Tal Yatziv

Tal Yatziv
Yale University | YU · Child Study Center

PhD
Postdoc, Yale Child Study Center

About

12
Publications
2,296
Reads
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42
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
41 Citations
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Additional affiliations
March 2020 - present
Yale University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2019 - September 2019
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Self-regulation in parenting
October 2017 - September 2018
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Introduction to statistics, Inferential statistics

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
This study examines the links between online maternal mentalization during mother-infant interaction, maternal sensitivity, and family triadic interaction while considering the cumulative role of two stressful contexts (cumulative stressful contexts; CSC): premature birth (a child-driven stressful context) and household chaos (an environment-driven...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal mentalization refers to a mother’s capacity to understand mental-states of herself and her child and to regard her child as a psychological agent. In mother-infant interactions, this capacity is commonly conceptualized as maternal mind-mindedness, which can be divided into two dimensions: appropriate and nonattuned interpretations of the i...
Article
Full-text available
Parental mentalization refers to parents’ capacity to treat their children as having minds of their own and consider the mental states underlying their behaviors. This study examined the roles of mothers’ executive functions (EFs), a group of processes supporting self-regulation, in two aspects of parental mentalization– spontaneity as measured by...
Article
Anxiety symptoms are common among women during pregnancy and the postpartum period, potentially having detrimental effects on both mother and child’s well-being. Perinatal maternal anxiety interferes with a core facet of adaptive caregiving: mothers’ sensitive responsiveness to infant affective communicative ‘cues.’ This review summarizes the curre...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic has been a demanding caregiving context for parents, particularly during lockdowns. In this study, we examined parental mentalization, parents’ proclivity to consider their own and their child’s mental states, during the pandemic, as manifested in mental-state language (MSL) on parenting social media. Parenting-related posts o...
Article
Full-text available
Parental reflective functioning (RF) is often cited as an important domain in which mothers with addictions struggle in their roles as parents, though the links between addiction and RF remain unclear. Exposure to attachment trauma associated with parental mental illness and substance use is commonly associated with both addiction and lower RF. We...
Article
Premature birth and maternal emotional distress constitute risk factors for feeding disorders. This study examined the roles of maternal cognitions in the link between prematurity, emotional distress and mother-infant maladaptive mealtime dynamics in a sample of 134 families (70 preterm, low medical risk; 64 full-term) followed longitudinally. Spec...
Data
Detailed description of executive functions tasks. (PDF)
Data
Exploratory regression analyses. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Over the last couple of decades, a vast amount of research has been dedicated to understanding the nature and the architecture of visual short-term memory (VSTM), the mechanism by which currently relevant visual information is maintained. According to discrete-capacity models, VSTM is constrained by a limited number of discrete representations held...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maternal mentalization refers to a mother’s capacity to understand mental states of herself and her child and to regard her child as a psychological agent. In mother-infant interactions, maternal mentalization can be divided into two dimensions: appropriate and nonattuned interpretations of the infants’ mental states. The appropriate dimension refe...
Article
Full-text available
The paper focuses on the question of what the (visual) perceptual differences are between individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and typically developing (TD) individuals. We argue against the view that autistic subjects have a deficiency in the most basic form of perceptual consciousness—namely, phenomenal consciousness. Instead, we main...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Maternal mentalization refers to a mother’s capacity to regard her child as a psychological agent and to understand her child’s mental states. Maternal mentalization is at the foundation of the parent-child relationship and has been established as a precursor of children’s socioemotional and cognitive development. Yet, surprisingly little attention has been given to sources of individual differences in this capacity, and specifically to the contribution of more basic cognitive processes to variability in maternal mentalization. The main goal of this project was to examine the role of cognitive control, focusing on executive functions (EFs), in maternal mentalization as reflected in real-time interpretation of the child’s mind (“online maternal mentalization”) or in maternal representations of the child beyond the context of a specific interaction (“offline maternal mentalization”). Two types of contexts that can modulate the contribution of cognitive control to individual differences in maternal mentalization were considered: (1) stressful context that, based on dual-processes models of cognition, are suggested to promote automaticity over the ability to control thoughts and behaviors; and (2) contexts that require exertion of self-regulation to understand the child’s mind, where control is hypothesized to have a larger contribution to individual differences in maternal mentalization.