrival of males at breeding areas. Here we test this concept across the annual cycle of long-distance migratory birds. Using more than 350 migration tracks of small-bodied trans-Saharan migrants, we quantify differences in male and female migration schedules...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile hosts like birds occupy a wide array of habitats in which they encounter various vector and parasite faunas. If the infection probability for vector-borne parasites varies among seasons and biomes, a migratory life can critically influence the infections of a host. The growing body of literature on avian blood parasites suggests that host mi...
Article
Full-text available
Background Over the past decade, the miniaturisation of animal borne tags such as geolocators and GPS-transmitters has revolutionized our knowledge of the whereabouts of migratory species. Novel light-weight multi-sensor loggers (1.4 g), which harbour sensors for measuring ambient light intensity, atmospheric pressure, temperature and acceleration,...
Article
Full-text available
On the Balkan Peninsula, migratory Spanish Sparrows breed sympatrically with resident House Sparrows. While the two species share many biological and ecological traits, migratory patterns and adaptions to migratory lifestyle of the Spanish Sparrow are unknown. We tracked a Spanish Sparrow across its 1800 km long migration from Bulgaria to the nonbr...
Article
Thousands of species migrate [1]. Though we have some understanding of where and when they travel, we still have very little insight into who migrates with whom and for how long. Group formation is pivotal in allowing individuals to interact, transfer information, and adapt to changing conditions [2]. Yet it is remarkably difficult to infer group m...
Article
Whether long‐distance animal migration facilitates or hampers pathogen transmission depends on how infections affect the routes and timing of migrating hosts. If an infection directly or indirectly impedes migratory flight capacity, infected individuals lag behind their uninfected conspecifics. Although such temporal segregation can limit parasite...
Article
Full-text available
Blood parasites (Haemosporidia) are thought to impair the flight performance of infected animals, and therefore, infected birds are expected to differ from their non-infected counterparts in migratory capacity. Since haemosporidians invade host erythrocytes, it is commonly assumed that infected individuals will have compromised aerobic capacity, bu...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory birds often move significantly within their nonbreeding range before returning to breed. It remains unresolved under which circumstances individuals relocate, whether movement patterns are consistent between populations and to which degree the individuals benefit from the intratropical movement (ITM). We tracked adult great reed warblers...
Data
Nonbreeding sites of the tracked great reed warblers with the quartiles in longitude and latitude
Poster
Full-text available
Many species of migratory birds are currently suffering global declines and setting up effective conservation measures requires an understanding of their migratory connectivity. When migratory connectivity is low, individual from a particular breeding population spread over a shared area during the non-breeding season, mixing with individuals from...
Poster
Full-text available
Studying parasitism in migrating animals is difficult, as breeding grounds – the only location where such studies can take place – are only inhabited for few weeks or months. Thus, already the choice of a suitable study species proves to be a difficult task. Despite these difficulties, migrant hosts are interesting to study: They are assumed to be...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term shifts in vegetation phenology generally follow the pattern of global warming. Yet, topographical complexity and biome diversity cause uneven spatial trends in the phenological response of vegetation to climate change. If phenology changes similarly along migration routes, individuals may adequately respond by shifting the whole migration...
Article
Full-text available
Over decades it has been unclear how individual migratory songbirds cross large ecological barriers such as seas or deserts. By deploying light-level geolocators on four songbird species weighing only about 12 g, we found that these otherwise mainly nocturnal migrants seem to regularly extend their nocturnal flights into the day when crossing the S...
Article
Full-text available
In migratory birds, morphological adaptations for efficient migratory flight often oppose morphological adaptations for efficient behavior during resident periods. This includes adaptations in wing shape for either flying long distances or foraging in the vegetation and in climate-driven variation of body size. In addition, the timing of migratory...
Data
Table S1. Morphometry of nightingales (Luscinia m. megarynchos) across its distribution range. Figure S1. Longitudinal pattern of migration distance and four environmental factors at specific breeding sites of local populations used in the study.
Article
AimThe extent to which individuals from different breeding populations mix throughout the non-breeding season (i.e. migratory connectivity') has important consequences for population dynamics and conservation. Given recent declines of long-distance migrant birds, multipopulation tracking studies are crucial in order to assess the strength of migrat...
Article
Full-text available
Migration detours, the spatial deviation from the shortest route, are a widespread phenomenon in migratory species, especially if barriers must be crossed. Moving longer distances causes additional efforts in energy and time, and to be adaptive, this should be counterbalanced by favorable condition en route. We compared migration patterns of nighti...
Article
Full-text available
The timing of migration substantially influences individual fitness. To match peak requirements with peak resource availability, we hypothesized that individual migrants schedule spring migration in close relation to seasonal changes in environmental conditions along the route and particularly, at the breeding destination.To test this hypothesis, w...
Article
Full-text available
Individual migrants often fly detours when travelling between breeding and non-breeding sites, resulting in specific changes in flight directions along a migratory leg. Western European populations of the European Roller (Coracias garrulus), the only member of the roller family of birds to breed in Europe, differ substantially in their predicted fl...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Ahoj everyone, I would be interested in a very simple application where somebody (both researchers, when working and the public, when waiting on a train or sitting on a public bench) could enter 3-4 ring colors of a color-ring marked bird plus either choose a location on a Google map or let the device save the GPS position together with the time stamp and the color code. So the app should just take these data and put it in a database. Any other functionalities like allowing the observer to add a behavioural category or similar would be nice but totally optional. Thanks for any hint whether this is existing somewhere or showing interest if you think the development of such a tool is in your field and scope of activity.
Question
The fresh blood is inserted into the device in a single-use cuvette in which hemoglobin is transformed to azidemethemoglobin in a chemical reaction. Since this product is measured spectrophotometrically by Hemocue, I am almost sure that the measurement method is too specific to be influenced by a crystalized substance like hemozoin, eventhough this has the same origin, as it is the metabolitic product of hemoglobin produced by malaria parasites.
The company which produces Hemocue - or at least their customer service -was not able to answer this question. But since this is very important in our research about the influences of avian malaria parasites on the physiology and performance of migratory birds I would like to get a confirmation by a veterinarian, medical doctor or chemisist with more expertise in this topic. Thank you in advance!

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
We aim at closing gaps in our current knowledge about the consequences of parasites on their migrating avian hosts on specific time-scales, like at the scale of minutes to days (physiological performance), at the scale of days to weeks (daily activity budgets), at the scale of weeks to months (migration behaviour), and finally, at the scale of years to life-time (survival and reproductive success).