T. P. Robinson

T. P. Robinson
Curtin University · School of Earth and Planetary Sciences

PhD

About

37
Publications
13,394
Reads
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1,135
Citations
Introduction
Dr Todd Robinson is the Course Coordinator of Geospatial Intelligence at Curtin University. He lectures in the areas of Remote Sensing, Geospatial Analysis, Spatial Modelling, Spatial Databases and Algorithms. Research areas include SDMs and GDMs, species detection, rangeland condition monitoring, conservation, landscape genetics and refugia. He is the academic lead on a project developing a suite of tools for GDV detection and monitoring with FrontierSI, and key mining proponents.
Additional affiliations
February 2008 - November 2021
Curtin University
Position
  • Senior Lecturer

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
Restoration interventions require knowledge on the suitability of seed sources. Provenance delineation for ecological restoration of degraded environments has begun to incorporate genome-wide information on adaptive variation, but this has only been completed on a small number of plant species. Rarely is provenance delineation using a genomics appr...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation practitioners require cost-effective and repeatable remotely sensed data for assistive monitoring. This paper tests the ability of standard remotely piloted aircraft (DJI Phantom 4 Pro) imagery to discriminate between plant species in a rangeland environment. Flights were performed over two 0.3–0.4 ha exclusion plot sites, established...
Article
Full-text available
Feral cats are one of the most damaging predators on Earth. They can be found throughout most of Australia’s mainland and many of its larger islands, where they are adaptable predators responsible for the decline and extinction of many species of native fauna. Managing feral cat populations to mitigate their impacts is a conservation priority. Cont...
Article
Full-text available
Parasitism is a pervasive phenomenon in nature with the relationship between species driving evolution in both the parasite and host. Due to their host‐dependent lifestyle, parasites may adapt to the abiotic environment in ways that differ from their hosts or from free living relatives; yet rarely has this been assessed. Here, we test two competing...
Article
Sympatric tree species are subject to similar climatic drivers, posing a question as to whether they display comparable adaptive responses. However, no study has explicitly examined local adaptation of co‐occurring parasitic and autotrophic plant species to the abiotic environment. Here we test the hypotheses that a generalist parasitic tree would...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization has an important and often positive role in plant evolution. However, it can also have negative consequences for species. Two closely related species of Ornduffia are endemic to the Porongurup Range in the South West Australian Global Biodiversity Hotspot. The rare Ornduffia calthifolia is found exclusively on the summits, while O. ma...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Understanding how landscape features affect gene flow is critical to connectivity conservation and restoration management. Here, we examined the relationship between functional connectivity (gene flow) and structural connectivity (area and spatial configuration of habitats) in three co‐occurring short‐range plant taxa in an ancient terrestrial...
Article
Full-text available
Determining patterns of plant diversity on granite inselbergs is an important task for conservation biogeography due to mounting threats. However, beyond the tropics there are relatively few quantitative studies of floristic diversity, or consideration of these patterns and their environmental, biogeographic, and historical correlates for conservat...
Article
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The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to ecological monitoring research, though with little standardisation or comparability in methodological approaches and research aims. We reviewed the international peer-reviewed literature in order to explore the potential limitations on the feas...
Article
Full-text available
The high species endemism characteristic of many of the world's terrestrial island systems provides a model for studying evolutionary patterns and processes, yet there has been no synthesis of studies to provide a systematic evaluation of terrestrial island systems in this context. The banded iron formations (BIFs) of south‐western Australia are an...
Article
This paper presents a novel spatial market segmentation method to determine key user groups of a train station (such as gender, age and access mode), based on the size and shape of the station catchment area of each group. Two new indices – area ratio and composite ratio – are developed to quantify the importance of user groups for a train station....
Article
The banded ironstone formation (BIF) ranges of south-western Australia are prominent landforms in a flat landscape and host a diverse flora. Plant diversity is expected to have a positive relationship with environmental heterogeneity in these ranges. However, there has been a lack of high-resolution data to assess how fine-scale environmental varia...
Article
Full-text available
Banded Ironstone Formation (BIF) ranges feature numerous rare and endemic plant species. We tested whether non-occurrence in neighbouring ranges is due to habitat dissimilarity across five groups of proximal ranges for three sets of species (18 taxa). Set 1 comprised 15 BIF-specialist species centred on the Helena and Aurora Range (HAR) Set 2, of o...
Article
After over 50000 years of interaction between Aboriginal people and changing climates, south-western Australia’s tall forests were first logged less than 200 years ago, initiating persistent conflict. Recent conservation advocacy has resulted in the protection of 49% of these tall forests in statutory reserves, providing an opportunity to implement...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the influence of land-use/land-cover (LULC) change on land surface temperature (LST) in Dhaka Megacity, Bangladesh during a period of rapid urbanisation. LST was derived from Landsat 5 TM scenes captured in 1990, 2000 and 2011 and compared to contemporaneous LULC maps. We compared index-based and linear spectral mixture anal...
Article
Background and Aims Low-altitude mountains constitute important centres of diversity in landscapes with little topographic variation, such as the Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR). They also provide unique climatic and edaphic conditions that may allow them to function as refugia. We investigate whether the Porongurups (altitude 655 m)...
Article
A train station catchment area delineates the spatial territory from which the users of a train station are drawn. The size and shape of this catchment can be influenced by a variety of factors, such as the transport network, the location of stations and the service quality they offer, as well as the land use density and diversity in the transport...
Article
Bounded by ocean and desert, the isolated, predominately Mediterranean-climate region of south-western Australia (SWA) includes nine bioregions (circa 44 million hectares). The ecological integrity of the landscapes in this global biodiversity hotspot has been compromised by deforestation, fragmentation, exploitation, and introduced biota. Nature a...
Article
Full-text available
Although there has been a significant focus on evaluating accessibility to facilities, the differences between age groups and/or mode of access to train stations is less clear. This paper compares perceived and measured accessibility to train stations among three age groups: young adults (18-24), middle aged adults (25-59) and elderly adults (60+)...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the location and extent of granite outcrops (GOs) in the Southwest Australian Floristic Region is important to understand their role as refugia. We present a methodology to map GOs using biannual Landsat TM imagery. An adaptive vegetation cover mask capitalising on seasonal differences, combined with a supervised classification, allowe...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) can provide useful information for managing biological invasions, such as identification of priority areas for early detection or for determining containment boundaries. However, prediction of invasive species using SDMs can be challenging because they typically violate the core assumption of being at equilibrium...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The assessment of rangeland condition plays an integral role in ensuring the sustainability of Western Australia’s (WA) pastoral leases. Current ground-based traverses provide a useful indication and summary of rangeland condition, but traversing is largely restricted to existing tracks and will not identify degraded areas out of sight of the trave...
Article
Historical archives of aerial photography provide a rare data source for quantifying rates and characterising patterns of plant invasions. Canopies of a ca. 70-year-old exotic mesquite population in Western Australia were extracted from a temporal series of panchromatic aerial photography over an area of 450ha using unsupervised classification. Non...
Article
Invasive plants pose serious threats to economic, social and environmental interests throughout the world. Developing strategies for their management requires a range of information that is often impractical to collect from ground based surveys. In other cases, such as retrospective analyses of historical invasion rates and patterns, data is rarely...
Article
Mapping the distribution and abundance of invasive plants is a high priority, but establishing cost-effective and practical techniques at appropriate scales remains elusive. Mesquite is a highly invasive shrub that cannot currently be reliably distinguished from other plant species using remote sensing technologies, at least not at accuracies neces...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Exotic plants pose a significant threat to biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and productivity on both local and global scales. A key requirement for effective management of invasive species is the ability to reliably identify their location and distribution across landscapes. Remote sensing offers great potential as a source for extracting specie...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we implement and compare the accuracy of ordinary kriging, lognormal ordinary kriging, inverse distance weighting (IDW) and splines for interpolating seasonally stable soil properties (pH, electric conductivity and organic matter) that have been demonstrated to affect yield production.The choice of the exponent value for IDW and spli...
Article
Yield maps contain a wealth of information and can be an important tool for making informed decisions on paddock management. However, yield datasets obtained from combine harvesters often have many errors arising from a variety of sources. It is therefore important to attempt to rectify as many of these errors as possible so that the yield map repr...
Article
Full-text available
In order to develop coherent management programs aimed at halting and restoring the conversion of grassland to woodland it is necessary to identify, among other data prerequisites, the rate of change. We used a technique based on segmentation and unsupervised classification to extract vegetation in a mesquite dominated area from a temporal dataset...
Article
Full-text available
Site-specific crop management requires matching resource application and agronomic practices with soil and crop requirements, as they vary in space and time within a field. As such, information on the composition of soils at either farm or paddock scale is essential. Soil composition over an entire paddock might not be uniform. For instance, it may...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
To develop economical, accurate and scalable remote sensing methodologies improving ecological monitoring outcomes
Project
Paramount to the success of restoration efforts is the suitability of seed sources for the area under restoration. Accordingly, information on species genetic variation is required. We will use a combination of NGS data (DARTSEQ) and multivariate spatial analysis to assess genetic diversity (both neutral and adaptive) across geographical and ecological gradients