Szőnyi András

Szőnyi András
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research | FMI · Neurobiology Research

MD PhD
Research @ FMI Basel

About

15
Publications
2,651
Reads
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516
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
398 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Szőnyi András worked at the Department of Cellular and Network Neurobiology at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest. Currently he is working at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel. Website: szonyiandras.hu
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Andreas Lüthi Lab
September 2014 - June 2019
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Freund Tamas Lab, under Nyiri Gabor as PI
August 2006 - September 2014
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Freund Tamas lab, under Nyiri Gabor as PI

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Experience-dependent changes in behavior are mediated by long-term functional modifications in brain circuits. Activity-dependent plasticity of synaptic input is a major underlying cellular process. Although we have a detailed understanding of synaptic and dendritic plasticity in vitro, little is known about the functional and plastic properties of...
Article
Keeping tabs on bad experiences Identifying the neural basis underlying how we acquire, process, and store negative experiences could help the search for effective treatments for mood disorders. Szőnyi et al. used a range of neuroscientific tools to elucidate the role of a specific neural circuit that originates in the median raphe region of the mu...
Article
The nucleus incertus in the brainstem orchestrates the formation of contextual memories
Article
What inhibits the inhibitors? In the hippocampus, each memory trace is encoded by a specific subset of pyramidal cells. The other pyramidal cells must be actively excluded from the memory encoding process by inhibition, which is done by selective dendrite-targeting interneurons. Szőnyi et al. found that γ-aminobutyric acid–releasing (GABAergic) cel...
Article
Full-text available
The basal forebrain cholinergic system is widely assumed to control cortical functions via non-synaptic transmission of a single neurotransmitter. Yet, we find that mouse hippocampal cholinergic terminals invariably establish GABAergic synapses, and their cholinergic vesicles dock at those synapses only. We demonstrate that these synapses do not co...
Preprint
Full-text available
The basal forebrain cholinergic system is widely assumed to control cortical functions via non-synaptic transmission of a single neurotransmitter, acetylcholine. Yet, using immune-electron tomographic, molecular anatomical, optogenetic and physiological techniques, we find that mouse hippocampal cholinergic terminals invariably establish synapses a...
Article
Full-text available
The median raphe region (MRR, which consist of MR and paramedian raphe regions) plays a crucial role in regulating cortical as well as subcortical network activity and behavior, while its malfunctioning may lead to disorders, such as schizophrenia, major depression, or anxiety. Mouse MRR neurons are classically identified on the basis of their sero...
Article
Full-text available
The median raphe region (MRR) is thought to be serotonergic and plays an important role in the regulation of many cognitive functions. In the hippocampus (HIPP), the MRR exerts a fast excitatory control, partially through glutamatergic transmission, on a subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons that are key regulators of local network activity. Howe...
Article
Full-text available
Three functionally different populations of perisomatic interneurons establish GABAergic synapses on hippocampal pyramidal cells: parvalbumin (PV)-containing basket cells, type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-positive basket cells both of which target somata, and PV-positive axo-axonic cells that innervate axon initial segments. Using electron microsc...
Article
Full-text available
GABA (gamma-aminobutyric-acid), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, exerts depolarizing (excitatory) actions during development and this GABAergic depolarization cooperates with NMDARs (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors) to drive spontaneous synchronous activity (SSA) that is fundamentally important for developing neuronal network...
Article
Full-text available
Early γ-aminobutyric acid mediated (GABAergic) synaptic transmission and correlated neuronal activity are fundamental to network formation; however, their regulation during early postnatal development is poorly understood. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important retrograde messenger at glutamatergic synapses, and it was recently shown to play an importan...
Article
Full-text available
GABAergic inhibition plays a central role in the control of pyramidal cell ensemble activities; thus, any signaling mechanism that regulates inhibition is able to fine-tune network patterns. Here, we provide evidence that the retrograde nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP cascade triggered by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation plays a role in the control of hippo...
Article
Full-text available
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, the pathomechanism of which is not yet fully understood. Excitotoxicity is known to be involved in the development of HD and antiglutamatergic agents may, therefore, have beneficial neuroprotective effects. One of these agents is the tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA),...

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Project (1)