Tainya Clarke

Tainya Clarke
Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattavile, Maryland, US · National Center for Health Statistics

PhD, MS

About

88
Publications
5,810
Reads
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2,162
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
1804 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - June 2015
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (88)
Article
The transient nature of construction work makes it difficult to conduct longitudinal worksite-based health promotion activities. As part of a workplace health assessment pilot study, we worked with a commercial lunch truck company to disseminate four types of health education materials including cancer screening, workplace injury prevention, fruit...
Article
Cancer affects a growing proportion of US workers. Factors contributing to whether they continue or return to work after cancer diagnosis include: age, physical and mental health, health insurance, education, and cancer site. The purpose of this study was to assess the complex relationships between health indicators and employment status for adult...
Article
Full-text available
Objective-This report presents national estimates of the use of complementary health approaches among adults in the United States across three time points. Trends in the use of selected complementary health approaches are compared for 2002, 2007, and 2012, and differences by selected demographic characteristics are also examined. Methods-Combined d...
Article
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Objective-This report presents national estimates of the use of complementary health approaches among children aged 4-17 years in the United States. Selected modalities are compared for 2007 and 2012 to examine changes over time. Methods-Data from the 2007 and 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed for this report. The combined...
Article
Introduction Physical inactivity is a risk factor for cancer morbidity and mortality, but its influence in colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors is understudied. We investigated sociodemographic, physically limiting, and behavioral predictors influencing leisure time physical activity (LTPA) among CRC survivors. Methods Pooled 1997-2010 National Healt...
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Full-text available
Key findings: Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2012 Use of nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements (17.9%) was greater than any other complementary health approach used by U.S. adults in 2012. The use of practitioner-based chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation was nearly twice as high in the West North Central region as in the...
Conference Paper
Background: The cure rate for pediatric cancers exceeds 75% and the number of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) is steadily increasing in the US. CCSs are at increased risk for recurrence, second primary cancers, late effects of treatment, and a variety of health issues that can be exacerbated by smoking. Mapping smoking prevalence among survivors...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Due to advances in cancer treatment, approximately 13.3 million cancer survivors are living in the US. Smoking among survivors decreases treatment efficacy and increases the risk of treatment complications, cancer recurrence, and the development of other chronic illnesses. Our objective in this study was to provide descriptive state-l...
Conference Paper
Background Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is undoubtedly beneficial to the public's health, as it can largely reduce the incidence of HPV-associated cancers in the population, yet general awareness of both the disease and vaccine remain low. Currently, 23 states have introduced legislation to require the vaccine, increase insurance-coverage r...
Conference Paper
Introduction: The Minority Stress Theory posits that sexual minorities experience more stress due to stigma, discrimination, and prejudice. Frequent exposure to social stressors can manifest in prolonged physiological dysregulation, leading to increased risk for disease and premature mortality. We examine differences in allostatic load (AL), a meas...
Conference Paper
Background: Cancer survivors who engage in physical activity (PA) benefit with improved quality of life, physical functioning, and reduced fatigue. PA has also been shown to reduce all-cause mortality, breast and colorectal-specific mortality, and cancer recurrence rates. While state-level prevalence of cancer and PA are readily accessible, informa...
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Full-text available
Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense system. A failure of this system brought on by mucus dehydration is common to both cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucus clearance rates are regulated by the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) and by ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Chronic...
Article
Introduction: While alcohol use has traditionally been thought to decrease with age, several recent studies have shown an increase in heavy drinking among retirees. Florida's unique population distribution that includes a higher proportion of elderly residents warrants an in-depth look at the drinking patterns in the elderly and how they may diffe...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Over the past decade the United States (US) has seen a decrease in advanced cancer diagnoses. There has also been an increase in the number of cancer survivors returning to work. Cancer screening behaviors among survivors may play an important role in their return-to-work process. Adherence to a post-treatment cancer screening protoc...
Conference Paper
Background: Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the US; however, over the past decade,there hasbeen a significant decrease in the incidence of advanced cancers. We investigated the association between adherence to cancer screening and reduced late stage diagnoses in the US population. Methods: Using incidence data from the 2000-2008 Surveilla...
Conference Paper
Objectives: The positive effects of employment on older worker mortality can be attenuated by various health and environment-related factors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a non-specific indicator of inflammation exposure. We compared mortality risk in older workers and non-workers across measured levels of CRP. Methods: Using pooled 1988-1994 Nation...
Article
To target populations at greatest risk ofdeveloping cancer, it is vital to understand the patterns ofrisk factors and screening behaviors along with cancer surveillance data. This study provides data on the prevalence of self-reported cancer history, can- cer risk factors, and cancer screening behaviors in Florida and compares them to rates in the...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Previous studies have shown differences in cancer screening behavior by region, occupation, and race-ethnicity. We investigated differences in adherence to recommended cancer screening, comparing Florida to the rest of the United States. Methods: Following American Cancer Society guidelines, we measured rates of adherence to mammograp...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Physical inactivity is a known risk factor for cancer morbidity and mortality, but its role in colorectal cancer survivors (CRCS) is understudied. Our objective was to determine which factors influence leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in CRCS. Methods: Data was pooled from the 1997-2010 National Health Interview Survey, an annu...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Alcohol consumption increases risk of cancers of the head and neck, colorectum, pancreas, liver, and breast. Up to 44% of cancer cases have been attributed to excessive alcohol intake, depending on cancer site. However, state-specific evaluations of excessive alcohol consumption are limited. Methods: We compared risky drinking (define...
Conference Paper
Background: In the US, the tobacco industry has increased marketing efforts targeting the lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) communities, utilizing nightclub/bar promotions and event sponsorships among other strategies to increase visibility and promote the use of their products. Despite these inequalities in tobacco marketing and the three-fold smok...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Infection with high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been shown to have a strong etiological relationship with cancers of the cervix, head and neck. Current recommendations for HPV vaccination are for 11-26 year old females to receive three doses of HPV vaccine. We investigated HPV vaccine receipt among US adults and also examined...
Conference Paper
Background: Research based on small convenience samples has documented that children of same-sex parents (SSP) are not disadvantaged when compared with their opposite-sex parent (OSP) counterparts. Given the controversy surrounding same-sex marriage and adoption rights across the United States, nationally-representative data are needed to evaluate...
Conference Paper
Background and Objective: Overall adherence to federal dietary guidelines among U.S. workers has not been evaluated. We calculated the Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2005 total score by occupational group. Methods: We pooled employed adults from the 1999-2004 NHANES and calculated their HEI-2005 total scores (based on the intake of fruits, vegetables,...
Conference Paper
Background: The emerging green-collar workforce, comprising the growing environmental segment of the economy focused on sustainability through green jobs, represents a new US workforce frontier. Population-based occupational health surveillance systems specifically for US green-collar workers have yet to be developed. We describe a methodological a...
Conference Paper
Introduction: The water requirement for individuals is estimated using one of several formulas that are based either on kilocalories consumed or body weight. These formulas have never been validated. Given that total water intake (TWI) per the Dietary Reference Intakes can be used as a proxy for the water requirement, we sought to develop the best...
Conference Paper
Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS), comprised of an abnormal clustering of risk factors places an individual at high risk for coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Weight loss can decrease these risks factors, but little is known about weight loss attempts among U.S. workers with MetS. Methods: We pooled data from the 1999-200...
Conference Paper
Background: Dietary intake has been examined by various occupations however, little is known about the relationship between occupation and adherence to Adequate Intake (AI) recommendations for the nutrient water. We compared self-reported water intake to the AI (≥3.7 and ≥2.7 liters for males and females, respectively) by occupational groups. Metho...
Conference Paper
Background: Young workers (≤24 years) are a large and relatively unstudied population in the US. Research suggests that among the young having a job can provide a variety of short- and long-term risks and/or benefits. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) provides a large and nationally-representative sample of all US civilian workers in whic...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Occupational stress, associated with increased rates of morbidity and possibly mortality, has become a serious US worker health issue. As a conceptual framework for the cumulative wear and tear on the body caused by physiological responses to stressors, "Allostatic Load (AL)" may serve as an objective global stress measure. We examine...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Preventive health behaviors, such as cancer screening often differ by education and income-level which are directly related to occupation. We examined cancer screening disparities by occupational sectors and US geographical regions among working aged adults (≥18yrs)in the US. Methods: Using NHIS cancer control modules (1997-2010) we i...
Article
Florida has the second highest incidence of melanoma in the United States, and more than 600 Floridians die from melanoma annually. Given the lack of population-based data on skin cancer screening among the different US geographic regions, we compared skin cancer screening rates among Floridians to those in the rest of the South, the Northeast, the...
Article
Background: Cancer is still one of the most prominent diseases of all times claiming more than 569,490 lives in 2010. Over the past decade the United States (U.S.), like many other industrialized and developed nations have seen a significant decrease in the incidence of cancers and have experienced an increase in the number of cancer survivors. The...
Article
Workplace injuries can have a substantial economic impact. Rates of workplace injuries differ across age groups, yet occupations/industry sectors at highest risk within age groups have not been identified. We examined workplace injury risk across industry sectors for three age groups using nationally representative U.S. data. Data from 1997 to 2009...
Article
Compared with residents of the rest of the nation, Floridians reported higher rates of skin cancer screening, which were also evident across a range of sociodemographic groups. Results suggest that regional variations in screening rates exist in the United States. However, it is unclear if early detection reduces mortality or morbidity from skin ca...
Conference Paper
Objective: Older U.S. workers are less likely to be injured at work, but the consequences of injuries are often more severe.Identification of sub-groups at increased risk of work-related injury risk and severity may inform and support workplace injury prevention efforts. We identified these risk groups in the US workforce using nationally-represent...
Conference Paper
Title: Impacts of Work and Work Characteristics on Smoking Behavior among Adolescents and Younger Adults OBJECTIVE: Examine the effects of work and work characteristics on smoking behaviors (current casual smoking and current frequent smoking) among adolescents (11-17) and younger adults (18-34) separately. METHODS: Four time points of the Nati...
Conference Paper
Background: Young workers (<24 years) are at increased risk for injury and possibly negative health behaviors (e.g. early tobacco or drug use); at the same time, research has shown that young people who work may attain higher employment rates and better wages as long as a decade after high school graduation. Methods: Using data derived from the Nat...
Conference Paper
Introduction Education initiatives on HIV testing and the advent of highly active antiretroviral treatment have brought about a steep decline in HIV mortality rates among the general US population since the mid 1990's. Very few studies have observed these trends in the US working population. The purpose of the study is to compare HIV mortality and...
Conference Paper
The risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) within the workplace can be reduced by promoting consumption of heart-healthy nutrients (HHN) and improving cardiovascular fitness (CVF). Several studies conducted on workers found that nutrition interventions decreased CVD risk. However, little information is available regarding the relationship between HHN...
Conference Paper
Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine patterns of situational, occasional, and established smoking behaviors among young adults who either continued their education or went straight-to-work. Research Design and Methods: Cross-sectional data were collected via telephone interviews and were designed to be representative of the targeted F...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Structural equation modeling (SEM) has undergone major advances in the last 10 to 15 years including a merger with generalized linear modeling, mortality hazard modeling, and the incorporation of estimation for complex survey data. Traditional modeling capabilities available in the SEM framework include streamline mediation and moderatio...
Conference Paper
The US Surgeon General has reported that secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has deleterious health effects. However, individuals are frequently unaware of their SHS exposure and well validated self-report measures are not readily available. The aim of this study is to validate self-reported SHS exposure by comparing reported responses with salivary co...
Conference Paper
Objective: Work-related injuries comprise one-third of all injuries and can have a substantial economic impact. Rates and nature of work-related injuries at extremes of work-life differ from those of middle-age group, yet occupations at highest risk within each age group have not been identified. We examined work-related injury risk across industry...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Approximately 40% of the more than 1 million Americans newly diagnosed with cancer each year are working-age adults. Many of these persons continue to work during and after cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the complex relationship between health indicators and employment status cancer survivors of working age....
Conference Paper
Introduction: The number of Single mother households in the U.S. is higher than ever before. Though the annual income and employment among this group has increased, self-reported health has declined. The purpose of the study was to investigate differences in healthcare utilization and access among employed and unemployed single mothers. Methods:...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Despite high smoking rates, there has been limited development of tobacco assessment and smoking cessation outreach strategies targeting construction workers. We report the prevalence of active and passive tobacco smoke exposure from a convenience sample of construction workers visiting a lunch truck at the construction site. METHODS:...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Metabolic syndrome portends a significant risk for coronary arterial/cardiovascular disease. Low cardiovascular fitness is also a risk for all vascular and arterial diseases. The association between metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular fitness, and occupation category is undetermined among working U.S. adults. METHODS: We analyzed data o...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Illicit drug use that commences during young adulthood represents an important public health concern. The social, economic, and health consequences of illicit drug use in adolescence may persist throughout young adulthood and negatively impact employment opportunities. We examine the association between employment status, occupation type...
Article
Through use of a nationally representative database, we examined the variability in both self-rated health and overall mortality risk within occupations across the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) Industry Sectors, as well as between the occupations within the NORA Industry sectors. Using multiple waves of the National Health Interview...
Article
Introduction: The five-year survival rates for young adult cancers continue to increase. Nonetheless, these young adult survivors may experience health complications or physical late effects that contribute to negative lifestyle behaviors potentiating the use of gateway drugs (e.g. alcohol and cigarettes). Examination of these negative behaviors du...
Article
To explore cardiovascular fitness in 40 occupations using a nationally representative sample of the US population. Respondents aged 18 to 49 years (N = 3354) from the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were evaluated for cardiovascular fitness and classified into low, moderate, and high levels. Comparisons were made among...
Article
Full-text available
Approximately 40% of Americans annually diagnosed with cancer are working-age adults. Using a nationally representative database, we characterized differences in health status and occupation of working cancer survivors and persons without cancer. Cross-sectional data pooled from the 1997-2009 US National Health Interview Survey for adults with self...
Article
Introduction: Years of research have confirmed a causal association between lung cancer and chronic exposure to tobacco products. It is estimated that active smoking is responsible for approximately 90 % of lung cancer cases. In 2009, lung cancer accounted for approximately 28% of all cancer deaths. However, there have been significant improvements...
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Full-text available
Novel low-cost approaches for conducting rapid health assessments and health promotion interventions among underserved worker groups are needed. Recruitment and participation of construction workers is particularly challenging due to their often transient periods of work at any one construction site, and their limited time during work to participat...
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This paper reviews the literature describing research performed over the past decade on the known and possible exposures and human health effects associated with Florida red tides. These harmful algal blooms are caused by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, and similar organisms, all of which produce a suite of natural toxins known as brevetoxins....
Article
To examine indicators of health care access and utilization among children of working and nonworking single mothers in the United States, the authors used data on unmarried women participating in the 1997-2008 National Health Interview Survey who financially supported children under 18 years of age (n = 21,842). Stratified by maternal employment, t...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Evidence suggests that some groups are at a greater risk of work-related eye injuries given the increased occupational exposure to hazards leading to ocular injuries. Despite health and safety requirements, eye injuries continue to occur in the workplace. Identification of socio-demographic correlates of workplace eye injuries using a po...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Many of the risk factors for arthritis are poorly understood. Whether arthritis stems from one's occupation or socio-behavioral risk factors, it increases the risk of job loss. We examined the prevalence and trends of physician-diagnosed arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia by occupation, the new National Occupa...
Conference Paper
Objective: Research on the diet of workers is limited. We examined occupational differences in diet using nationally-representative US data. Methods: Data from 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were pooled for workers >20 years (n=7,251). Values were calculated in percentage of total calories from macronutrients (i.e., fat,...
Conference Paper
OBJECTIVE: Over 20% of US Children live in households headed by single women; several of these families depend on public health care. Eligibility for public assistance is influenced by the mother's annual income; many working women may earn too much to qualify, but not enough to afford health insurance. We examined 6 predictors of unmet health need...
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Full-text available
Differences in the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors among occupational groups have been found in several studies. Certain types of workers (such as shift workers) may have a greater risk for metabolic syndrome, a precursor of CVD. The objective of this study was to assess the differences in prevalence and risk of meta...
Article
Introduction: Approximately 40% of the more than 1 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year are working-age adults, likewise more than 11 million people in the U.S. are cancer survivors. Given almost 50% of cancer survivors are under 65 years of age, a large proportion of them return to work after treatment or even maintain regular work sc...
Article
Construction workers are frequently exposed to awkward work postures and physical demands that can lead to work-related musculoskeletal disorders. There has been limited development of assessment and outreach strategies targeting this highly mobile workforce in general and especially among Hispanic construction workers. We report the prevalence of...
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Full-text available
This study assessed the relationship between employment status and mortality over a 2-year period among a nationally representative sample of young adults aged 18 to 24 years (n = 121,478, representing more than 21 million US young adults). By using data from the 1986-2000 National Health Interview Survey and its public-use mortality follow-up thro...
Article
A substantial morbidity and mortality burden attributable to the influenza virus is observed annually in the United States. Healthcare workers are an occupational group at increased risk of exposure, demonstrated to transmit influenza to their patient populations, and vital to the care of these patient populations. The prevention of the spread of t...
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Full-text available
In previous studies we demonstrated statistically significant changes in reported symptoms for lifeguards, general beach goers, and persons with asthma, as well as statistically significant changes in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in asthmatics, after exposure to brevetoxins in Florida red tide (Karenia brevis bloom) aerosols. In this study we ex...
Article
Full-text available
One of the greatest threats to the native ecosystems in any part of the world is the invasion and permanent colonization of ecosystems by non-native species. Florida is no exception to this biological invasion, and is currently colonized by an extensive variety of exotic plant species. Originally imported from Asia over 30years ago, Old World Climb...