Sylvaine Tuncer

Sylvaine Tuncer
King's Business School · Public Services Management and Organisation

PhD

About

27
Publications
2,423
Reads
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182
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
180 Citations
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Introduction
I’m a sociologist interested in social organisation and technologies, observable in action, interactions and collaboration. My approach is based in ethnography, conversation analysis, and ethnomethodology. I have studied a diversity of settings, such as such as video-mediated communication, the everyday work in office organisation and surveillance centres for electronic monitoring, the use of urban, shared mobilities through platforms and smartphone applications, and human-robot interactions.

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Welfare organisations across the world are becoming more streamlined with less time for building relationships with clients, rendering non-governmental organisations increasingly important for welfare provision. In this paper, we investigate an understudied area in social work: the small talk through which volunteer organisations conduct social wor...
Article
Full-text available
Our work is motivated by the idea that social robots can help inclusive processes in groups of children, focusing on the case of children who have newly arrived from a foreign country and their peers at school. Building on an initial study where we tested different robot behaviours and recorded children’s interactions mediated by a robot in a game,...
Conference Paper
Artificial agents’ smiling behaviour is likely to influence their likeability and the quality of user experience. While studies of human interaction highlight the importance of smile dynamics, this feature is often lacking in artificial agents, presenting a design opportunity. We developed a virtual motivational therapist with four smiling behaviou...
Article
Assistive technologies can significantly increase older adults' independent living if these technologies are designed to meet their needs and abilities. This study investigates conditions and present possibilities for assistive technology to provide physical and cognitive support to older adults in a specific domestic task, which is cooking a meal...
Article
Using video recordings as data to study how dyads follow instructional videos to achieve practical tasks, this article focuses on how partici- pants coordinate the temporality of the video with that of their task by pausing the video. We examine three types of pausing, each display- ing participants’ online understanding of the instructions and dif...
Article
Le développement du placement sous bracelet électronique comme peine de substitution a conduit à la création de pôles centralisateurs de surveillance, où des agents traitent systématiquement les alarmes en appelant les personnes placées sous surveillance électronique au téléphone. Après avoir situé ces alarmes dans le contexte plus large de ce disp...
Article
Full-text available
While the legalisation of and policies around e-scooters remain the cause of much debate worldwide, this article sheds lights on e-scooter users’ current practices and their interactions with pedestrians in the city. Taking an ethnomethodological approach to public space and mobility, we use video recordings of e-scooter riders to show, firstly, ho...
Preprint
This special issue aims to conceptualise a recurrent problem within studies on objects in interaction by bringing together a series of six empirical studies of object-centred interactions and practices. In this editorial, we first show how video-based studies of interactions in the last two decades have been hinting at our problem. Then, we describ...
Article
This article studies a type of object-centred sequences common in biochemistry labs: scientists jointly orienting to a problematic object of work, manipulating it, inspecting it, talking about it, to see the same features of it, agreeing on their problematic character, and aiming to progress the scientific task with this object. Focusing on the ear...
Conference Paper
Instructional videos have become an important site of everyday learning. This paper explores how these videos are used to complete practical tasks, analyzing video-recorded interactions between pairs of users. Users need to repeatedly pause their videos to be able to follow the instructions, and we document how pausing is used to coordinate and int...
Article
This article builds on ethnomethodological, conversation analytic research on object transfers: how participants hand over objects to one another. By analyzing video recordings of mundane (cars) and institutional interactions (laboratories), we focus on situations where an object is central to and talked about in the joint course of action. We focu...
Article
This article studies how co-present workers can join in a co-present interaction they were not previously involved in, thus challenging initial participants' interactional preserve. It is based on ethnographically-informed analyses of video-recorded interactions in workplaces, in English as a lingua franca and in French. Potential joiners' recurren...
Article
In this article, we show how a common type of material environment in office organizations, namely offices with doors left open, enables and sustains the initiation of unscheduled, informal encounters. Using video recordings of naturally occurring interactions, we identify and describe a recurrent practice whereby visitors, mainly through their emb...
Conference Paper
In this paper we report on a pervasive practice in video-mediated communication: where participants show one another one or more objects. This is a distinct activity from others considered by researchers of video-mediated technologies that focus on a face-to-face orientation, or just on the support necessary to help people to refer to objects. We f...
Article
Full-text available
This article starts from the observation that social scientists using video to study naturally-occurring interactions are often questioned about the reliability of their data, by wider audiences, but also by scholars who raised concerns early on about how the recording device would modify the participants' conduct. The study uses 47 video extracts...
Article
This article addresses informal interactions in offices by analyzing video recordings of naturally-occurring, unscheduled visits in offices. We focus on closings, and more particularly on the embodied resource of walking away by drawing heavily on a previous study. We show that fellow institutional members rely on a similar set of methods, types of...
Thesis
La thèse donne à voir et à comprendre en quoi consistent les organisations et l’expérience du travail dans les organisations à partir de l’analyse d’interactions verbales, corporelles et matérielles filmées dans des bureaux. Développant une approche praxéologique originale du côté de la recherche sur les organisations, nous contribuons en outre aux...
Chapter
Trying to grasp multi-activity within a praxeological perspective, we focus on a set of situations in which participants experiencing some summoning event, such as a phone ring, recognisably 'put on hold' some other involvement, and demonstrably orient towards the current relevance of two or more streams of activity. We will endeavour to show (a) t...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The global landscape of urban transport is changing rapidly and at an accelerating rate, to the point that “disruption is the new normal”. Within this context, public bike-sharing schemes are increasingly part of a dynamic urban transport landscape. More recently, forms of what has been called “micro-mobility” are emerging, broadening the shared mobility offering in cities to include electric scooters, hoverboards, and segways, amongst others. The benefits of cycling have been widely documented and evidenced; however, more knowledge is needed in order to assess whether these benefits are within the reach of all population subgroups, when it comes to considering these and other shared systems. While bike-share schemes and emerging micro-mobility options may make claims to be socially inclusive by supporting modal shift and providing alternatives for those marginalised by private car based mobility, the reality is often different: users of public bike-sharing schemes, like cyclists in general, tend to have higher incomes, high levels of formal education, and be disproportionately white, middle aged and male. Inequality issues are crucial in planning a transition towards a more sustainable and just mobility future. There is an inherently spatial dimension in access to these emerging forms of transport, in both the distribution of provision and the socio-demographic profile of users. Any aspiration for inclusive bike-sharing and shared micro-mobilities is fundamentally related to the use of space and, this being the case, these shared mobility services need to be considered in terms of how they manifest or undermine established power relations. Particularly in the United States, newly implemented bicycle paths and bike-share schemes have been critiqued on the grounds of equity and contributing to gentrification processes, where only an advantaged part of society receives the benefits of transport policy and investment. Similarly, shared mobility schemes have generated a “bikelash”, resistance and hostility towards the presence of cyclists or cycling facilities in the streets. Nevertheless, there is still relatively little research into how bike-share and other emerging forms of shared micro-mobility are impacting upon spatial justice in different contexts. In this special issue we aim at introducing critical approaches to these mobility schemes, namely bike-sharing and shared micro-mobility. We would like to encourage a geographical view in which the use and abuse of space is the key to understand and unveil the existing power relations, impacts and conflicts amongst all kinds of actors involved.
Project
Not funded yet but very exciting! With fantastic colleagues on board.
Project
With video recordings as data, we investigate how people use online video tutorials in the perspective of ethnomethodology and conversation analysis.