Taeku Lee

Taeku Lee
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · Charles and Louise Travers Department of Political Science

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55
Publications
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981
Citations

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Are appeals to discredit mainstream media reporting of political news in the guise of “fake news” merely a diversion from more fundamental threats to democratic politics and policymaking? Or is the emerging belief in “fake news” itself a looming threat? Using data from the Voter Study Group’s panel survey, we examine the relationship between disbel...
Article
Full-text available
This article proposes a new statistical method to measure persuasion within small groups, and applies this approach to a large-scale randomized deliberative experiment. The authors define the construct of ‘persuasion’ as a change in the systematic component of an individual's preference, separate from measurement error, that results from exposure t...
Article
Full-text available
The ideal of deliberation requires that citizens engage in reasonable discussion despite disagreements. In practice, if their experience is to match this normative ideal, participants in an actual deliberation should prefer moderate disagreement to conflict-free discussion within homogeneous groups, and to conflict-driven discussion where differenc...
Article
We evaluate the dynamics of persuasion within small groups using a large scale randomized deliberative experiment. In particular, we examine whether persuasion in this context is driven by the composition of small groups to which participants were randomly assigned. In these discussions focusing on U.S. fiscal policy, ideological persuasion occurs...
Article
Since the advent of public opinion polling, scholars have extensively documented the relationship between survey response and interviewer characteristics, including race, ethnicity, and gender. This paper extends this literature to the domain of language-of-interview, with a focus on Latino political opinion. We ascertain whether, and to what degre...
Article
This paper evaluates the dynamics of small group persuasion within a large scale randomized deliberative experiment, in particular whether persuasion in this context is driven by the ideological composition of small groups, to which participants were randomly assigned. In these discussions focusing on U.S. fiscal policy, ideological persuasion occu...
Book
Over the past four decades, the foreign-born population in the United States has nearly tripled, from about 10 million in 1965 to more than 30 million today. This wave of new Americans comes in disproportionately large numbers from Latin America and Asia, a pattern that is likely to continue in this century. In Transforming Politics, Transforming A...
Article
Both the plight of African American young people and their feelings and thoughts about this plight are major issues of concern in U.S. politics. In 2003, the Black Youth Project was launched, with funding by the Ford Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, to promote both social scientific analysis and public understanding of these issue...
Article
We use data from a large scale deliberative experiment to evaluate the dynamics of small group persuasion. We evaluate whether persuasion is driven by the ideological composition of small groups, and whether ideological persuasion tends to be polarizing. In addition, we test for the presence of persuasion that is net of ideological considerations,...
Article
This paper begins with several founding observations. First, the current legal framework for protecting voting rights in the United States has been dramatically destabilized by Supreme Court decisions re-interpreting the protections against minority dilution. While the VRA was founded under the clear purpose of increasing the voice and power of min...
Article
This essay analyzes basic demographic trends and patterns of political participation for Koreans in the United States and considers the prospects for an engaged and organized Korean-American political voice.
Article
April 29th, 1992 started in Hyde Park, Illinois as a sunny, bitingly cold Wednesday. In the middle of spring quarter of my first year of doctoral studies, the day raced by with buzzing thoughts on my Aristotle and rational choice Marxism seminars. Then, as I sat down to dinner and turned on the television to follow the previous day's events in the...
Article
Where do Asian Americans stand when it comes to public policy? In what ways are they most likely to participate in politics in order to exert their influence in public policy making? More often than not, the answer to these questions is mired in assumptions, anecdotes, and selective evidence because until only very recently, little systematic, nati...
Article
In this section, researchers examine the policy priorities and data needs regarding civil rights issues affecting Asian Americans (and, where relevant and possible, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders [NHPIs]). To the uninitiated, the policy relevance of civil rights issues confronting AANHPI members may seem unusual, exotic, or misplaced. Each...
Article
Does public support for government action and intervention on a health condition or epidemic depend on whom the public thinks if most vulnerable? Using a unique set of embedded experiments, we test two treatment dimensions of public support: who is affected (children or elderly; Whites or African Americans); what the illness is (diabetes, depressio...
Article
In this section, researchers examine the policy priorities and data needs regarding civil rights issues affecting Asian Americans (and, where relevant and possible, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders [NHPIs]). To the uninitiated, the policy relevance of civil rights issues confronting AANHPI members may seem unusual, exotic, or misplaced. Each...
Article
Where do Asian Americans stand when it comes to public policy? In what ways are they most likely to participate in politics in order to exert their influence in public policy making? More often than not, the answer to these questions is mired in assumptions, anecdotes, and selective evidence because until only very recently, little systematic, nati...
Article
Asian Americans are underrepresented in almost every measure of political incorporation and are scarcely represented in national politics. While they naturalize at comparable rates to other recently-migrated minority groups and share many of the features of mainstream voters, they often slip through the cracks when it comes participating in the pol...
Article
The ideal of deliberation requires that citizens engage in reasonable discussion despite disagreements. In practice, if their experience is to match this normative ideal, participants in an actual deliberation should prefer moderate disagreement to conflict-free discussion within homogeneous groups, and to conflict-driven discussion where differenc...
Book
This chapter studies the implications of the socioeconomic and demographic factors on public opinion among Asian Americans. The first part reviews the present social science research on Asian-American political attitudes, and then discusses the outlines of Asian-American political partisanship and attitudes on some relevant political issues. It end...
Article
Full-text available
In the 2008 presidential primaries, Barack Obama seemed to have a problem connecting with Asian American voters, as he lost heavily to Hillary Clinton in states such as California and New Jersey. Many speculated that race-based considerations played a significant role in Asian Americans' overwhelming support for Clinton over Obama, with conjectures...
Article
Little controversy remains about how the United States has changed demographically since the mid-1960s. Far more controversial is whether this change is bringing about a new politics of race. This article argues that a key to settling this debate is a clearer specification of the identity-to-politics link - the nexus from a population defined by sh...
Article
Since 1970 the proportion of African Americans identifying with the Democratic Party has declined to the point where over 40 percent of blacks now identify as Independent or Republican. We find that traditional accounts pointing to class gains or increased conservatism among blacks fare poorly in explaining declining Democratic identification. Rath...
Article
Little controversy remains about the profound shifts in the demographic landscape of the United States since the mid-1960s. Far more controversial is whether this transformation will bring about a new politics of race. This paper argues that a key to settling this debate is a clearer specification of the “identity-to-politics” link: the nexus betwe...
Article
Health policy experts have recently sounded the warning about the severe health and economic consequences of America's growing rates of obesity. Despite this fact, obesity has only begun to enter America's political consciousness and we have little information about what average Americans think of obesity or whether they support obesity-related pol...
Article
Much has been made of the dramatic influx of immigrants to the United States since the mid-1960s. This “Fourth Wave” of migration is remarkable not just for its sheer numbers, but also for its ethnic diversity, with newcomers disproportionately arriving from Asia and Latin America. Much too has been made of the changes in how the state classifies a...
Article
What motivates us to change our opinions during times of political protest and social unrest? To investigate this question, Taeku Lee's smartly argued book looks to the critical struggle over the moral principles, group interests, and racial animosities that defined public support for racial policies during the civil rights movement, from the late...
Article
We examine fluctuations in the predicted educational attainment of newly arrived legal U.S. immigrants between 1972 and 1999 by combining data from the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service with the Current Population Survey. A mid-1980s decline gave way to a noticeable improvement in the skill base of the immigrant population between 1987 an...
Article
A growing body of research shows the influence of political elites on the public's policy preferences. Yet we know little about the dynamics of elite influence or the cognitive mechanisms through which elite signals are interpreted in "real time"-that is, as public deliberation over a policy initiative actually evolves. In this paper, we present pr...
Article
This paper extends the well-studied phenomenon of interviewer effects (race-, gender-, and ethnicity-of-interviewer) to the yet unexamined domain of language-of-interview. Using data from the 1989-1990 Latino National Politics Survey, the paper finds that the answers that survey respondents give differ, sometimes markedly, depending on whether an i...
Article
Over the past several years there has been a striking increase in policy-makers' attention to health care reform. This paper explores whether there has been a corresponding shift in popular attitudes and identifies factors that may have changed these attitudes. The first part of the analysis relies on survey data collected between 1975 and 1989 to...
Article
Full-text available
Many deliberative theorists assume that inequality is fatal for constructive deliberative discourse. Using data from a randomized experiment, we demonstrate that, in contrast to this expectation, satisfaction with deliberation is maximized at moderate levels of knowledge disparities, and this view is shared both by those with low initial levels of...

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