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Tali Erickson-Gini

Tali Erickson-Gini
Israel Antiquities Authority · Research

About

30
Publications
5,457
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227
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
189 Citations
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Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
In Roman to late Byzantine times, Elusa (Hebrew: Haluza, Arabic: al-Khalasa) was the most important settlement in the Negev region and its only proper city. Identified in 1838 by E. Robinson, it was subsequently visited by numerous researchers. The most important investigations took place in the form of surveys and excavations from the 1970s until...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global agro-biodiversity has resulted from processes of plant migration and agricultural adoption. Although critically affecting current diversity, crop diffusion from antiquity to the middle-ages is poorly researched, overshadowed by studies on that of prehistoric periods. A new archaeobotanical dataset from three Negev Highland desert sites demon...
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance trade routes criss-crossed ancient Africa and Eurasia. Archaeological research has focused on the commodities in transit and the excavation of major centres located along these routes, with less attention paid to smaller caravanserai and evidence such as rubbish middens. The ‘Incense Route’ linked the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea to...
Presentation
Full-text available
Through investigation into a writing tablet made from a camel's shoulder bone found on the shipwreck Ma'agan Mikhael B, we explore how mariners kept accounts while conducting maritime trade, and postulate potential ethnic and cultural associations of the mariners onboard.
Article
ABSTRACT This is a report of an architectural survey of the “Mufti's House” in Motza/Qālūnyā, Israel. The data is primarily drawn from Saidel and Erickson-Gini's 2019 survey; some information is also drawn from Mashiah's fieldwork in 2010. Historical images demonstrate that this compound was standing by 1906 and that it remained in use throughout t...
Article
This article reports on the 2012 and 2016 field seasons at the Nabataean-Roman hilltop town of Avdat in the central Negev highlands of Israel. The fieldwork, being carried out as part of the Avdat in Late Antiquity Project, is concerned with a multi-roomed cave and stone-built compound along the southern slope of the town, which appears to have bee...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Historians have long debated the role of climate in the rise and fall of empires of the 1st millennium CE. Drastic territorial contraction of the Byzantine Empire, societal decline, and beginning of the European Middle Ages have generally been linked to the Islamic conquests of the seventh century. This multidisciplinary archaeological...
Article
The study presents preliminary results of the renewed excavations at Shivta in the Negev Highlands, Israel. Several trenches were excavated in public buildings, domestic structures, open areas and middens. The goal of the excavations was to fine-tune the history of the site and document changes versus continuity in the Byzantine/Early Islamic trans...
Article
Full-text available
In three field seasons, between 2010 and 2012, the Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP) conducted a diachronic archaeological survey of the northern hinterland of Petra, Jordan. While regional reconnaissance has a long history in Jordan, it has rarely been conducted with the "intensive" methodologies today characteristic of project...
Article
Nine areas were excavated (Areas A-H, N). In the Byzantine period (fifth-early seventh centuries CE), the western perimeter of the site served as an industrial quarter containing a large winepress of the 'four-square' type, a building for storing jars and at least one structure with an underground cellar. A meager occupation occurred during the Ear...
Article
The legacy of one ancient Arabian people, the Nabataeans, is rich in material remains: the rock-carved monuments of Petra, their delicately crafted pottery vessels, and huge desert cisterns and aqueducts, to name only a few. Unlike their neighbors to the north in ancient Judea, the Nabataeans did not leave a written history of themselves, and what...
Article
The preliminary results of excavations conducted at Nahal Be'erotayim West, an abandoned Bedouin campground in the Negev desert, Israel, indicate that multiple tents were pitched in this location in different periods and at different times of the year. The recovered artefacts and architecture provide a means to identify gender and seasonality in th...
Article
The MB II pit graves excavated at the site are unrelated to the Intermediate Bronze Age settlement located to the north. Apparently, only a portion of the cemetery was excavated, which probably extends further beyond the limits of the excavation. The inhabitants buried here may have lived in a satellite settlement of the MB II fortified city at Tel...
Article
Excavations conducted along the Nabataean Incense Road, which extends from Petra to Gaza, highlight the changes and development of this historic trade route over time. Long-distance trade reached its apex following the Roman annexation of Nabataea in 106 CE, followed by a marked decline during the third century CE. Seven of these key sites were con...
Article
A number of research projects in Petra and the surrounding region have resulted in exciting new avenues of study with regard to Nabataean religion, architecture, and economy. Reports concerning eight such projects were presented at the 46th Seminar for Arabian Studies held at the British Museum on 28–30 July 2011. The resulting published volume con...
Article
For many decades, the agricultural installations present throughout the hyper-arid Negev Highlands in southern Israel have been attributed to the ancient Nabataeans. In this article, the origin of this theory will be examined together with past and current research concerning the development of agriculture among the Nabataeans. The earliest form of...
Article
Full-text available
Damage observed in ancient ruins may be caused by several processes, e. g. as the result of poor building technology, weathering with time (static damage), war, or as the result of earthquakes. Damage features resulting from earthquakes were studied in the ancient Nabataean forts of Ein Erga and Ein Rahel in the Central Arava Valley, Israel. Prefer...
Article
Damage observed in ancient ruins may be caused by several processes, e.g. as the result of poor building technology, weathering with time (static damage), war, or as the result of earthquakes. Damage features resulting from earthquakes were studied in the ancient Nabataean forts of Ein Erga and Ein Rahel in the Central Arava Valley, Israel. Prefere...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Brown University Petra Archaeological Project (BUPAP) is a multi-disciplinary regional survey, focused on the northern hinterland of Petra, Jordan. Fieldwork was carried out from 2010 to 2013, in order to understand the development of Petra and its surrounding landscapes diachronically, throughout the region, and at multiple individual sites.