Tali Bitan

Tali Bitan
University of Haifa | haifa · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

71
Publications
10,428
Reads
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2,445
Citations
Introduction
Research Areas • Brain plasticity in training, development and rehabilitation of language skills • FMRI examination of neural mechanisms involved in language learning • Reading acquisition and second language learning in adults and children • Effective connectivity within and between hemispheres • Effects of sleep on language learning
Additional affiliations
October 2006 - January 2015
University of Haifa
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2003 - August 2006
Northwestern University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
April 1998 - October 2003
Weizmann Institute of Science
Field of study
  • Brain Research

Publications

Publications (71)
Article
Implicit learning allows us to acquire complex motor skills through repeated exposure to sensory cues and repetition of motor behaviours, without awareness or effort. Implicit learning is also critical to the incremental fine-tuning of the perceptual-motor system. To understand how implicit learning and associated domain-general learning processes...
Article
The importance of morphological segmentation for reading has been shown in numerous behavioral studies in children and adults. However, little is known about developmental changes in the neural basis of morphological processing. In addition to effects of age and reading skill, morphological processing during reading may be affected by the morpholog...
Article
Full-text available
The current study explores the effects of time and sleep on the consolidation of a novel language learning task containing both item-specific knowledge and the extraction of grammatical regularities. We also compare consolidation effects in language and motor sequence learning tasks, to ask whether consolidation mechanisms are domain general. Young...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in brain connectivity during language therapy were examined among participants with aphasia (PWA), aiming to shed light on neural reorganization in the language network. Four PWA with anomia following left hemisphere stroke and eight healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. Two fMRI scans were administered to all participants with a...
Article
Treatments for anomia have demonstrated short- and long-term efficacy. However, individual outcomes can be variable, and evidence for treatment generalization is limited. We investigated whether treatment techniques which stimulate access to- and learning of language, namely, a) responsiveness to cues, and b) during-treatment improvements in naming...
Article
The current study examined the widely held, but un-tested, assumption that morphological decomposition can compensate for missing phonological information in reading opaque orthographies. In addition, we tested whether morphological decomposition can compensate for the phonological decoding deficits in readers with dyslexia. Hebrew provides a uniqu...
Article
Full-text available
Here we describe the public neuroimaging and behavioral dataset entitled "Cross-Sectional Multidomain Lexical Processing" available on the OpenNeuro project (https://openneuro.org). This dataset explores the neural mechanisms and development of lexical processing through task based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of rhyming, spelling,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Morphology plays an important role in learning and using a language. This study explores the role of language similarity in learning derivational morphological regularities in an artificial second language. Consistent with the Complementary Learning System model, it was hypothesized that native English speaking participants would demonstrate faster...
Article
Full-text available
Language learning occurs in distinct phases. Whereas some improvement is evident during training, offline memory consolidation processes that take place after the end of training play an important role in learning of linguistic information. The timing of offline consolidation is thought to depend on the type of task, with generalization of implicit...
Article
Executive control (EC) ability is increasingly emerging as an important predictor of post-stroke aphasia recovery. This study examined whether EC predicted immediate treatment gains, treatment maintenance and generalization after naming therapy in ten adults with mild to severe chronic post-stroke aphasia. Performance on multiple EC tasks allowed f...
Article
Right-hemisphere involvement in language processing following left-hemisphere damage may reflect either compensatory processes, or a release from homotopic transcallosal inhibition, resulting in excessive right-to-left suppression that is maladaptive for language performance. Using fMRI, we assessed inter-hemispheric effective connectivity in fifte...
Article
Full-text available
Inflectional morphology has been intensively studied as a model of language productivity. However, little is known about how properties of the input affect the emergence of productive affixation. We examined effects of three factors on the learning and generalisation of plural suffixation by adults in an artificial language: affix type frequency (t...
Data
Accuracy of production of treated and untreated words as a function of treatment condition.
Article
Full-text available
Despite the growing evidence regarding the importance of intensity and dose in aphasia therapy, few well-controlled studies contrasting the effects of intensive and non-intensive treatment have been conducted to date. Phonological components analysis (PCA) treatment for anomia has been associated with improvements in some patients with chronic apha...
Article
Full-text available
Melody-based treatments for patients with aphasia rely on the notion of preserved musical abilities in the RH, following left hemisphere damage. However, despite evidence for their effectiveness, the role of the RH is still an open question. We measured changes in resting-state functional connectivity following melody-based intervention, to identif...
Data
Tables 4 and 5 in the supplementary material show changes in resting-state connectivity in the treated and control patients separately for the treatment and baseline periods. These were used to compute the differences in Figure 2. Table 4: changes in resting-state connectivity in the treated patient (JV) during the treatment and baseline periods. V...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological processing of derived words develops simultaneously with reading acquisition. However, the reader’s engagement in morphological segmentation may depend on the language morphological richness and orthographic transparency, and the readers’ reading skills. The current study tested the common idea that morphological segmentation is enhan...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The benefit of stimulus variability for generalization of acquired skills and knowledge has been shown in motor, perceptual, and language learning but has rarely been studied in reading. We studied the effect of variable training in a novel language on reading trained and untrained words. Method: Sixty typical adults received 2 sessions...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The current fMRI study examined the role of phonology in the extraction of meaning from print in each hemisphere by comparing homophonic and heterophonic homographs (ambiguous words in which both meanings have the same or different sounds respectively, e.g., bank or tear). The analysis distinguished between the first phase, in which pa...
Article
Affixal inflectional morphology has been intensively examined as a model of productive aspects of language. Nevertheless, little is known about the neurocognition of the learning and generalization of affixal inflection, or the influence of certain factors that may affect these processes. In an event-related fMRI study, we examined the neurocogniti...
Article
The current study examined the effects of orthographic transparency and familiarity on brain mechanisms involved in word recognition in adult dyslexic Hebrew readers. We compared fMRI brain activation in 21 dyslexic readers and 22 typical readers, and examined the effects of diacritic marks that provide transparent but less familiar information and...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction : Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training conte...
Article
Full-text available
The current study examined the effects of transparency and familiarity on word recognition in adult Hebrew dyslexic readers with a phonological processing deficit as compared to typical readers. We measured oral reading response time and accuracy of single nouns in several conditions: diacritics that provide transparent but less familiar informatio...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This experiment was designed to see if information related to linguistic characteristics of read text can be deduced from fMRI data via machine learning techniques. Individuals were scanned while reading text the size of words in loud reading. Three experiments were performed corresponding to different degrees of grammatical complexity that is perf...
Article
Improvement in performance after the end of the training session, termed "Offline improvement," has been shown in procedural learning tasks. We examined whether Offline improvement in learning a novel orthography depends on the type of reading instruction. Forty-eight adults received multisession training in reading nonsense words, written in an ar...
Article
A remarkable act of memory entails binding different forms of information. We focus on the timeless question of how the bound engram is accessed such that its component features-item and context-are extracted. To shed light on this question, we investigate the dynamics between brain structures that together mediate the binding and extraction of ite...
Article
Full-text available
Previous literature suggests that those with reading disability (RD) have more pronounced deficits during semantic processing in reading as compared to listening comprehension. This discrepancy has been supported by recent neuroimaging studies showing abnormal activity in RD during semantic processing in the visual but not in the auditory modality....
Article
We explored the neural basis of spoken language deficits in children with reading difficulty, specifically focusing on the role of orthography during spoken language processing. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine differences in brain activation between children with reading difficulties (aged 9-to-15 years) and age-matc...
Article
Full-text available
Our aim was to determine the direction of interhemispheric communication in a phonological task in regions involved in different levels of processing. Effective connectivity analysis was conducted on functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 39 children (ages 9-15 years) performing rhyming judgment on spoken words. The results show interactio...
Article
Priming effects were examined in 40 children (9-15 years old) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An orthographic judgment task required participants to determine if two sequentially presented spoken words had the same spelling for the rime. Four lexical conditions were designed: similar orthography and phonology (O(+)P(+)), similar...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Previous literature suggests that those with reading disability (RD) have more pronounced deficits during semantic processing in reading as compared to listening comprehension. This discrepancy has been supported by recent neuroimaging studies showing abnormal activity in RD during semantic processing in the visual but not in the audito...
Article
Full-text available
Our aim was to determine the direction of interhemispheric communication in a phonological task in regions involved in different levels of processing. Effective connectivity analysis was conducted on functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 39 children (ages 9 –15 years) performing rhyming judgment on spoken words. The results show interacti...
Article
Full-text available
We examined age-related changes in the interactions among brain regions in children performing rhyming judgments on visually presented words. The difficulty of the task was manipulated by including a conflict between task-relevant (phonological) information and task-irrelevant (orthographic) information. The conflicting conditions included pairs of...
Article
Developmental differences in brain activation of 9- to 15-year-old children were examined during an auditory rhyme decision task to spoken words using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a group, children showed activation in the left superior/middle temporal gyri (BA 22, 21), right middle temporal gyrus (BA 21), dorsal (BA 45, pars op...
Article
Full-text available
Why females generally perform better on language tasks than males is unknown. Sex differences were here identified in children (ages 9-15) across two linguistic tasks for words presented in two modalities. Bilateral activation in the inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri and activation in the left fusiform gyrus of girls was greater than in b...
Article
Using Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined effective connectivity between three left hemisphere brain regions (inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus) and bilateral medial frontal gyrus in 12 children with reading difficulties (M age=12.4, range: 8.11-14.10) and 12 con...
Article
Developmental differences (9- to 15-year-olds) in effective connectivity in left hemisphere regions were examined using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Children completed spelling tasks in the visual and auditory modalities in which they were asked to determine if two words were spelled the same f...
Article
The current study examined developmental changes in activation and effective connectivity among brain regions during a phonological processing task, using fMRI. Participants, ages 9-15, were scanned while performing rhyming judgments on pairs of visually presented words. The orthographic and phonological similarity between words in the pair was ind...
Article
We examined the neural representations of orthographic and phonological processing in children, while manipulating the consistency between orthographic and phonological information. Participants, aged 9-15, were scanned while performing rhyming and spelling judgments on pairs of visually presented words. The orthographic and phonological similarity...
Article
Age-related differences (9- to 15-year-olds) in the neural correlates of mapping from phonology to orthography were examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were asked to determine if two spoken words had the same spelling for the rime (corresponding letters after the first consonant or consonant cluster). Some of th...
Article
Neuroimaging studies have suggested that left inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule and left middle temporal gyrus are critical for semantic processing in normal children. The goal of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to determine whether these regions are systematically related to semantic processin...
Article
The roles of the cerebellum and basal ganglia have typically been confined in the literature to motor planning and control. However, mounting evidence suggests that these structures are involved in more cognitive domains such as language processing. In the current study, we looked at effective connectivity (the influence that one brain region has o...
Article
Previous studies have shown that developmental changes in the structure and function of prefrontal regions can continue throughout childhood and adolescence. Our recent results suggested a role for the left inferior frontal cortex in modulating task-dependent shifts in effective connectivity when adults focus on orthographic versus phonological asp...
Article
The current study examined the neuro-cognitive network of visual word rhyming judgment in 14 children with dyslexia and 14 age-matched control children (8- to 14-year-olds) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In order to manipulate the difficulty of mapping orthography to phonology, we used conflicting and non-conflicting trials. Th...
Article
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to explore the neural correlates of semantic judgments to visual words in a group of 9- to 15-year-old children. Subjects were asked to indicate if word pairs were related in meaning. Consistent with previous findings in adults, children showed activation in bilateral inferior frontal gyri (Brod...
Article
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to explore the neural correlates of semantic judgments in the auditory modality in a group of 9- to 15-year-old children. Subjects were required to indicate if word pairs were related in meaning. Consistent with previous findings in adults, children showed activation in bilateral superior tempor...
Article
In neuroimaging studies of word reading in natural scripts, the effect of alphabeticality is often confounded with the effect of practice. We used an artificial script to separately manipulate the effects of practice and alphabeticality following training with and without explicit letter instructions. Participants received multi-session training in...
Article
Full-text available
We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine task-specific modulations of effective connectivity within a left-hemisphere language network during spelling and rhyming judgments on visually presented words. We identified sites showing task-specific activations for rhyming in the lateral temporal cortex (LTC) and for spelling in the intra...
Article
Several lines of evidence have recently provided a clear indication that word reading rate can be considered as an independent variable which influences comprehension as well as accuracy in reading. Thus, not only is fluent reading a critical characteristic of skilled (automatic) reading, it has been shown that faster reading does not necessarily i...
Article
In a previous study [Cogn. Brain Res. 16 (2003) 325], we found that letter knowledge did not evolve from implicit training on whole-word recognition in an artificial Morse-like script, although the participants were adults, experienced in alphabetical reading. Here we show minimal conditions in which letter knowledge may evolve in some individuals...
Article
We investigated the possibility that pattern segmentation skills, specifically, phonological decoding, evolve implicitly in adult readers given training in an artificial script. In this Morse-like script each phoneme was represented by 2-3 discrete symbols. Subjects were trained in five consecutive sessions, on reading six nonsense words using a fo...